Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 489
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, M
    Goldbart, J
    Pennington, L
    ICF in AAC2006In: Proceedings from the 12th Isaac research conference: Düsseldorf. August 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, M
    Seligman-Wine, J
    Assessment as an intervention2002In: 10th Biennial Conference of the Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Odense, Denmark, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 103.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Changing perspectives in early intervention for children with disabilities in Sweden1997In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 56-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Creating a Team Around the Child Through Professionals' Continuing Education2003In: Early intervention practices around the world, Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes , 2003, p. 171-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Early Intervention in Sweden: A Developmental Systems Perspective2004In: The Developmental Systems Approach to Early Intervention, Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company , 2004, p. 571-592Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Family involvement in assessment and intervention: Preceptions of professionals and parents in Sweden1995In: Exceptional children, ISSN 0014-4029, E-ISSN 2163-5560, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 520-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Describes perceptions of professionals and parents of the current and ideal state of family involvement in the habilitation process for children with disabilities in early intervention in Sweden. Significant discrepancies between current and ideal practices in four dimensions; Professionals' preferences for a higher degree of family involvement.

  • 107.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    ICF och delaktighet2004In: Delaktighetens språk, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 29-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Reagera och reglera: Beteendestilar hos barn med grava funktionsnedsättningar1997In: Forskare om utvecklingsstörning: perspektiv - kunskaper - utmaningar: en vänbok till Lars Kebbon, Uppsala: Uppsala Universitet , 1997, p. 52-76Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 109.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Små barns hälsa och välbefinnande2015In: Att bli förskollärare: Mångfacetterad komplexitet / [ed] Ingrid Engdahl, Eva Ärlemalm-Hagsér, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 1, p. 73-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Transatlantic Consortium on Early Childhood Intervention2003In: Mental Health and Mental Retardation: A lifespan Multidisciplinary Approach: Abstract Book from the 4th European Congress,  17 – 20th September 2003. Italy, Rome., 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF-CY as a common language in early childhood intervention : Work shop2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The workshop covers ICF-CY as a framework in collaborative problem solving together with families and in preschool. A short introduction to ICF-CY will be presented. The workshop will be based on case studies where the participants will use ICF-CY as a tool in assessment and intervention. The model for collaborative problem solving developed by the CHILD group includes problem formulations, problem explanations, goal setting, design of methods, implementation and follow-up. The tool uses checklists based on ICF-CY for formulation of difficulties and problems in terms of activity and participation, problem explanations in terms of body structures and functions and environmental factors. An individual intervention plan for a child with disability based on functioning in everyday life is developed based on the assessment. The utility and feasibility of ICF-CY as a tool and a common language in early childhood intervention will be discussed.

  • 112.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, N
    Svensk fältprövning av WHO:s Internationell klassifikation av funktionstillstånd och funktionshinder, version för barn och ungdom (ICF-CY)2006Report (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Light, J
    McNaughton, D
    Goal setting and problem solving with AAC users and families2000In: Proceedings from the Ninth Biennial Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, August 2nd-6th, 2000, Washington DC, USA., 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Olsson, C
    Collaborative problemsolving in communication intervention1996In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: European Perspectives / [ed] Stephen von Tetzchner and Mogens Hygum Jensen, London: Whurr Publishers , 1996, p. 324-341Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 115.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Assessment philosophies and practices in Sweden2000In: Interdisciplinary clinical assessment of young children with developmental disabilities, Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes , 2000, p. 391-412Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF och ICF-CY - Historik och utveckling2011In: Handbok i att använda ICF och ICF-CY / [ed] Mia Pless & Mats Granlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1:1, p. 71-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Special education: a systems theory perspective2005In: Mångsidigt samspel: en vänbok till Siv Fischbein, Stockholm: Hls Förlag , 2005, p. 41-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Early Childhood Intervention2006In: Encyclopedia of Disability, London: Sage Publications , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Åman, K
    Early Intervention and the Family System: Process and Outcome2000In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research Volume 44 Issue 3-4: New millennium research to practice : congress abstracts. 11th World Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities (IASSID): August 1-6 2000, Seattle, Washington, USA., Oxford: Blackwell Science , 2000, p. 209-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kyriazopoulou, MaryEuropean Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.Giné, ClimentUniversitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain.Bartolo, PaulEuropean Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education.
    Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment Self-Reflection Tool2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From Introduction:

    This Self-Reflection Tool was developed as part of the Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) project, conducted by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education from 2015 to 2017 (www.european-agency.org/agency-projects/inclusive-earlychildhood-education). The project’s overall goal was to identify, analyse and subsequently promote the main characteristics of quality IECE for all children. To that end, a need was detected for a tool that all professionals and staff could use to reflect on their setting’s inclusiveness, focusing on the social, learning and physical environment. This tool is intended to help improve settings’ inclusiveness.

  • 121.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lindsay, P
    Communication ...naturally. Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Research in Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Proceedings of the Fourth ISAAC Research Symposium in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Vancouver, Canada, August 11-12, 19961997Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Rydeman, B
    Zachrisson, G
    Fælles problemløsning: En metode til implementering af kommunikationshjaelpemidler2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 123.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Rydeman, B
    Zachrisson, G
    Who is in charge?2002In: 10th Biennial Conference of the Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Odense, Denmark, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 124.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The International Consortium for Early Childhood Intervention2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Transatlantic consortium for Early Childhood Intervention2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Varför behövs en barnversion av ICF?2003In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 6, p. 510-514Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Klang, Nina
    Lillvist, Anne
    The international classification of functioning, disability and health and the version for children and youth as a tool in child habilitation/early childhood intervention: feasibility and usefulness as a common language and frame of reference for practice2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early childhood intervention and habilitation services for children with disabilities operate on an interdisciplinary basis. It requires a common language between professionals, and a shared framework for intervention goals and intervention implementation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the version for children and youth (ICF-CY) may serve as this common framework and language. This overview of studies implemented by our research group is based on three research questions: Do the ICF-CY conceptual model have a valid content and is it logically coherent when investigated empirically? Is the ICF-CY classification useful for documenting child characteristics in services? What difficulties and benefits are related to using ICF-CY model as a basis for intervention when it is implemented in services? A series of studies, undertaken by the CHILD researchers are analysed. The analysis is based on data sets from published studies or master theses. Results and conclusion show that the ICF-CY has a useful content and is logically coherent on model level. Professionals find it useful for documenting children's body functions and activities. Guidelines for separating activity and participation are needed. ICF-CY is a complex classification, implementing it in services is a long-term project.

  • 128.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Åkesson, H
    Excellence in Early Childhood Intervention: Proceedings for the International symposium Excellence in Early Childhood Intervention. Mälardalen University, October 11th-12th, 19992001Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens Universitet.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination.2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiog- raphers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

    The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

    Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

    During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

    Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories e “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radio- graphic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

    The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

  • 130.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Simeonson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Will it Hurt? Verbal Interaction between Child and Radiographer during Radiographic Examination2013In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, ISSN 0882-5963, Vol. 28, no 6, p. e10-e18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the nature of verbal interactions between child, parent and radiographer and theextent to which it varied as a function of the child's age. The participants were 20 female radiographersand 32 children (3–15 years) examined for acute injuries. The verbal interactions during theexamination were video recorded and analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS).Results indicated that 80% of the verbal interaction was accounted for by the radiographer, 17% by thechild and 3% by the parent. The distribution of utterances varied with regard to children's age.

  • 131.
    Black, Melissa H.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Chen, Nigel T.M.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Iyer, Kartik K.
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Lipp, Ottmar V.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Tan, Tele
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Mechanisms of facial emotion recognition in autism spectrum disorders: Insights from eye tracking and electroencephalography2017In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 80, p. 488-515Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While behavioural difficulties in facial emotion recognition (FER) have been observed in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), behavioural studies alone are not suited to elucidate the specific nature of FER challenges in ASD. Eye tracking (ET) and electroencephalography (EEG) provide insights in to the attentional and neurological correlates of performance, and may therefore provide insight in to the mechanisms underpinning FER in ASD. Given that these processes develop over the course of the developmental trajectory, there is a need to synthesise findings in regard to the developmental stages to determine how the maturation of these systems may impact FER in ASD. We conducted a systematic review of fifty-four studies investigating ET or EEG meeting inclusion criteria. Findings indicate divergence of visual processing pathways in individuals with ASD. Altered function of the social brain in ASD impacts the processing of facial emotion across the developmental trajectory, resulting in observable differences in ET and EEG outcomes. 

  • 132.
    Boren, T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Profound intellectual and multiple disabilities2014In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 371-371Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Boren, Taylor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sweden’s LSS and social integration: An exploration of the relationship between personal assistant type, activities, and participation for children with PIMD2016In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 50-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish personal assistance system, facilitated through Swedish legislation (known as the LSS), allows children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) to receive subsidized personal assistance. This assistance may be either a hired professional from outside the family or a parent paid as a personal assistant. The type of personal assistant can impact activity selection. As noted by bio-ecological systems theory, participation in “systems” beyond the household is important for a child’s cognitive and social development, including the development of children with disabilities. The authors explored whether children’s personal assistant type (i.e., external or parental) is related to their presence in socially integrative activities (SIAs) versus non-socially integrative activities (NSIAs). The relationship between children’s activity engagement and their personal assistant type was examined via a descriptive, comparative study based on a questionnaire. Sixty families answered, providing quantitative data about personal assistance type across 56 common family activities. Children’s external assistants showed a greater presence in SIAs than children’s parental assistants, who showed a greater presence in NSIAs. The level of activity engagement between personal assistant type, however, had a less direct relationship. In accordance with bio-ecological systems theory, activity selection can influence the child’s cognitive and social development. Ultimately, this study suggests that external assistants partake in more SIAs than parental assistants, likely as a function of providing respite for families. This respite stems from the LSS’s implicit role for external personal assistants to also serve as relief for parents. In turn, by facilitating exposure to broader systems, these external assistants can play a critical role in children’s social and cognitive development.

  • 134. Bornman, Juan
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Facilitating change in early childhood intervention by using principles from systems theory: an interventionist’s perspective2007In: South African Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0038-2337, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All interventions have one aspect in common – the pursuit of positive change, ie, moving towards a particular intervention goal. In intervention both sudden changes and long-term changes are necessary – sudden changes act as an incentive to carry on with intervention as the “effect of intervention” is quickly seen, whilst longer term changes are important for maintenance and mastery of particular skills. The purpose of this article is to explore both types of change from a systems theory perspective. Bifurcation points, stabilising central attractors (SCA) and functional and structural linkages are used to explain sudden change, whilst equifinality and self-stabilisation are explained with reference to long-term change. This article concludes by pointing to specific implications for intervention when using systems theory as the framework.

  • 135. Brodin, J
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Methodological Issues in Research in Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Proceedings from the First ISAAC Research Symposium in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Stockholm August 16th to 17th, 19901991Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 136. Brodin, J
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, EvaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Methodological Issues in Research in Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Proceedings from the Third ISAAC Research Symposium in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Kerkrade, the Netherlands, October 14 to 15th, 19941994Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Brodin, Jane
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children in Risky Environments and Life Situations2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken fokuserar på barn i utsatta livssituationer och miljöer.

  • 138.
    Brodin, Jane
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Sweden: Children in unsafe environments and life situations2014In: Children Violence and Bullying: International perspectives / [ed] J. Merrick, I. Kandel, & H.A. Omar (Eds.), New York: Nova Science Publishers Inc. , 2014, 1, p. 115-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Renblad, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research.
    Communication support in preschool by reading aloud: Factors influencing student's reading skills (Thematic session)2014In: CEA 2014: 12th Conference on Educational Assessment: Program – Abstracts / [ed] Erzsébet Korom, Attila Pász, Szeged, Ungern: Gold Press Nyomda kft , 2014, p. 83-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary of abstract: The mission of the Swedish preschool is to stimulate children's learning and development in a holistic. No other period in child development contains so much learning as the first five years in life. The presentation is based on the projetct Let's read a book and focus on reading aloud. The results show that all children appreciated reading aloud and story telling and the assessment showed that the quality of their communication was raised by these efforts. The children's interest in signs, symbols, pictures and letter increased and they improved their vocabulary, their understanding of language and their phonological awareness. The project was presented on an internationla  conference in ECE and also published in proceedings.

  • 140.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Renblad, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Preschool Education Research.
    Does the quality in preschool affect children's health and wellbeing?2014In: International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health, ISSN 1939-5930, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the long tradition in the social welfare field the number of children in Sweden who do not feel well has increased. This statement is based on reports from preschool teachers and includes young children (1-5 years old). The purpose of this article is to stress the present situation and what can be done to better work to raise healthy and secure children who also feel well. The aim is to discuss how the quality in preschool affects children’s wellbeing? Quality does not only mean happy children and satisfied parents but also competent staff with positive attitudes and systematic quality work. It appears from research that enough time for pedagogical planning and follow-up, small child groups, high teacher density and low staff turnover are also essential. The results also show that the most critical aspects for supporting children’s health and development are quality improvements based on equality, an efficient value system, a useful curriculum, scientifically based teacher training and a school/preschool for all.

  • 141.
    Bölte, Sven
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coghill, David
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Gau, Susan Shur -Fen
    National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Holtmann, Martin
    University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Rohde, Luis A.
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Segerer, Wolfgang
    Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Switzerland.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifcations in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Standardised assessment of functioning in ADHD: consensus on the ICF Core Sets for ADHD2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1261-1281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with significant impairments in social, educational, and occupational functioning, as well as specific strengths. Currently, there is no internationally accepted standard to assess the functioning of individuals with ADHD. WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health—child and youth version (ICF) can serve as a conceptual basis for such a standard. The objective of this study is to develop a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief ICF Core Sets for ADHD. Using a standardised methodology, four international preparatory studies generated 132 second-level ICF candidate categories that served as the basis for developing ADHD Core Sets. Using these categories and following an iterative consensus process, 20 ADHD experts from nine professional disciplines and representing all six WHO regions selected the most relevant categories to constitute the ADHD Core Sets. The consensus process resulted in 72 second-level ICF categories forming the comprehensive ICF Core Set—these represented 8 body functions, 35 activities and participation, and 29 environmental categories. A Common Brief Core Set that included 38 categories was also defined. Age-specific brief Core Sets included a 47 category preschool version for 0–5 years old, a 55 category school-age version for 6–16 years old, and a 52 category version for older adolescents and adults 17 years old and above. The ICF Core Sets for ADHD mark a milestone toward an internationally standardised functional assessment of ADHD across the lifespan, and across educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings. © 2018 The Author(s)

  • 142.
    Bölte, Sven
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vries, Petrus J. de
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Robison, John E.
    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, USA.
    Shulman, Cory
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Swedo, Susan
    National Institute of Mental Health, USA.
    Tonge, Bruce
    Monash University, Australia.
    Wong, Virginia
    The University of Hong Kong, China.
    Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Segerer, Wolfgang
    Swiss Paraplegic Research, Switzerland.
    Selb, Melissa
    Swiss Paraplegic Research, Switzerland.
    The Gestalt of functioning in autism spectrum disorder: Results of the international conference to develop final consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets2018In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorder is associated with diverse social, educational, and occupational challenges. To date, no standardized, internationally accepted tools exist to assess autism spectrum disorder–related functioning. World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can serve as foundation for developing such tools. This study aimed to identify a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. Four international preparatory studies yielded in total 164 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health candidate categories. Based on this evidence, 20 international autism spectrum disorder experts applied an established iterative decision-making consensus process to select from the candidate categories the most relevant ones to constitute the autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. The consensus process generated 111 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories in the Comprehensive Core Set for autism spectrum disorder—one body structure, 20 body functions, 59 activities and participation categories, and 31 environmental factors. The Common Brief Core Set comprised 60 categories, while the age-appropriate core sets included 73 categories in the preschool version (0- to 5-year-old children), 81 in the school-age version (6- to 16-year-old children and adolescents), and 79 in the older adolescent and adult version (⩾17-year-old individuals). The autism spectrum disorder Core Sets mark a milestone toward the standardized assessment of autism spectrum disorder–related functioning in educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings.

  • 143.
    Cameron, David Lansing
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Persson, Bengt
    Department of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    School district administrators' perspectives on special education policy and practice in Norway and Sweden2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 212-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine special education policy and practice from the perspective of school district administrators in Norway and Sweden. Administrators from 266 Norwegian and 262 Swedish municipalities completed a survey concerning: (a) reasons children need special education, (b) common and desired organizational solutions, and (c) the influence of policy on practice. Despite a number of clear differences, findings suggest that Swedish and Norwegian administrators share similar attitudes regarding the provision of special education support. It appears that in both countries inclusive practices are seen as the ideal, yet, Norwegian administrators appear to have a stronger preference for categorical or segregated solutions. However, this finding must be viewed in light of current practices in each country. In particular, we take into consideration data indicating that 17% of Swedish students receive special educational support, as compared to approximately 6% in Norway.

  • 144.
    Carlberg, Louise
    et al.
    Hälsa och Habilitering, Region Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Schools are expected to be an environment where children can reach their fullest potential and develop their talents, personality, as well as their mental and physical abilities. Children with disabilities often have restricted participation and lower achievement in school. The aim is to investigate if there are any differences in participation and achievement in school between adolescents, with and without self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities, and to explore the relations between achievement and participation. 

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out based on data collected from 1520 adolescents in the sixth and seventh grade, from the south of Sweden. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between having a neuropsychiatric disability, with participation and achievement, and how different factors affected this relationship. 

    Results: Having a self-reported neuropsychiatric disability increases the likelihood of having restricted participation (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–4.23) and lower achievement in school (AOR: 2.94; 95% CI: 2.06–4.24). These adolescents were also more likely to have negative relationships to their teachers, be bullied, have poorer connectedness to their parents, come from families with less money, be trying drugs and be male, in comparison to the adolescents without a neuropsychiatric disability. The odds of having lower achievement increased with lower engagement and absenteeism from class. 

    Conclusions: Adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities have a disadvantaged situation in school, and are exposed to factors that could have long-term negative effects. More longitudinal research is required to conclude what factors are causing restricted participation and low achievement.

  • 145. Carlhed, Carina
    et al.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Parent Perspectives on Early Intervention: The Paradox of Needs and Rights2003In: British Journal of Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0969-7950, Vol. 49, no 97, p. 69-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article was to discuss conceptions of support in relation to needs and rights based models in early intervention in Sweden, as perceived by parents of young children with disabilities. The discussion is illustrated with data collected by in-depth interviewing of eight parents and analysing the results using a qualitative approach. The theoretical frame is based on empowerment and the data are discussed in relation to this theory. The paradoxical effects of need fulfilment and empowerment that arise in parent-professional interaction are highlighted. This indicates a need for future research about the sometimes conflicting tasks of fulfilling needs and providing proactive support which professionals find in their encounters with parents of children with disabilities. Collaboration in the intervention process based on expertise of both parents and professionals is discussed in relation to these conflicts.

  • 146.
    Castro, Susana
    et al.
    School of Education, University of Roehampton, London, UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The relationship between classroom quality-related variables and engagement levels in Swedish preschool classrooms: a longitudinal study2017In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 122-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child engagement has been defined as active participation in classroom routines, appropriate interactions with the environment and it also predicts academic achievement. Therefore, it is necessary to identify predictors of engagement over time. Moreover, cross-cultural data is needed to provide a global picture of the quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) across countries. This study aims to describe the quality of Swedish preschool classrooms and its relationship with students’ engagement over time. Data was collected from 165 preschool teachers in 55 preschool units in Sweden. Results show that all classroom-related variables (Emotional Support, Instructional Support and Classroom Organisation) have increased levels over time, while engagement remained stable. Three groups of preschool classroom units were identified with similar patterns of classroom quality over time (higher emotional support and lower instructional practice) and similar differences in level. Emotional Support was found to be the best predictor of student engagement over time.

  • 147.
    Celic, Katarina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Teacher and parents implemented interventions targeting symbolic play of preschool aged children with Autism spectrum disorder2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The estimated prevalence of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 2007 was approximately 6,5-6,6 per 1000 children. Symbolic play is, one of the diagnostic criteria in the cases of ASD. In preschool, symbolic play is predominant form of play. However, children with ASD show lower levels of symbolic play. It takes them more time to start with symbolic play and have problems in performance of it. Nevertheless, they might even never develop symbolic play skills. The need for interventions targeting symbolic play of children with ASD is increasing. Generally speaking, there appear to be very limited number of symbolic play interventions for children with ASD. Even if done, most have been performed in laboratory conditions. The interventions that have been undertaken to support symbolic play have taken form of being child centered, peer mediated or adult mediated, with emphasized role of caregivers as interventionists. The aim of this systematic literature review is to address parents and teachers implemented interventions targeting symbolic play of preschool aged children with ASD, with an emphasis on characteristics of these interventions and pretend play sequences. Findings reveal that interventions implemented by either parents or teachers in natural environment give positive outcomes in terms of symbolic play and its instances of preschool aged children with ASD. The review presented a limited number of studies dealing with this kind of interventions. Since all interventions show that symbolic play can be facilitated in this population, special attention should be payed to the methods used to improve symbolic play behaviours and defining and dividing symbolic play. More focus should be put on implementing interventions targeting symbolic play of children with ASD by caregivers, i.e. parents and teachers, in natural context. Inclusion of peers in these kinds of interventions emerges as possible and potentially successful as well.The estimated prevalence of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 2007 was approximately 6,5-6,6 per 1000 children. Symbolic play is, one of the diagnostic criteria in the cases of ASD. In preschool, symbolic play is predominant form of play. However, children with ASD show lower levels of symbolic play. It takes them more time to start with symbolic play and have problems in performance of it. Nevertheless, they might even never develop symbolic play skills. The need for interventions targeting symbolic play of children with ASD is increasing. Generally speaking, there appear to be very limited number of symbolic play interventions for children with ASD. Even if done, most have been performed in laboratory conditions. The interventions that have been undertaken to support symbolic play have taken form of being child centered, peer mediated or adult mediated, with emphasized role of caregivers as interventionists. The aim of this systematic literature review is to address parents and teachers implemented interventions targeting symbolic play of preschool aged children with ASD, with an emphasis on characteristics of these interventions and pretend play sequences. Findings reveal that interventions implemented by either parents or teachers in natural environment give positive outcomes in terms of symbolic play and its instances of preschool aged children with ASD. The review presented a limited number of studies dealing with this kind of interventions. Since all interventions show that symbolic play can be facilitated in this population, special attention should be payed to the methods used to improve symbolic play behaviours and defining and dividing symbolic play. More focus should be put on implementing interventions targeting symbolic play of children with ASD by caregivers, i.e. parents and teachers, in natural context. Inclusion of peers in these kinds of interventions emerges as possible and potentially successful as well.

  • 148.
    Celic, Katarina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Through the parents' and educators' eyes: Play of preschool aged children in need of special support2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Play is the primary activity of childhood. It is connected to other areas of child’s development, therefore through play, children improve skills and abilities. The most common categorization of play is into the developmental and social aspect of play. The highest level of play is achieved when the true social play occurs. The ideal setting for social play to occur is early childhood education and care (ECEC) institutions. ECEC in Croatia is striving for inclusion of children with difficulties/special needs, as stated in Croatian ECEC leading documents. In this study, these children will be referred to as children in need of special support since is perceived that name reflects the bio-psycho-social model of disability that recognizes issues in child´s functioning, apart from the child itself, coming from the environment. All the services, for children in need of special support, including ECEC are disability-based. It has been found that children in need of special support experience problems during play which affects other domains of development.

    The purpose of the study is to investigate play of children in need of special support and the factors, i.e., facilitators and barriers for their play. Play of the children in need of special support is chosen to be explored through the perception of their parents and educators with the use of the grounded theory approach. After collecting data through interviews and preformed data analysis, characteristics of play children in need of special support display together with the factors that affect play positively or negatively emerged. Factors were found to affect children’s play directly or indirectly. The most outstanding facilitators for children’s play were found to be the parents’ and educators’ actions and attitudes regarding the importance of play. The most substantial barriers were found to lie in the children’s characteristics concerning play which were tended to be perceived as consequences of their difficulties and diagnosis-based educational and social systems. Furthermore, the schooling system forcing ECEC institutions to focus on early preparedness for academic success, putting play aside emerged as a notable barrier for the play.

  • 149.
    Chee, Derserri Yan-Ting
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia , Australia.
    Lee, Hoe Chung-yeung
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia , Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Barnett, Tania
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia , Australia.
    Falkmer, Olov
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain.
    Siljehav, Jessica
    Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Viewpoints on driving of individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Understanding the viewpoints of drivers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is crucial in the development of mobility support and driver training that is responsive to their needs. Methods: Fifty young adults with ASD and fifty seven typically developed adults participated in the study to form a contrasting group. Q-methodology was used to understand viewpoints on driving as a main mode of transportation. Data were analysed using a PQ by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results: Although some ASD participants perceived themselves as confident and independent drivers, others preferred other modes of transportation such as public transport and walking. Anxiety was also found to be a barrier to driving. The contrast group revealed consistent viewpoints on their driving ability. They preferred driving as their main mode of transportation and believed that they were competent, safe and independent drivers. Conclusion: These results are important in the planning of transport policies and driver training for individuals with ASD. Driver training manuals can be developed to address anxiety issues, hazard perception and navigation problems in the ASD population. Their use of public transport could be further facilitated through more inclusive transport policies.

  • 150.
    Clement, Jill
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Support strategies that promote parenting skills for parents with intellectual disabilities: A systematic literature review2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
1234567 101 - 150 of 489
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf