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  • 101.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    Pilot plans2001Report (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    Road vehicle transportation of children with disabilites2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    Road vehicle transportation of children with disabilities.2000In: Journal of traffic medicine, ISSN 0345-5564, Vol. 28, no 2 supplArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, NP
    The Prevalence of Learner Drivers with Cerebral Palsy who Are in Need of Highly Specialized Driver Education2000In: Journal of Traffic Medicine, ISSN 0345-5564, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    The TRAINER Project: Development of a New Cost-Effective Pan-European Driver Training Methodology and How to Evaluate It.2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    The TRAINER project: the evaluation of a new simulator-based driver training methodology.2003In: Driver Behaviour and Training, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing LTD , 2003, p. 317-330Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    The TRAINER project: the evaluation of a new simulator-based driver training methodology.2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    TRAINER - results from a pan-European driver training project with focus on hazardous situations and risk awareness2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Henriksson, P.
    Gregersen, N.P.
    Bjurulf, P.
    Driver education for persons with cerebral palsy: a retrospective study of educational problems2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Henriksson, P
    Gregersen, NP
    Bjurulf, P
    Driver education for persons with cerebral palsy: a retrospective study of educational problems.2000In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin Univerisity, Perth, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Shipping and Marine Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dukic, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barnett, Tania
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Usability of the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system in children with cognitive disabilities2014In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    SAFEWAY2SCHOOL is a programme based on several systems for the enhancement of school transportation safety for children. The aim of the study was to explore whether children with cognitive disabilities will notice, realise, understand, trust and accept the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system and act in accordance with its instructions.

    Methods

    Fourteen children with cognitive disabilities and a control group of 23 children were shown five videos of scenarios involving journeys to and from school. During the first viewing visual scanning patterns were recorded with an eye tracking device. After a second viewing the participant was asked ten questions per scenario. Five questions addressed what the children saw on the video, and the remaining five what they would need to know and/or do within the scenario. Additional ratings of trust, likability, acceptability and usability were also collected.

    Results

    Very few differences were found in the visual scanning patterns of children with disabilities compared to children who participated in the control group. Of the 50 questions regarding what children saw or needed to know and/or do, only one significant difference between groups was found. No significant differences were found regarding self-reported ratings of trust, acceptability or usability of the system. Despite some significant differences across five of the 11 likability aspects, ratings were consistently high for both groups.

    Conclusions

    Children with cognitive disabilities proved that the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system is as useful for them as it was for children in the control group. However, a valid estimation of the full utility of SAFEWAY2SCHOOL requires in situ testing of the system with these children.

  • 112.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Khalid, J
    Rayees Afroza, M
    Hasewinkel, H
    Sjörs, A
    Dahlman, J
    In PC and XBOX war games, are military personnel's fixations patterns different compared to civilians'?2008In: Proceedings of Measuring Behavior 2008, Maastricht, The Netherlands, August 26-29, 2008, p. 204-205Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lövgren, A.
    Anund, A.
    Nyberg, J.
    Elkehag, K.
    Elm, C.
    Gustafson, P.
    Åkerberg, P.
    Säkerhet och trygghet i samband med skolskjuts: ur barnens perspektiv.2006Report (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Lövgren, A
    Rydh, C
    Nielsen, B
    Peters, B
    Driver Assessment and VTI Evaluation Method2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Nielsen, B
    Driving Assessment from an OT point of view: what sholud we assess and from which perspective2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 116.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nordmark, S.
    Truck simulator feasibility study.2002Report (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Renner, Linda
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, VTI.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, VTI.
    Estimated societal costs of a hierarchical measures approach to enhanced school transportation safety at bus stops on roads with high speed limits2010In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Most school bus related injury events in Sweden take place when the child is outside the bus. In order to enhance their safety, the societal costs of four different measures applied on “bus stops” on high speed roads were investigated.

    Methods

    From a door-to-door perspective, a measure hierarchy, comprising the four existing measures, viz.: Rerouting using the current operating vehicle, New construction, Rerouting using a different operating vehicle, Speed reduction in the vicinity of the “bus stop” was applied.

    Results

    By allocating 7.7 € per child per school day, almost nine out of ten children’s transportation safety may substantially be enhanced, simply by rerouting the current operating vehicle or using alternative operating vehicles.

    Conclusions

    In the investigated municipality it was feasible to enhance school transportation safety for children by implementing cheap and alternative measures.

  • 118.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Vogel, K
    Gregersen, NP
    The Test of Visual Perceptual Skills (non-motor) Upper Level is not a valid predictor for the outcome of driver education.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119. Forsman, Å
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Handbook guidance promoting a safe journey for children with disabilities: an evaluation.2006In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 712-724Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120. Forsman, Å.
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Paulsson, K.
    The Safe Ride for Children with Disabilities: Parental Guidance through a Handbook2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Continuing Mobility and Occupational Participation Outside the Home in Old Age is an Act of Negotiation2011In: Activities, Adaptation & Aging, ISSN 0192-4788, E-ISSN 1544-4368, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 275-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facilitated by mobility, occupational participaton is vital in old age. However, the relative importance of other influencing factors remains unclear. The present study describes older people's motives for, and experiences of, mobility and occuoational participation outside the home. Nine focus group interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Occupational participation and mobility was individually experienced even if some subjective perspectives were common. Continuing mobility and occupational participation outside the home in old age is an act of negotiation, encompassing occupational means and goals, occupational and mobility adaptation, and occupational barrieres and facilitators.

  • 122.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Dahl, Anna K.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Changes in community mobility in older men and women. A 13-year prospective study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e87827-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. The present study describes factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47% of men and 45% of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  • 123.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Corr, Susan
    School of Health, the University of Northampton.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Viewpoints on community mobility and participation in older age2012In: Journal of Human Subjectivity, ISSN 1598-8643, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 103-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Community mobility supports participation in activities. However, knowledge about issues that influence community mobility and, hence, participation in activities outside the home is limited. Since participation and community mobility are subjectively defined phenomena, further knowledge from an insider’s perspective is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and describe viewpoints on community mobility and participation in older age. Methods: A Q-methodology study was conducted with 36 male and female participants, including drivers and non-drivers. Participants sorted 45 Q-statements along a most to least continuum, indicating their current habitual situation of mobility and participation in activities outside their homes. Results: Three viewpoints were found and assigned content-describing denominations; “Prefer being mobile by car, “Prefer being mobile by public transport” and “Prefer flexible mobility”. Conclusions: All participants were satisfied with their actual participation in activities outside their homes. However, those who preferred to use public transport were less satisfied with their opportunities and possibilities to participate in activities outside their homes. The existing demand-responsive Special Transportation System was not considered to be an attractive enough alternative by any of the participants. Intermediate community mobility options are thus needed for those who can no longer drive or use public transport.

  • 124.
    Goh, Kwang Leng
    et al.
    School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Australia.
    Morris, Susan
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Australia.
    Rosalie, Simon
    School of Physiotherapy andPhysiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Australia.
    Foster, Chris
    Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Australia.
    Typically developed adults and adults with autism spectrum disorder classification using centre of pressure measurements2016In: 2016 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing: proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, Vol. 41, p. 844-848Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders which affect a persons ability to interact with the world around him/her. Emerging studies have shown abnormal postural control in people with ASD. The aim of this study was to enable the classification of adults with ASD and typically developed (TD) adults based on force plate measurements of centre of pressure. Nineteen typical adults and eleven adults diagnosed with ASD primarily high functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome participated in this study. A correlation-based feature selection algorithm was used to evaluate the quality of the attributes and the results have achieved up to 0.976 classification accuracy. 

  • 125. Gregersen, N.P.
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    In-vehicle support systems and young, novice drivers.2003In: Driver Behaviour and Training, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Ltd , 2003, p. 277-291Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 126. Gregersen, N.P.
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dols, J.
    Pardo, J.
    Driving simulator scenarios and requirements2001Report (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Gregersen, N.P
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sommer, S.
    Goals for driver education: Applications of the GDE theoretical framework on elderly drivers.2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Gribble, Nigel
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Donlau, Marie
    Linköping, Landstinget i Östergötland, Vuxenhabiliteringen, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Predictors of time to complete toileting for children with spina bifida2013In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Previous research has shown that children with spina bifida use clean intermittent catheterisation for urination, a rather complex procedure that increases the time taken to completion. However, no studies have analysed the factors impacting on the time taken to complete the urination that could inform occupational therapy practice. Therefore, the aim was to identify the variables that predict extended time children with spina bifida take to complete urination.

    Methods: Fifty children, aged 5–18 years old with spina bifida using clean intermittent catheterisation, were observed while toileting and responding to a set of assessments tools, among them the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A logistic regression was used to identify which variables were independently associated with an extended toileting time.

    Results: Children with spina bifida do take long time to urinate. More than half of this study's participants required more than five minutes completing urination, but not all required extended times. Ambulant, independent girls were more likely to perform toileting in less than six minutes compared with other children with spina bifida. However, age, IQ, maintained focus on the task, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, time processing abilities and self-reported ratings of independence appeared to be of no relevance, to predict extended toileting times.

    Conclusion: To minimise occupational disruption caused by extended toileting times, occupational therapists should utilise the relevant predictors: gender, independence and ambulation when they prioritise children for relevant interventions.

  • 129.
    Haas, Kaaren
    et al.
    Autism Spectrum Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia.
    Costley, Debra
    Autism Spectrum Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia.
    Richdale, Amanda
    Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.
    Sofronoff, Kate
    School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia.
    Factors Influencing the Research Participation of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders2016In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1793-1805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recruiting adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into research poses particular difficulties; longitudinal studies face additional challenges. This paper reports on a mixed methods study to identify factors influencing the participation in longitudinal autism research of adults with ASD, including those with an intellectual disability, and their carers. Common and differentiating factors influencing the research participation of participants are identified and discussed. Factors influencing participation were found to differ both between and within participant categories. We propose a dichotomy whereby factors influencing research participation can be classified as those arising from a participant’s values, which act as either a motivator or a deterrent; and those based on convenience, which act as either an enabler or inhibitor. These findings are applicable to research studies that seek to recruit adults with ASD as participants. 

  • 130. Hakamies-Blomqvist, L
    et al.
    Henriksson, P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Role of the medical profession in Finland and Sweden regarding ageing and driving1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131. Hakamies-Blomqvist, L
    et al.
    Henriksson, P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Lundberg, C
    Braekhus, A
    Attitudes of Primary Care Physicians toward Older Drivers: A Finnish-Swedish comparison2002In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 58-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132. Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa
    et al.
    Henriksson, Per
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Role of the medical profession in Finland and Sweden regarding ageing and driving1998In: 8th international conference on mobility and transport for elderly and disabled people, 1998, p. 717-722Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 133. Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa
    et al.
    Henriksson, Per
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Lundberg, C
    Körkortsdiagnostik i allmänläkarens dagliga patientarbete med äldre: en jämförelse av svenska och finska allmänläkares aktiviteter, kunskaper och attityder1998Report (Other academic)
  • 134. Hansson, L
    et al.
    Jeppsson, M
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Rafstedt, P
    Yong, L
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Effects of stature, age and vehicle motion on ingress movement2009In: International Journal of Vehicle Design, ISSN 0143-3369, E-ISSN 1741-5314, Vol. 51, no 3/4, p. 292-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicle ingress is an important automotive industry issue. End-users and production line assemblers perform similar ingress tasks. In this study, comparisons were made of the car ingress motion in 40 subjects of different statures, acting both as assemblers and end-users. Half of the subjects were under 28 years of age and the remaining were over 60. Results show no significant differences in motion patterns between assemblers and end-users, i.e., slow forward motion of the car on the assembly line had no effect on ingress patterns. This suggests that ergonomic departments working either with end-users or assemblers may instead cooperate or even be fully integrated. Stature significantly affected joint angle distribution and joint angle velocity distribution. No stature effect was found on time to perform ingress movements or on ingress technique. Age significantly affected all test parameters and is thus an issue for developers to consider along with anthropometric variables like stature. To facilitate age analysis, manikins in digital human modelling tools should be able to replicate the physical characteristics of different age groups and the movement behaviour of older people.

  • 135.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Occupational Therapy Program, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Factors related to successful transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum2018In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents on the autism spectrum often have difficulties with the transition from high school to post-school activities. Despite this, little is known about the transition planning processes for this group. This study explored predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors related to the transition planning processes for adolescents on the autism spectrum in Australia. The PRECEDE model guided a needs assessment, in which descriptive data about transition planning processes were collected via an online questionnaire from adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents and professionals (N = 162). Predisposing factors included: an individualised and strengths-focused approach, and adolescent motivation, anxiety and insight. Reinforcing factors included: support and guidance, skill development and real-life experiences. Enabling factors were: having a clear plan with a coordinated approach, scheduled meetings and clear formal documentation. Whilst some factors aligned with recommendations for transition planning for adolescents with disabilities in general, there were some autism-specific factors. For example: anxiety, motivation and insight were important predisposing factors, and providing choice and flexibility was an enabling factor.

  • 136.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Effectiveness of the BOOST-A online transition planning program for adolescents on the autism spectrum: A quasi-randomized controlled trial2017In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The majority of existing transition planning programs are focused on people with a disability in general and may not meet the specific need of adolescents on the autism spectrum. In addition, these interventions focus on specific skills (e.g. job readiness or self-determination) rather than the overall transition planning process and there are methodological limitations to many of the studies determining their effectiveness. The Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A (TM)) is an online program that supports adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the BOOST-A T in enhancing self-determination. 

    Methods: A quasi-randomized controlled trial was conducted with adolescents on the autism spectrum enrolled in years 8 to 11 in Australian schools (N = 94). Participants had to have basic computer skills and the ability to write at a year 5 reading level. Participants were allocated to a control (n = 45) or intervention (n = 49) group and participants were blinded to the trial hypothesis. The intervention group used the BOOST-A T for 12 months, while the control group participated in regular practice. Outcomes included self-determination, career planning and exploration, quality of life, environmental support and domain specific self-determination. Data were collected from parents and adolescents. 

    Results: There were no significant differences in overall self-determination between groups. Results indicated significant differences in favor of the intervention group in three areas: opportunity for self-determination at home as reported by parents; career exploration as reported by parents and adolescents; and transition-specific self-determination as reported by parents. 

    Conclusions: Results provide preliminary evidence that the BOOST-A T can enhance some career-readiness outcomes. Lack of significant outcomes related to self-determination at school and career planning may be due to the lack of face-to-face training and parents being the primary contacts in the study. Further research is needed to determine effectiveness of the BOOST-A T related to post-secondary education and employment.

  • 137.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Occupational Therapy Program, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Evaluation of the effectiveness of an online transition planning program for adolescents on the autism spectrum: Trial protocol2016In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 10, no 48, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The transition from high school to post-secondary education and work is difficult for adolescents on the autism spectrum. Transition planning can be an effective way of supporting adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school and to succeed in obtaining employment; however, there is a need for an autism-specific transition planning program with proven effectiveness. This paper describes a trial protocol for evaluating the Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A™); an online interactive program that empowers adolescents on the autism spectrum to plan their transition from school to further study, training, or employment.

    METHODS: The trial will involve adolescents on the autism spectrum in high school and their parents, who will be alternately assigned to a control group (regular practice) or an intervention group (using the BOOST-A™). The BOOST-A™ was developed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, and is based on the self-determination model, and the strengths- and technology-based approaches. It involves participants completing a series of online modules. The primary outcome will be self-determination, because high self-determination has been linked to successful transition to employment among adolescents on the autism spectrum. Secondary outcomes will include domain-specific self-determination, career planning and exploration, quality of life, and environmental support. Data will be obtained from questionnaires completed by the adolescent on the autism spectrum and their parent/s. Data collection will take place at baseline (Time point 1) and 12 months later (Time point 2).

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: This trial will provide evidence of the effectiveness of the BOOST-A™ to assist adolescents on the autism spectrum to successfully transition from school. 

  • 138.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Australia.
    "Leaps of faith": Parents' and professionals' viewpoints on preparing adolescents on the autism spectrum for leaving school2017In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 187-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents on the autism spectrum experience difficulty transitioning from secondary school to post-school activities, often due to transition planning processes that do not meet their unique needs. This study identified parents' and professionals' viewpoints on transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum. Interviews were completed with nine parents of adolescents on the autism spectrum and four professionals who worked with adolescents on the autism spectrum. A constant comparison approach was used to analyse the transcripts. Four themes were identified, reflecting parents' and professionals' viewpoints on how to meet the transition planning needs of adolescents on the autism spectrum. Supporting adolescents to grasp the big picture can enhance motivation to participate in transition planning. Autism can be an ‘invisible disability’; therefore, encouraging adolescents to be active participants and to be seen in transition planning ensures their individual needs are met. Encouraging adolescents to have high aspirationsin transition planning develops their self-determination. Finally, to be prepared for the transition from school may reduce the adolescent's' anxiety. Adolescents on the autism spectrum face unique challenges in transition planning. The themes identified in this study provide insight into how parents and professionals might support adolescents with these challenges.

  • 139.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Process evaluation of the BOOST-A™ Transition Planning Program for Adolescents on the autism spectrum: A strengths-based approach2018In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A process evaluation was conducted to determine the effectiveness, usability, and barriers and facilitators related to the Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A (TM)), an online transition planning program. Adolescents on the autism spectrum (n = 33) and their parents (n = 39) provided feedback via an online questionnaire. Of these, 13 participants were interviewed to gain in-depth information about their experiences. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (i) taking action to overcome inertia, (ii) new insights that led to clear plans for the future, (iii) adolescent empowerment through strengths focus, and (iv) having a champion to guide the way. The process evaluation revealed why BOOST-A (TM) was beneficial to some participants more than others. 

  • 140.
    Henning, Belindi
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia .
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia .
    Wilkes-Gillan, Sarah
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Bentley, Australia.
    A pilot play-based intervention to improve the social play interactions of children with autism spectrum disorder and their typically developing playmates2016In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 223-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim: Occupational therapists play a key role in addressing the social difficulties of children with ASD. However, interventions are often time intensive, without outcomes generalising beyond the clinic setting. To examine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an intervention to address the social play skills of children with ASD.

    Methods: Participants in this multiple case study design were five children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), five typically developing playmates and five parents of children with ASD. Two therapists and parents delivered the intervention involving clinic play sessions and home modules. Parents' treatment adherence was recorded. The Test of Playfulness was scored by a blinded rater to examine child outcomes following the intervention. Line graphs were used to examine case data. Percentage of non-overlapping data (PND) was used to calculate the single-case effect size for each child.

    Results: Parents completed 92.2% of the intervention. Children's case data showed an upwards trend from pre- to post-intervention in four of the five pairs (child with ASD and playmate). However, there was a decrease in scores from post-intervention to the two-month home follow-up for all but one pair. PND indicated the intervention was effective for two children with ASD and three of their playmates, had a questionable effect on three children with ASD and no observable effect on two playmates.

    Conclusion: The intervention demonstrated preliminary feasibility and effectiveness for improving the social play skills of some children with ASD. Careful consideration is needed to identify which children with ASD and which playmates would be best suited for this intervention approach. 

  • 141. Henriksson, P
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Bekiaris, E
    Sommer, S
    The AGILE project: problems of older drivers in relation to the driving task2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 142. Hoeschen, A.
    et al.
    Vervey, W.
    Bekiaris, E.
    Knoll, C.
    Widlroiter, H.
    Ward, D.d
    Uneken, E.
    Gregersen, N.P
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Schelin, H.
    Inventory of drivers training needs and major gaps in the relevant training procedures2001Report (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Horlin, Chiara
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    School of Psychology & Speech Pathology, CHIRI, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Leung, Denise
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Tan, Tele
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Lee, Wee Lih
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Visual search strategies of children with and without autism spectrum disorders during an embedded figures task2014In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 463-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals with ASD often demonstrate superior performance on embedded figures tasks (EFTs). We investigated visual scanning behaviour in children with ASD during an EFT in an attempt replicating a previous study examining differences in visual search behaviour. Twenty-three children with, and 31 children without an ASD were shown 16 items from the Figure-Ground subtest of the TVPS-3 while wearing an eye tracker. Children with ASD exhibited fewer fixations, and less time per fixation, on the target figure. Accuracy was similar between the two groups. There were no other noteworthy differences between children with and without ASD. Differences in visual scanning patterns in the presence of typical behavioural performance suggest that any purported differences in processing style may not be detrimental to cognitive performance and further refinement of the current methodology may lead to support for a purported advantageous cognitive style.

  • 144.
    Horlin, Chiara
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Black, Melissa
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Proficiency of individuals with autism spectrum disorder at disembedding figures: A systematic review2016In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 54-63Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This systematic review examines the proficiency and visual search strategies of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) while disembedding figures and whether they differ from typical controls and other comparative samples.

    Methods: Five databases, including Proquest, Psychinfo, Medline, CINAHL and Science Direct were used to identify published studies meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria.

    Results: Twenty articles were included in the review, the majority of which matched participants by mental age. Outcomes discussed were time taken to identify targets, the number correctly identified, and fixation frequency and duration.

    Conclusions: Individuals with ASD perform at the same speed or faster than controls and other clinical samples. However, there appear to be no differences between individuals with ASD and controls for number of correctly identified targets. Only one study examined visual search strategies and suggests that individuals with ASD exhibit shorter first and final fixations to targets compared with controls.

  • 145.
    Horlin, Chiara
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Fitzgerald, Patrick
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The influence of static versus naturalistic stimuli on face processing in children with and without Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism2013In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 1617-1624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions regarding the use of static or dynamic facial stimuli in experimental studies investigating facial processing of individuals with AS/HFA raises issues of both ecological validity and the applicability of experimental findings to clinical or everyday practice. Children with and without AS/HFA (n = 38) were fitted with a head-mounted eye-tracker and exposed to either static or interactive dynamic facial stimuli. Average fixation duration, the proportion of fixations in areas of interest and a comparative index that was independent of differences in presentation length between stimuli types were calculated. Visual scanning patterns of individuals with AS/HFA were not affected by stimuli type. However, control participants exhibited different scanning patterns between dynamic and static stimuli for certain regions of the face. Visual scanning patterns in children with AS/HFA are consistent regardless of the stimuli being a static photo or dynamic in the form of a real face. Hence, information from experimental studies with static photos of faces provide information that is valid and can be generalised to “real world” interactions.

  • 146.
    Horlin, Chiara
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    School of Psychology, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The cost of autism spectrum disorders2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e106552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    A diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorders is usually associated with substantial lifetime costs to an individual, their family and the community. However, there remains an elusive factor in any cost-benefit analysis of ASD diagnosis, namely the cost of not obtaining a diagnosis. Given the infeasibility of estimating the costs of a population that, by its nature, is inaccessible, the current study compares expenses between families whose children received a formal ASD diagnosis immediately upon suspecting developmental atypicality and seeking advice, with families that experienced a delay between first suspicion and formal diagnosis.

    Design

    A register based questionnaire study covering all families with a child with ASD in Western Australia.

    Participants

    Families with one or more children diagnosed with an ASD, totalling 521 children diagnosed with an ASD; 317 records were able to be included in the final analysis.

    Results

    The median family cost of ASD was estimated to be AUD $34,900 per annum with almost 90% of the sum ($29,200) due to loss of income from employment. For each additional symptom reported, approximately $1,400 cost for the family per annum was added. While there was little direct influence on costs associated with a delay in the diagnosis, the delay was associated with a modest increase in the number of ASD symptoms, indirectly impacting the cost of ASD.

    Conclusions

    A delay in diagnosis was associated with an indirect increased financial burden to families. Early and appropriate access to early intervention is known to improve a child's long-term outcomes and reduce lifetime costs to the individual, family and society. Consequently, a per symptom dollar value may assist in allocation of individualised funding amounts for interventions rather than a nominal amount allocated to all children below a certain age, regardless of symptom presentation, as is the case in Western Australia.

  • 147.
    Hughes, B. P.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Anund, A.
    Swedish Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    A comprehensive conceptual framework for road safety strategies2016In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 90, p. 13-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Road safety strategies (generally called Strategic Highway Safety Plans in the USA) provide essential guidance for actions to improve road safety, but often lack a conceptual framework that is comprehensive, systems theory based, and underpinned by evidence from research and practice. This paper aims to incorporate all components, policy tools by which they are changed, and the general interactions between them. A framework of nine mutually interacting components that contribute to crashes and ten generic policy tools which can be applied to reduce the outcomes of these crashes was developed and used to assess 58 road safety strategies from 22 countries across 15 years. The work identifies the policy tools that are most and least widely applied to components, highlighting the potential for improvements to any individual road safety strategy, and the potential strengths and weaknesses of road safety strategies in general. The framework also provides guidance for the development of new road safety strategies, identifying potential consequences of policy tool based measures with regard to exposure and risk, useful for both mobility and safety objectives.

  • 148.
    Jacob, Andrew
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Scott, Melissa
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The costs and benefits of employing an adult with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 1-15, article id e0139896Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Despite an ambition from adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to be employed, there are limited opportunities for competitive employment for this group. Employment is not only an entitlement enjoyed by others in society, but employing adults with ASD also has economic benefits by decreasing lost productivity and resource costs for this group. Few studies have explored the cost-benefit ratio for employing adults with ASD and even fewer have taken the viewpoint of the employer, particularly applying this situation to ASD. Until such study occurs, employers may continue to be reluctant to employ adults from this group.

    Objective

    This review aimed to examine the costs, benefits and the cost-benefit ratio of employing adults with ASD, from a societal perspective and from the perspective of employers.

    Methods

    Eight databases were searched for scientific studies within defined inclusion criteria. These databases included CINAHL Plus, Cochrane Library, Emerald, Ovid Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science.

    Results and Conclusion

    Enhancing the opportunities for adults with ASD to join the workforce is beneficial from a societal perspective, not only from an inclusiveness viewpoint, but also from a strict economic standpoint. Providing supported employment services for adults with ASD does not only cut the cost compared with providing standard care, it also results in better outcomes for adults with ASD. Despite the fact that ASD was the most expensive group to provide vocational rehabilitation services for, adults with ASD have a strong chance of becoming employed once appropriate measures are in place. Hence, rehabilitation services could be considered as a worthwhile investment. The current systematic review uncovered the fact that very few studies have examined the benefits, the costs and the cost-benefit ratio of employing an adult with ASD from the perspective of employers indicating a need for this topic to be further explored.

  • 149.
    Joosten, Annette
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Leung, Denise
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fleischer, Håkan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gaze and visual search strategies of children with Asperger syndrome/high functioning autism viewing a magic trick2016In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine visual search patterns and strategies used by children with and without Asperger syndrome/high functioning autism (AS/HFA) while watching a magic trick. Limited responsivity to gaze cues is hypothesised to contribute to social deficits in children with AS/HFA.

    Methods: Twenty-one children with AS/HFA and 31 matched peers viewed a video of a gaze-cued magic trick twice. Between the viewings, they were informed about how the trick was performed. Participants’ eye movements were recorded using a head-mounted eye-tracker.

    Results: Children with AS/HFA looked less frequently and had shorter fixation on the magician’s direct and averted gazes during both viewings and more frequently at not gaze-cued objects and on areas outside the magician’s face. After being informed of how the trick was conducted, both groups made fewer fixations on gaze-cued objects and direct gaze.

    Conclusions: Information may enhance effective visual strategies in children with and without AS/HFA.

  • 150. Kircher, K.
    et al.
    Thorslund, B.
    Kircher, A.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Anund, A.
    Passering av buss i 30 km/h: Utvärdering av säkerhetseffekter i samband med hastighetsgräns 30 km/h vid passering av buss - en simulatorstudie.2007Report (Other academic)
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