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  • 101.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Information fusion in maintenance planning2007In: Proceedings of Swedish Production Symposium, Göteborg, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial production service organisations, companies maintainingproduction machines and whole processes as well as factories, are in great demand ofproductivity and profitavility improvement. Usually performance in theseorganisations arises from high utilization of personnel, superior engineeringknowledge and purchasing expertise/power. However, small and medium sizedmaintenance service providers mostly differate themselves with two first mentioneditems. In this paper we will propose information fusion cockpit to be used in theSME maintenance organisation to enhance problem solving, demand visibility andresource need estimates – hopefully this will enhance the performance of a caseorganisation. As a key input variable to manage large amount of different customerswe identify incoming calls to trigger information collection from vast number ofdifferent databases – the integration of this incoming “demand” is the first step to betaken in the use of more advanced systems. We also speculate in this paper, howagent based artificial intelligence could be used in order to take full benefit frommore advanced system.

  • 102.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ronnie
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Agent-based simulation fusion for improved decision making for service operations2009In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Information Fusion, Seattle, US, 2009, p. 998-1005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use agent-based modeling and simulation to fuse data from multiple sources to estimate the state of some system properties. This implies that the real system of interest is modeled and simulated using agent principles. Using Monte-Carlo simulation, we estimate the values of some decision-relevant numerical properties. We use the estimated properties, such as utilization of resources and service levels, as a decision support for a Maintenance Service Provider. Our initial results indicate that this kind of fusion of information sources can improve the understanding of the problem domain (e.g. to what degree some critical properties influence service operations) and also generate a basis for decision-making.

  • 103.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Challenges with industralization in a supply chain network: A supplier perspective2015In: Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference, Bari, Italy, 27–29 May 2015., 2015, p. 309-318Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the challenges with industrialization across a supply chain network, from a supplier perspective. The study focuses on identifying the challenges encountered by the supplier, when working with industrialization alongside the customer’s industrialization process, the reasons for and the effects of these challenges, as well as how these challenges can be managed. These issues have been examined through a single case study including a Swedish company from the polymer systems and components industry. Empirical data has been collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews. This study has identified fourteen challenges as well as their main reasons and effects. In addition, solutions to the challenges have been identified. The challenges can be classified as internal or external. An internal challenge originates from inside the supplier’s own organization, while an external challenge originates from the customer’s organization or from the collaboration between the two organizations. This study is explorative in nature and is limited to one supplier located in Sweden. Thus, empirical data from similar and other research settings should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.  

     Keywords: Industrialization; Production ramp-up; Supply chain; Supplier

  • 104.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    et al.
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Kiisler, Ain
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Cabotage and Sulphur Regulation Change: Cost Effects to Northern Europe2017In: International Journal of Business and Systems Research, ISSN 1751-200X, E-ISSN 1751-2018, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 417-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Change has been persistent in European Union regarding new directive and international agreements concerning logistics sector. Recently cabotage rules were implemented for road transports, and new demanding low sulphur levels applied at English Channel, North Sea and Baltic Sea for sea vessels. Our research concerns the implications to transportation costs of these changes in largest Estonian, Finnish and Swedish companies. Survey shows that cabotage regulation change has resulted in no change within road freight prices (some possibility for decline). In contrary, sulphur regulation has resulted in freight cost increases (up to 6 % higher than before). Interestingly respondents show some movement in the use of different routes to or from Central Europe.Using a longer hinterland transportation route through Baltics has some momentum to grow, while others are under of somewhat pressure. However, this noted change is not significant, and does not concern most the companies.

  • 105.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    et al.
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lorentz, Harri
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Malmsten, Jarmo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Manufacturing strategy in SMEs and its performance implications2015In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1004-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– West European manufacturing has been going through challenging times after the global financial crisis of 2008-2009. Some countries (e.g. Sweden and Germany) have recovered from the crisis, while in others problems and job loss still persist. One of these problem countries is Finland. The purpose of this paper is to examine manufacturing strategy priorities and their performance implications in this country.

    Design/methodology/approach– During the spring of 2014, a web-based survey was conducted, targeting Finnish manufacturing companies. In this study we focus on small- and medium-sized (SMEs) companies and link survey responses to financial performance data, which is available in audited annual reports.

    Findings– Research results indicate that SME manufacturers in Finland put less emphasis in new product development, broadness of product line and after sales service, while showing high priority in delivery speed and punctuality. As the manufacturing strategy dimensions are connected to audited financial data, regression analyses reveal that superior quality is at central place for achieving higher revenues and profits. After sales service has a positive impact on revenues and new product development ability is connected to higher profits. Managing quality to meet specifications (minimum quality level), leads only into higher employment. Some evidence is shown in support of flexibility in terms of product changes having negative impact on revenue, while volume flexibility is connected to lower profits.

    Research limitations/implications– This research is limited to a single country, and is cross-sectional in nature. The primary data were combined with profit and loss statements in order to reduce common method bias.

    Practical implications– It is evident that SMEs may adapt their manufacturing strategy, with emphasis on superior quality together with properly managed after sales service and new product development activity. However, it is worrying that head count in manufacturing SMEs is not connected to same factors, as are revenue and profit. It is suggested that flexibility in labour contracts and other regulatory support measures are needed to support flexible manufacturing.

    Originality/value– Advanced economies and their remaining manufacturing companies have been receiving minor levels of interest in research. This is especially the case with SMEs, where this research tries to fill important research gap.

  • 106.
    Hong, Mei-Hsiu
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru (Jiun-Shen)
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Kao, Ching-Kuei
    Hsing-Kuo University of Management, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Setting organizational key performance indicators in the precision machine industry2015In: International Journal of Management, Knowledge, and Learning, ISSN 2232-5107, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 135-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to define (or set) organizational key performance indicators (KPIs) in the precision machine industry using the concept of core competence and the supply chain operations reference (SCOR) model. The research is conducted in three steps. In the first step, a benchmarking study is conducted to collect major items of core competence and to group them into main categories in order to form a foundation for the research. In the second step, a case company questionnaire and interviews are conducted to identify the key factors of core competence in the precision machine industry. The analysis is conducted based on four dimensions and hence several analysis rounds are completed. Questionnaire data is analyzed with grey relational analysis (GRA) and resulted in 5–6 key factors in each dimension or sub-dimension. Based on the conducted interviews, 13 of these identified key factors are separated into one organization objective, five key factors of core competence and seven key factors of core ability. In the final step, organizational KPIs are defined (or set) for the five identified key factors of core competence. The most competitive core abilities for each of the five key factors are established. After that, organizational KPIs are set based on the core abilities within 3 main categories of KPIs (departmental, office grade and hierarchal) for each key factor. The developed KPI system based on organizational objectives, core competences, and core abilities allow enterprises to handle dynamic market demand and business environments, as well as changes in overall corporate objectives.

  • 107.
    Huang, Dan-Ching
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    Department of Marketing, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Kao, Ching-Kuei
    Department of Business Administration, Hsing-Kuo University of Management, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Creation of a step-by-step process in the pre-startup of a micro business2016In: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a systematic process in the pre-startup stage of establishing independent and franchised catering micro businesses. A questionnaire based on the key success factors (KSFs) affecting the establishment of a micro business was developed. Grey relational analysis (GRA) was performed to determine KSFs that can affect the start of a catering micro business, while interpretive structure modelling (ISM) was used to establish the pre-startup process. Studies show that GRA and ISM results were different in the two types of catering businesses. Therefore, business starters ought to investigate their industry of interest and determine the startup process prior to establishing their respective businesses.

  • 108. Into, C
    et al.
    Zetterberg, S
    Hilletofth, P
    Transit-inventory as a strategy in a global distribution system2009In: PLANs forsknings- och tillämpningskonferens 2009 : effektiva och lönsamma försörjningskedjor: artiklar från konferensen på Växjö universitet 19-20 augusti 2009, Växjö, Sweden, 2009, p. 93-103Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Into, Camilla
    et al.
    Akzo Nobel.
    Zetterberg, Stefan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Sverige.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde, Sverige.
    Transitlager som en strategi i ett globalt distributionssystem2010In: Bättre produktivitet, ISSN 1402-1145, Vol. 5, p. 12-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Distributionen har kommit att bli en nyckelfaktor i dagens logistiksystem i ochmed att företag önskar uppnå skalfördelar i sin produktion genom fokuseradefabriker samtidigt som dagens kunder kräver alltmer kundanpassade produkteroch leveranser till kortare ledtider. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka omtransitlagerstrategin, som ett komplement till den centraliserade och dendecentraliserade distributionsstrategin, kan erbjuda företag konkurrensfördelar.Studien visar att transitlagerstrategin kan ge stora konkurrensfördelar genomatt den erbjuder relativt korta leveranstider utan att produkterna behöverlagerhållas lokalt, vilket ger lägre lagerhållningskostnader och en lägrekapitalbindning. För att lyckas med strategin krävs en god planering,kundsamarbete, marknadskännedom och ett informationssystem som klarar avatt stödja strategin.

  • 110.
    Jafari, Hamid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Nyberg, Anna
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Postponement and logistics flexibility in retailing: A multiple case study from Sweden2016In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 445-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how postponement is applied in retailing and how such application is connected to logistics flexibility.

    Design/methodology/approach – An overview of the established typological classifications of postponement and logistics flexibility is presented followed by empirical results from three case studies of retailers of electronics, furniture, and grocery in Sweden. The study relies on primary qualitative data gathered on the retailers as well as secondary material on some suppliers including logistics providers for further insight.

    Findings – The results of the study show that retailers have different practices when it comes to postponement and speculation; however, there is a growing tendency toward postponement among retailers by exploring new means of applying postponement. The results reveal that retailers that have higher application of postponement seem to be more flexible in their logistics operations.

    Research limitations/implications – The paper provides direction for further empirical research of the topic, by indicating the application of postponement is not constrained to the point of purchase and could be extended by involving consumers as well as capitalizing on suppliers’ competences and capabilities. Especially, sales services, software, and upgrades could provide opportunity for further expanding the concept.

    Originality/value – The paper contributes to the existing literature on logistics practices of postponement and speculation, as well as logistics flexibility by focussing on retail firms in Sweden. Most of the prior scholarly work on postponement and flexibility is on the manufacturing context.

  • 111.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Outcomes of reshoring for Swedish firms: The influence of industrial networks2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sourcing from China: Approaches and outcomes for Swedish firms2017In: The 29th NOFOMA Conference ”Taking On Grand Challenges” / [ed] Daniel Hellström, Joakim Kembro and Hajnalka Bodnar, Nordic Logistics Research Network, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The large and   persistent trend of firms sourcing from China is in itself well-established with many success stories. However, managing the sourcing is a complex issue confounded both by cultural differences and the length of the supply chain. Outcomes are often described primarily in terms of cost savings.

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse how Swedish firms manage their sourcing in China and connect this to the types of outcomes achieved.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study is based on a series of semi-structured interviews with Swedish production firms sourcing from China. These findings are then confronted with previous research on sourcing from China from other regions.

    Findings

    The paper finds that the firms have developed good monitoring systems for their sourcing work and are generally satisfied with the outcomes, but also have persistent communication issues. The ability to source effectively from China, based on many years of experience and having handled prior difficulties is seen as a competitive advantage.

    Research limitations/implications  

    One archetype of Swedish firms successfully sourcing from China emerges from the research. The research only deals with selected Swedish production firms however and may not show the general situation for Swedish firms sourcing from China.

    Practical implications

    The implications are that the development and use of monitoring systems seems to be a critical component of sourcing success.

    Original/value

    The research addresses a gap where the actual outcomes of sourcing beyond general   assessments of whether they are successful are little explored in the literature, in particular from the Swedish perspective.

  • 113.
    Jensen, Åsa
    et al.
    Volvo Powertrain.
    Palm, Lena
    Volvo Powertrain.
    Claesson, Frida
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Supply chain planning in automotive sector: Swedish Case Study2010In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Skövde, 2010, p. 53-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to enhance current knowledge of supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. The issues are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, Volvo Powertrain, which operates in automotive industry through its worldwide manufacturing network. This research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information and these together drives the performance of a supply chain. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in Volvo Powertrain quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains severalmanual phases. This study is explorative in nature and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, is needed to further validate the findings. However, its empirical findings strengthen research discipline knowhow of SCP in global manufacturing companies.This research provides insights to managers and practitioners on how to coordinate operations planning and control (OPC) across organizations within the supply chain to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. The SCP procedures described in this research work also are valuable for Volvo Powertrain and other industrial actors to further develop processes to respond on competitive pressure. This research work empirically demonstrates, as very few before have done so, how OPC can be coordinated across the supply chain. It is also based on the most recent observations from the automotive industry sector, where structural renewal has been ongoing in the recent decade due to global production overcapacity.

  • 114.
    Jugend, Daniel
    et al.
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    De Araujo, Tiago Ribeiro
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Gobbo Jr, José Alcides
    São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    The role of cross-functional integration in new product development: Differences between incremental and radical innovation projects2018In: Innovation: Organization & Management, ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 42-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on new product development (NPD) contains several studies of management practices involved in different types of innovation. However, few studies focus on how cross-functional integration affects incremental and radical innovation product projects. The purpose of this study is to explore this aspect, from a qualitative perspective, through case studies of four high-tech firms in Brazil. Eight NPD projects were studied. The findings suggest that radical and incremental innovation NPD projects require different management practices in the studied cases. In incremental NPD projects, greater integration efforts may not be necessary. However, the following practices should be adopted in projects involving radical innovation product projects: intense involvement of technical teams, flexibility in the early stages of NPD, and geographical separation between the development team and other departments of the firm. Moreover, the application of these same practices in projects of incremental innovation in NPD may not bring positive results.

  • 115. Jäger, K
    et al.
    Hilletofth, P
    Ujvari, S
    From standard 3PL provider to service developer: A case study from the Swedish furniture industry2009In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 376-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong competition between companies has resulted in an increased outsourcing of activities that are not considered core activities. This has created an emerging business opportunity in logistics, attracting several new actors and companies to enter the market and fill the demand for new services. These actors represent several types of providers who are often called Third-Party Logistics (3PL) providers. The purpose of this study is to investigate the environment of a 3PL provider that also develops services. The focus is particularly on how the provider has evolved and identifying the key issues on how to be successful in the 3PL industry. The primary research strategy is a descriptive embedded single case study. The findings reveal that the case company has evolved from being a standard 3PL provider to a service developer, since it, in addition to traditional services, nowadays also provides more value-added services. These services involve a set of more standardised activities that can be combined according to each customer's wishes and requirements. The findings also reveal that the main requirements to be a successful service developer are a clear customer understanding and focus, value-added and customised services and reliable deliveries (both in terms of time and a low percentage of damaged goods), as well as the utilisation of Information and Communications Technology (ICT).

  • 116.
    Jäger, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Anna
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Logistics actors: Key issues for a service developer2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, Skövde, Sweden, 2008, p. 1329-1336Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The very hard competition between companies have resulted in an increased outsourcing of many activities thatare not considered to be core activities, or main business processes. This has created an emerging businessopportunity attracting many new actors, companies, to enter the market and fill the demand for new services.Logistics is one example of activities not seen as core competence in many companies; in this paper we use adescriptive case study approach to illustrate the requirements to succeed as such a logistics service provider.Primarily this requires a close relationship between the actors and trust and openness are important factors tomaintain. The kind of relationship, the exchange of information, the nurturing of trust and the service ofinformation systems has to be solved. The case-study is based on a company, LBC, which acts as a logisticsservice developer, and the focus is on the services provided and the company’s view of the customer relationship.Findings reveal that logistics service developer to a large extent needs to focus on the customer and continuouslydevelop their service range to offer improved/new services. We have found that LBC has gone from a traditional3PL to become a service developer and provide customized services according to every single customers need.The most important is to have a starting point from the view of the customer. LBC solve this, among other things,with a personal contact to every customer. According to the literature one could segment different logisticsactors into four categories.

  • 117.
    Katana, Toni
    et al.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Andreas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Decision model for product rollover in manufacturing operations2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 15, p. 1264-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate critical decisions when planning for product rollover at a manufacturing company, and how to organise these decisions. A literature review and a case study are used to develop a decision model. The findings indicate that product rollover can be organised in a five-phase decision model. The research quality is strengthened by a structured literature review, but it can be argued that more empirical research is needed for validation. For researchers, this paper contributes with the identification of critical decisions and a model for product rollover. For practitioners, the study highlights the need to acknowledge the importance of product rollover and its role as a competitive weapon. In earlier studies, product rollover has mainly been investigated from a market perspective, so that this study contributes by investigating the issue from a manufacturing perspective.

  • 118.
    Kerkhoff, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    Kaul, Kevin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sourcing from China: A Literature Review of Motivations, Outcomes, Problems, and Solutions2017In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 226-239Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s fast changing environment and increasing customers’ demands require that companies focus on efficiency along the entire supply chain. In order to achieve competitiveness, global sourcing is a common strategy. Especially sourcing from China is an accustomed practice and the topic of discussion by various academics and practitioners. Even though this topic is discussed extensively in literature, little focus is put on motivations, outcomes, problems and solutions when sourcing from China.The purpose of this study is to explore and analyze sourcing from China sourcing with regard to motivations, achieved outcomes, experienced problems as well as solutions to the problems. The results showed that it is crucial to recognize the importance of problems that can occur during global sourcing processes. As to achieve the desired outcomes, it is vital that companies address the problems by developing appropriate solutions. Motivations, outcomes, problems and solutions contain essential aspects that have to be considered and worked upon during a global sourcing process.

  • 119.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung City 402, Taiwan.
    Chang, Tzu-Fang
    National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung City 402, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Using Binary Logit Model to Develop the Target Consumer’s Differentiation Standards for the Marketing Activities in Tea Retailers Sales Observation Method2014In: International Journal of Innovation and Learning, ISSN 1471-8197, E-ISSN 1741-8089, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 432-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to use binary logit model (BLM) to find out what kind of customer would be interested in certain types of marketingactivities in order to form the standards of sales observation model (SOM). A questionnaire, composed by demographic variables, lifestyle, and themarketing activities of two well-known tea retailers in Taiwan, has been used for data collection. The standards of SOM serve as a kind of innovation in the field of customer behaviour. It is a useful skill for learning because it helps the salesperson to reach target customers more easily .Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 120.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Chen, Chin-Yao
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Key factors affecting customers’ willingness to use mobile coupons in a restaurant setting2014In: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 13, no 3/4, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For restaurants, the provision of coupons is a usual way of attracting people to the restaurant. Today, many restaurants consider how to use mobile advertising to promote their coupons (i.e., mobile coupons) in order to attract people and enhance its popularity. The purpose of this research is to identify what factors that affect customers' willingness to use mobile coupons in a restaurant setting. Five key factors that affect customers' willingness to use mobile coupons in a restaurant setting have been identified, from a base of 14 factors regarding customers' willingness to accept mobile advertising. The identified factors include price, customisation, promotion, entertainment, and sending time. This means that when customers use mobile coupons, the five identified factors will affect their willingness to use them. Restaurants can use the identified factors as a reference, when they try to develop new marketing strategies or want to enhance the effectiveness of mobile coupons.

  • 121.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Chain-Yao, Chen
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Managing the customer waiting problem in fast food restaurants in Taiwan through reengineering of the app ordering process2014In: Proceeding of the International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. 40-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to manage the customer-waiting problem in Taiwanese fast food restaurants through reengineering of the APP ordering process.

    Design/methodology/approach: This research uses a literature review to identify different

    approaches of reengineering and use them to improve the APP ordering process used in Taiwanese fast food restaurants.

    Findings: This research has identified six approaches of reengineering, which can be applied to improve the APP ordering process in fast food restaurants. The application of thereengineering approaches, in the APP ordering process in Taiwanese fast food restaurants, generated four suggestions of how to improve the original APP ordering process.

    Research limitations/implications: The subsequent research can apply other research methods to improve the reliability and validity.

    Practical implications: The application of reengineering approaches to improve the APP ordering process in fast food restaurants can be used in other country’s food industry and be adapted to other industries as well. The research could also provide a basis for companies that want to implement the APP ordering system.

    Originality/value: This research clarifies the customer-waiting problem in the APP ordering process in Taiwanese fast food restaurants and applies reengineering approaches to improve the original APP ordering process.

  • 122.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Kuo, Yu-Hsuan
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Formulation of marketing information and communication strategies in Taiwan tourism industry2013In: Proceeding of the 2013 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 29-31 May 2013, Phuket, Thailand: Diversity, technology, and innovation for operational competitiveness / [ed] Kongkiti Phusavat, Puket, Thailand: ToKnowPress , 2013, p. 103-111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to formulate marketing information and communication (ICT) strategies for Taiwan tourism industry.

    Design/methodology/approach: This research uses a literature review to identify problems and solutions of Taiwan’s tourism industry. One of the identified problems is used as an example to formulate marketing ICT strategies.

    Findings: This research has identified twenty-five main problems and forty-eight solutions of Taiwan’s tourism industry and formulated marketing ICT strategies for one of the identified problems.

    Research limitations/implications: The subsequent research can apply other research method to improve the reliability and validity.

    Practical implications: The application of marketing ICT strategies can be used in other country’s tourism industry and be adapted to other industries as well.

    Originality/value: This research clarifies the problems of Taiwan’s tourism industry and applies marketing ICT strategies in Taiwan tourism industry.

  • 123.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Kuo, Yu-Hsuan
    National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Formulation of marketing information and communication strategies in Taiwan tourism industry2015In: International Journal of Innovation and Learning, ISSN 1471-8197, E-ISSN 1741-8089, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 250-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to formulate marketing information and communications technology (ICT) strategies for the Taiwan tourism industry. The research uses a literature review to identify 37 main problems and 57 solutions of Taiwan's tourism industry. In addition, grey relational analysis (GRA) is used to extract the most six important solutions from survey approach. For these six important solutions, marketing ICT strategies are formulated. The application of marketing ICT strategies can be used in other country's tourism industry and be adapted to other industries as well.

  • 124.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    et al.
    National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan .
    Liu, Szu-Yu
    National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan .
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    How Asian Entrepreneurs Balance Business and Family Life: A Case Study from Taiwan2015In: Proceeding of the International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, Bari, 27-29 May, 2015., 2015, p. 1049-1058Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship is one of the hottest research topics in the world and one common research area within this field is the entrepreneurial model or process. The successful entrepreneurial model in the western world is a well-discussed topic. However this model is not applicable in the Asian world due to cultural differences. In the western world, business and family life are clearly separated, but in Asia, there is no clear boundary. The aim of this study is to investigate how Asian entrepreneurs balance business and family life. The study focuses on how the entrepreneur balance business and family life in the entrepreneurial process and on identifying the most critical factors for long-term entrepreneurial success. These issues have been examined through a single case study including the Taiwanese enterprise FU NIANG FANG. This study has identified twelve key factors leading to the enterprise’s success. These key factors are: (1) Product and service innovation, (2) Mechanism to ensure service and product quality, (3) Quoted purchase, (4) Interaction with suppliers, (5) Market segmentation, (6) Value proposition, (7) Site selection, (8) Barriers to market entry and relationships with competitors, (9) Interactions with customers, (10) Talent demand, (11) Entrepreneurial team members and their experiences related to entrepreneurship in past, and (12) Venture financing. This study is explorative in nature and is limited to one company located in Taiwan. Thus, more empirical data should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.

  • 125. Lättilä, L
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Lin, B
    Hybrid simulation models: When, Why, How?2010In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 7969-7975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and System Dynamics (SD) are two popular simulation paradigms. Despite their common goal, these simulation methods are rarely combined and there has been a very low amount of joint research in these fields. However, it seems to be advantageous to combine them to create more accurate hybrid models. In this research, the possible ways to combine these methods are studied. The authors have found five different situations where it will be useful to combine these methods. All of them have already been used in earlier studies, so modelers should use them as possible interfaces to combine the methodologies. By using hybrid simulation models it is possible to create more accurate and reliable Expert Systems (ES).

  • 126.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    et al.
    SimAnalytics Oy, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kortelainen, Samuli
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, LUT School of Business and Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Assumptions for inventory modelling: insights from practice2019In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many types of models have been developed to analyse multi-echelon supply chains. These models tend to rely on certain assumptions which might be too restrictive to be used in practical applications. In this paper we present a decision support system developed for a manufacturing company to aid decision making in both manufacturing and distribution strategy. The model is based on the assumptions of the decision-makers instead of relying on a pre-existing model architecture, which guarantees that the assumptions made are not too restrictive for practical use. The decision support system is based on agent-based modelling. The model was done in close co-operation with the personnel from the case company, and emphasis was based on how the company can use the model in decision making without requiring any special expertise in developing the supply chain alternatives. By using agent-based modelling we were able to take the central assumptions into account and create a decision support system, which the supply chain manager can use to evaluate various supply chain alternatives.

  • 127. Murillo-Oviedo, A.B.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Creating market responsiveness through cross-functional integration2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Murillo-Oviedo, Ana Beatriz
    et al.
    National University of Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa Rica.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Achieving market orientation through cross-functional integration2019In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to understand how cross-functional integration contributes to the market orientation of a company that strives to increase market responsiveness. A case study in the Brazilian beverages industry was conducted and empirical data was collected through fourteen in-depth interviews from various functions within the company. The findings indicate that cross-functional integration enables the company to achieve market orientation through two main processes: product launch and customer complaints. Cross-functional integration enables a company to disseminate knowledge about organizational dynamics at both departmental and individual levels, to generate interdependency, to improve the awareness about the internal needs, and to improve the internal knowledge about the customer. This study shows that practitioners need to establish cross-functional integration, as it contributes to the market orientation of a company. Internal knowledge enables practitioners to create value through products and services, while still preserving the corporate image. It also shows that cross-functional teams and meetings are necessary to achieve market orientation in a company.

  • 129. Panova, Y.
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Prospects of nearshoring European manufacturing located in China to Russia2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Feasibility of nearshoring European manufacturing located in China to Russia2017In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze factors that support nearshoring of offshored European manufacturing located in China to Russia. The attention is paid to factors, such as labor cost, inflation, exchange rate, and labor productivity that are analyzed based on deterministic models to identify logical dependencies. This study shows that wage growth might deprive manufacturing in China from its main competitive advantage of cheap labor in the forthcoming years. The growing wage rates naturally contribute to the prime cost that is aggravated by the potential inflation, which, in turn, limit the margin in the selling price. The cumulative effect of other extra costs can aggregate such an amount that, in the foreseeable future, companies would need to relocate manufacturing to new locations. One option could be to nearshore manufacturing to Russia.

  • 131.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Emperor Alexander I St. Petersburg State Transport University.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Infrastructure project portfolios for sourcing nearshoring of manufacturing to Russia2016In: Russian Journal of Logistics and Transport Management, ISSN 2313-7002, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the growing labour cost in China, many organisations are reconsidering their offshoring decisions of manufacturing based on the deprived competitive advantage of cheap workforces. In light of these circumstances, Russia can be seen as an alternative venue with lower wages and improved governmental policy. In order to support the statement, this article provides comparative country analysis in terms of the impact of wage growth on the selling price of products. Additionally, the regulatory role in the attraction of the investments to the national economy is highlighted. In the focus are multiple communication infrastructure projects, such as dry ports, which are essential transport nodes for supporting industrial zones, where freight traffic is generated and terminated. For their development across the perspective, economic regions, the resilient investment portfolios are proposed. The inclusion of reactive and proactive strategies allows mitigating the risks and allocating transport infrastructure required for the provision of nearshoring decisions on locating manufacturers in Russia.

  • 132.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, China.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Managing supply chain risks and delays in construction project2018In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 118, no 7, p. 1413-1431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate models and methods for managing supply chain risks and delays in construction projects.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study mainly employs quantitative analysis in order to identify disruptions in construction supply chains. It also uses paradigms of simulation modeling, which are suitable for risk assessment and management. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected through a literature review and details of specific construction projects, respectively. A dynamic modeling method was used, and the model was provided with an event-based simulation. Simulation modeling was used to measure the performance of the system.

    Findings: The study shows the benefits of applying the dynamic modeling method to a construction project. Using event-based simulation, it was found that construction delays influence both the magnitude and the probability of disruption. This method contributes to the existing theoretical foundations of risk management practices, since it also considers the time factor. This method supplements the Monte Carlo statistical simulation method, which has no time representation. Using empirical analysis, the study proposes increasing the safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center, so as to mitigate risks in the construction supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: The research considers a single case of a hypothetical construction project. The simulation models represent a simple supply chain with only one supplier. The calculations are based on the current economic scenario, which will of course change over time.

    Practical implications: The outcomes of the study show that the introduction of a safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center can prevent supply chain disruption. Since the consideration of risks at all stages of construction supply chain is essential to investors, entrepreneurs and regulatory bodies, the adoption of new approaches for their management during strategic planning of the investment projects is essential.

    Originality/value: This dynamic modeling method is used in combination with the Monte Carlo simulation, thus, providing an explicit cause-and-effect dependency over time, as well as a distributed value of outcomes. 

  • 133.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Emperor Alexander I St. Petersburg State Transport University.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Роль интермодальных перевозок в национальной экономике: [The role of intermodal traffic in the national economy]2016In: Ekonomika Zheleznykh Dorog, ISSN 1727-6500, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ru]

    Результатом более чем 50-летней истории развития логистики и управления цепями поставок, в ходе которой происходил постепенный переход от дефрагментации к интеграции отдельных составляющих логистических функций, связанных с организацией интермодальных перевозок, стало сокращение числа дублируемых операций и излишних ресурсных затрат.

  • 134.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, China.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Krasinskaya, Julia
    Department of Logistics and Commerce, Faculty of Railway Operation and Logistics, Emperor Alexander i St. Petersburg State Transport University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Mitigating the break-of-gauge problem in international transportation corridors2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 124-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem at the border crossing points in international transportation corridors. This issue has been examined through a literature review. The research revealed three technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem, including trans-shipment operations, removable coach bogies and variable bogie axles. The medium-term solution would be more rapid trans-shipment operations in the railway container terminals while the long-term solution would be adjustable bogie axles. This could reduce lead-time and improve the overall productivity and competitiveness of international corridors and in turn lead to reduced logistics costs for companies using this transportation alternative.

  • 135.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical success factors for ERP system implementation: A user perspective2018In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 285-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The research was conducted in two successive steps. First, a literature review was conducted to derive CSFs for ERP system implementation. Second, a survey was conducted to evaluate the importance of these CSFs from a user perspective. Data were collected through a questionnaire that was distributed within a German manufacturer and was developed based on the CSFs found in the literature. Gray relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank the CSFs in order of importance from a user perspective.

    Findings

    The findings reveal that users regard 11 of the 13 CSFs found in the literature as important for ERP system implementation. Seven of the CFSs were classified as the most important from a user perspective, namely, project team, technical possibilities, strategic decision-making, training and education, minimum customization, software testing and performance measurement. Users regarded 2 of the 13 CSFs as not important when implementing an ERP system, including organizational change management and top management involvement.

    Research limitations/implications

    One limitation of this study is that the respondents originate from one organization, industry and country. The findings may differ in other contexts, and thus, future research should be expanded to include more organizations, industries and countries. Another limitation is that this study only evaluates existing CSFs from a user perspective rather than identifying new ones and/or the underlying reasons using more qualitative research.

    Practical implications

    A better understanding of the user perspective toward CSFs for ERP system implementation promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, a more successful implementation and a more effective operation. When trying to successfully implement an ERP system, the project team may use the insights from the user perspective.

    Originality/value

    Even though researchers highlight the important role users play during ERP system implementation, their perspective toward the widely discussed CSFs for ERP system implementation has not been investigated comprehensively. This study aims to fill this gap by evaluating CSFs derived from the literature from a user perspective.

  • 136.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mukhtar, U.
    Department of Management Sciences, GIFT University, Punjab, Pakistan.
    Implementation of enterprise resource planning systems: A user perspective2018In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering / [ed] N. Kurniati, R. S. Dewi, D. S. Dewi, D. Hartanto, N. I. Arvitrida, P. D. Karningsih, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2018, Vol. 337, no 1, article id UNSP 012049Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three Pakistani companies that recently have implemented a new ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF's level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users believe that management should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment. 

  • 137.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Mukhtar, Umer
    GIFT University, Pakistan.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: A user perspective2018In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three organizations from Pakistan that have recently implemented an ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF’s level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users of the three organizations in Pakistan believe that the implementing organization should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment.

  • 138.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment: A grey relational analysis2017In: Management Challenges in a Network Economy: Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference, Lublin, 17–19 May, 2017., ToKnowPress , 2017, p. 169-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations capabilities has been a common research area for many years and several frameworks have been offered. The existing frameworks are general and do not take specific contexts into consideration, such as a high cost environment. This research gap is of interest as a manufacturing relocation process has been taking place during the last decades, resulting in a vast amount of manufacturing being moved from high to low cost environments. The purpose of this study is to analyse critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment. A survey study was conducted, which focused on the evaluation of an existing framework of operations capabilities in the specific high cost environment context. Data was collected by a questionnaire that was developed based on the existing framework and distributed to 14 managers in five Swedish manufacturing firms. Grey relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank and cluster the dimensions and operations capabilities. The findings revealed that all the dimensions and operations capabilities included in the framework were critical in a high cost environment. However, the analysis also indicated that different emphasis was put on the different dimensions and capabilities. Thus, the dimensions and capabilities were ranked in order of critically and clustered as either ‘most critical’, ‘critical’, or ‘least critical’. The most critical dimension was ‘quality’ while the least critical dimension was ‘environment’. The critical dimensions included ‘delivery’, ‘cost’, ‘flexibility’, ‘service’ and ‘innovation’. The findings increased the validity of the framework and its usefulness in a high cost environment.

  • 139.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wewering, D.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: An end user perspective2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Framework of operations capabilities: A literature review with new insights2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates critical operations capabilities discussed in the literature. The field is constantly evolving and in need of overview. The research is based on a systematic literature review, including a final sample of 157 peer-reviewed papers. Previously, cost, flexibility, quality, delivery, and service were considered the main dimensions of critical operations capabilities. This paper also identified innovation and environment, as well as their essential capabilities. In total, 21 operations capabilities were detected. Implications include the importance of understanding the dynamics between operations capabilities and their context, and to constantly be vigilant for new trends.

  • 141.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Critical operations capabilities in high cost environment: A case study2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Critical operations capabilities for competitive manufacturing: a multiple case studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Critical operations capabilities for competitive manufacturing: A systematic review2017In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 801-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate systematically the topic of operations capabilities within the operations strategy area. The output is a framework that will benefit researchers and firms to gain a more complete understanding of critical operations capabilities.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The research methodology is a systematic literature review. The aim of this study is to provide a snapshot of the diversity of studies being conducted in the field of operations capabilities, within the operations strategy area. In total, 157 papers were taken into consideration. Various operations capabilities were identified and synthesized in a conceptual framework.

    Findings

    The output of this paper is a conceptual framework of critical operations capabilities. Different operations capabilities and dimensions were identified in the literature. In total, seven dimensions were identified and included in the framework: cost, quality, delivery, flexibility, service, innovation, and environment.

    Research limitations/implications

    This research was conducted through a systematic literature review. The framework presented in this paper provides a summary of critical operations capabilities, and in addition theoretical support for managers and firms wishing to formulate an operations strategy.

    Practical implications

    In general, this research sets the basis for managers and practitioners concerning the formulation of successful operations strategies. In the long term, a deeper understanding and shared knowledge about competitive priorities and operations capabilities can positively influence the success of firms.

    Originality/value

    This paper extends the theory by providing researchers and managers with updated knowledge on operations capabilities.

  • 144.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment: A focus group study2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment: A multiple case study2018In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering / [ed] N. Kurniati, R. S. Dewi, D. S. Dewi, D. Hartanto, N. I. Arvitrida, P. D. Karningsih, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2018, Vol. 337, no 1, article id UNSP 012065Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations capabilities have been a popular research area for many years and several frameworks have been proposed in the literature. The current frameworks do not take specific contexts into consideration, for instance a high cost environment. This research gap is of particular interest since a manufacturing relocation process has been ongoing the last decades, leading to a huge amount of manufacturing being moved from high to low cost environments. The purpose of this study is to identify critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment. The two research questions were: What are the critical operations capabilities dimensions in a high cost environment? What are the critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment? A multiple case study was conducted and three Swedish manufacturing firms were selected. The study was based on the investigation of an existing framework of operations capabilities. The main dimensions of operations capabilities included in the framework were: cost, quality, delivery, flexibility, service, innovation and environment. Each of the dimensions included two or more operations capabilities. The findings confirmed the validity of the framework and its usefulness in a high cost environment and a new operations capability was revealed (employee flexibility).

  • 147.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bengtsson, L.
    Evaluation of operations capabilities in high cost environmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Pinna, Christophe
    The University of Sheffield, UK.
    An analysis of critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment: A multiple case study2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Seno, J. P.
    et al.
    Department of Business Management, Faculdade Pitágoras de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Pimenta, M. L.
    Management and Business College, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Cross-functional interconnectedness as an enabler of customer value2019In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 821-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the processes of interconnectedness in cross-functional relationships involved in customer value enabling. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted in three Brazilian companies from different industries. The critical incident technique was used for data collection and analysis. Content analysis was used to characterize the critical incidents within functional area networks.

    Findings:

    Six main critical incidents were identified within the studied relationships: process, urgency, lack of trust, capacity and demand imbalance, motivation and challenge. The results show situations in which the collaborative behavior of the actors generates customer value facilitation.

    Research limitations/implications:

    The firms studied are small and medium, located in an emerging economy and are resource-constrained. Further research could be performed in organizations in other countries with different sizes and resources. Future studies could also include customers within the analyzed functional networks to evaluate value-in-use behavior.

    Practical implications:

    Process, as a critical incident, may be composed of several elements that could affect the processes of value creation. Moreover, the adjustment between production capacity and demand should focus on avoiding propagation of functional problems through the processes. This focus may facilitate spontaneous community behavior and customer knowledge renewal.

    Originality/value:

    This paper generates new qualitative bases to characterize the interconnectedness within functional networks within the perspective of relationship marketing. The study of the internal functions and processes revealed several particularities that are not evidenced in the extant literature, which is concentrated in relationships among companies. The quality of the relationship among the members of a functional network may affect the effectiveness of the promises of customer value, more specifically in value enabling. © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 150.
    Sequeira, Movin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical cost factors to consider in a manufacturing reshoring decision2019Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 101 - 150 of 168
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