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  • 101.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Innovationer och Svensk Export: en pilotstudie2006Report (Other academic)
  • 102. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nya perspektiv på distributionens omvandling?2003Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 103. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Hertz, SusanneJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).Sweet, S
    Perspectives on Market Networks: Boundaries and new connections2005Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 104.
    Andreasson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Andersson, Emma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Petersson, Jens
    JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Att sätta segel i ett av världens största sportevenemang: En studie av begrepp, motiv och utvärdering av sponsring2005Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem. Sponsorship has increased continuously during the 21st century, however, at the same time the public interest of traditional promotion has been diminishing. The meaning of sponsorship is a very diffuse and therefore the concept needs to be investigated. Due to the multitude of sponsorship and its impreciseness about its financial value, it is difficult to evaluate sponsorship for companies, especially when there is a difficulty in choosing a decent method for evaluation.

    Purpose. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the concept of sponsorship, motives for sponsorship and evaluation of sponsorship according to the theory and give empirical examples of how these areas are being managed by companies.

    Method. On the basis of the purpose, a qualitative method was chosen with personal interview and telephone interviews as tools. The choice of method and tool was based on the demand for rich and deep information, since this was needed to solve the purpose. Volvo Event Management, SEB, Assa Abloy and Djuice were the sample of the thesis, and have all been involved in sponsoring of the Volvo Ocean Race.

    Results. The concept of sponsorship has no universal definition, though it is important that companies understand the concept. By stating some cornerstones of the definition it might help explaining the problem and the indistinctness with sponsorship. Sponsorship as a communication tool is unique and therefore makes it possible for companies to differentiate on the market, since the public is getting tired on traditional promotion. Additionally, there are numerous motives to use sponsorship, but exposure is one of the most common according to the participating companies in this study, closely followed by relations. Motives can further on be categorized in two different groups, internal and external, which simplify and give a better perspective of companies’ motives. Finally, the study has shown that companies evaluate sponsorship using different theoretical tools, however, according to literature and theorists companies are not evaluating. Hence, a disagreement arises between the academic and the real world. In spite of the progression that has been made, there are still doubts concerning the trustworthiness surrounding the translation of exposure to a financial value, which contributes to that the value of sponsorship becomes more uncertain.

  • 105.
    Appelqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Harplinger, Henrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kindqvist, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fairtrade - A fair trademark for ICA and Lidl?2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate if and how the presence of Fairtrade promotion can change the attitude towards the stores, ICA and Lidl.

    Background: People‟s attitude towards the brand Fairtrade is predominantly positive and by providing these socially beneficial products, stores wish to strengthen their brand image by communicating their social responsibility through the message of Fairtrade. Previous research has shown that the socially responsible actions of a company can result in an enhanced brand attitude, but also in some cases, the actions taken have had a diminished effect on the attitude towards a brand. It is therefore of interest to research which stores that can gain from Fairtrade promotions in terms of an improved attitude towards the brand.

    Method: To answer the purpose, a mixed method sequential explanatory design was applied, by collecting quantitative data from an experiment, and qualitative data from a follow-up interview. The emphasis was put on the quantitative phase, where four different experimental groups were manipulated with different internet advertisement; ICA and Lidl, with the presence and absence of Fairtrade promotion.

    Conclusion: The outcome of the study signified that the attitude towards Lidl was somewhat negative with the absence of Fairtrade and declined with the presence of Fairtrade promotion while the attitude towards ICA did not change regardless of promotion. The results indicate that Fairtrade can not be successfully used as a system of changing brand attitude of a store, if customers do not consider it to be congruent with the initial brand image. It is supported that consistency is the key to success for a brand to be believable and enhance the brand attitude.

  • 106.
    Armanto, Elina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Cassel, Maja
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Institutional Pressure & Industrial Wisdom: How industrial wisdom in the Swedish car dealer industry has been affected by the 1400/2002 motor vehicle block exemption2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of a new motor vehicle block exemption began in 2002, and affected the car dealer industry in Sweden. Before this new regulation, a general agent distributing cars to dealers had the ability to restrict car dealers’ behavior much more. Nowadays, dealers have the right to sell different brands from the same showroom, even if there are strict rules about how the different brands should be presented. The new block exemption have also given car dealers possibilities to establish in other places within EU were selective distribution is applied.

    As the environment changed (by the block exemption), dealers faced new information that required interpretation. In this thesis we have focused on industrial wisdom; a reasonable and consistent, yet subjective, sense-making of reality in an industry. This sense-making is a way to understand and justify company behavior; resulting assumptions are considered so basic that they remain unquestioned by industry participants. However, interpretations depend on who makes them; different persons interpret things in different ways.

    In the light of the car dealer industry and the motor vehicle block exemption 1400/2002, this thesis investigated if change due to institutional pressure can affect industrial wisdom. Further, what does this process look like.

    To fulfill our purpose we conducted a qualitative research by interviewing 19 Chief Executive Officers from the car dealer industry in Sweden. The sample was designed by a maximum variation sampling technique, in which we as researchers used our own judgment to pick cases that were extra informative. Before we conducted the interviews, we reviewed literature to gain a general understanding of the industry and relevant issues.

    From our research we know that industrial wisdom can change due to a shift in institutional pressure and we observed that the car dealer industrial wisdom was changing. There are some new perceptions and aspects of wisdom, which suggest that the industry has moved away from previous equilibrium. Nevertheless, perceptions are diverse in a number of areas and thoughts have not been translated into action, which leaves much potential for further change. Naturally, this is a slow and difficult process since cognitive maps are embedded in a mindset that relies on previous experience and automatic interpretations. If wisdom changes more depends a great deal on if/how dealers (continue to) act.

    This thesis resulted in a model (The Loop of Wisdom) that explains how a change in institutional pressure affects industrial wisdom. New information enters the company, gets interpreted, acted upon and feeds back out to the environment, which affect other companies and the industry as a whole.

  • 107.
    Arregle, Jean-Luc
    et al.
    University of Luxemburg.
    Mari, Isabelle
    EDHEC.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Board Creation and Composition in Family Firms: A Conflict-resolution Perspective2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Arvidsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Fransson, Lena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Lundgren, Carin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Communication of Values: A Qualitative Study at Stena Metall2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate Stena Metall’s values and how they are communicated within the organization.

    Background: In the Fall of 2008, the world was shocked by the worst financial crisis in decades. The crisis had deep effects on the Swedish economy, and many companies suffered heavily. The recycling and environmental service company Stena Metall experienced their first negative result in 30 years, and 900 employees had to leave the company. An action program, including an altered culture was established with the purpose to adapt the operations to the new business environmental conditions. Values, which are a part of the organizational culture, were decided to be an important part of the change. To implement these in the entire organization a well-structured communication process is needed. Within these subjects; values and communication, a qualitative study at Stena Metall has been conducted.

    Method: To fulfill the purpose, a qualitative method has been used. Thirteen interviews were conducted to collect data from different levels of the organization. The interviews were designed differently based on the employee’s level of responsibility in the organization. The theoretical framework used when analyzing the empirical material includes earlier research in the areas of culture, with emphasis on values, and communication.

    Conclusion: Two set of values have been identified, core values and aspiration values. The findings indicate a gap in the communicational process at Stena Metall. Part of the new information communicated about Stena Metall´s values is lost on its way from the management to the lower levels in the organization. The perception of what the values mean, both core and aspiration values, differs depending on level in the organization.

  • 109.
    Aygören, Huriye
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Ansal, Hacer
    Işık Üniversitesi.
    Ekmekçi, Umut
    Istanbul Technical University.
    Is it possible to define a universal technology management discipline?2009In: Iktisat Isletme ve Finans, ISSN 1300-610X, Vol. 24, no 281, p. 9-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering the diversity of needs and concerns in developed and developing countries, the evolution of technology management (TM) discipline would be expected to follow different paths to include different national experiences and unique needs of these countries. Whether this diversity is reflected in the mainstream TM research agenda is an important issue. Thus, the aim of this study is in two folds; first, to examine how the general research agenda of TM discipline has evolved in the academic research in a developing country context, namely Turkey, and next, whether this research agenda has converged or diverged with the patterns of mainstream TM research in international journals, by analyzing the Turkish academics’s TM publications both in the national and international scientific journals. The findings reveal that the TM discipline in Turkey indicates both divergent and convergent characteristics when compared with the results of recent studies about developed and developing countries.

  • 110.
    Aygören, Huriye
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Phan, Phil
    John Hopkins University.
    Trevinyo-Rodríguez, Rosa Nelly
    Tec de Monterrey.
    Entrepreneurship and Social Responsibility: A Review and a Research Agenda2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Bador, Aida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Low Pei San, Sarah
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Manouchi, Meriem
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Cause-Related Marketing: How Swedish fashion retailers increase purchase intentions by doing good2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate what factors are important when implementing cause-related marketing within the Swedish fashion retail market, in order to change the purchase intention of customers. Cause-related marketing (CRM) is a widely used marketing tool within the Swedish fashion industry. There has been an increasing trend of using cause-related marketing as part of corporate social responsibility strategy. Companies increasingly believe that associating their corporate identity with good causes can be an effective marketing tool. There is limited research about CRM with a bearing on the Swedish market and the fashion industry. This has given the authors an interesting field for research and analysis.

    A quantitative method was used to collect primary data. A survey was conducted among customers of H&M, Lindex, Mango and Indiska. These companies were chosen after the observation of a large amount of Swedish based fashion retailers and their involvement within CRM. The results indicate that there is a link between cause-related marketing and customer purchase intentions. CRM campaigns have positive effects on customers by increasing their purchase intentions. Marketing communication, price, customer attitude and fit are important factors that affect the purchase of CRM products. A further investigation can be useful for companies and researchers in the field of marketing strategies.

  • 112.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Edebol, Johannes
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Radio Frequency Identification: Evaluationg supply chain benefits from a financial perspective2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Context. This thesis takes an opportunity perspective. Radio Frequency Identification technology (RFID) has showed potential in enhancing and optimizing supply chains. For Pan Nordic Logistics (PNL), this represents an interesting opportunity and a possibility to enhance goods flow, increase quality, and gain competitive advantage.

    The study. This study has looked at how RFID could benefit PNL. A number of opportunities have been identified. Of these opportunities, the ‘Hub’ in Jönköping has been analyzed in further detail. The current logistics process has been mapped out in order to determine where in the logistics process the technology could have the optimal impact. Since it is not possible to perform a full financial evaluation without benchmarking and measuring the effects of RFID, a framework have been provided for future measurement, evaluation, and implementation.

    Findings and recommendations. This study concludes that an RFID implementation at the ‘Hub’ in Jönköping is ‘most likely’ to be financially feasible. RFID is a promising technology that should be taken to the next level. A small-scale implementation is recommended in order to ‘try out’ the technology and to fully evaluate how it could be adapted to fit existing solutions of PNL such as computer systems. If implemented, this trial should serve to map out the financial side of the technology using the provided framework. It is currently neither possible, nor feasible to fully understand the financial impact of the technology. Such a forecast would be imprecise and possible misleading.

  • 113.
    Bergqvist, Eric
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Sargezi, Elina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Ambience: Is Ambience in Swedish Clothing Retail Stores a Missed Opportunity?2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nowadays, customers tend to take product quality and positive brand image for granted, which makes the formation of a new marketing strategy even more vital. In an age characterized by information overload and lack of time, factors such as emotional, cognitive or symbolic values become increasingly valuable in marketing. In contrast to American retail clothing stores such as Abercrombie & Fitch, who to a large extent use ambience as a strategic approach, the authors have not experienced as strong ambience strategies among Swedish retail stores. Therefore, the authors want to investigate if Swedish retailers make use of ambience as a strategic marketing approach and how the ambience is perceived by the consumers.

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore if and how ambience (lighting, fragrance and music) is used as a strategic marketing approach by retailers in Sweden and how the ambience is perceived by the consumers. In addition the authors will examine if the consumers’ perception of the current ambience is reflected in their in-store behaviour (willingness to browse and willingness to buy).

    Method: In order to fulfil the purpose, a mixed method of explanatory and descriptive design was chosen, by collecting quantitative data in the form of a survey and qualitative data through interviews. The questionnaire consisted of 91 respondents from JC, Carlings and Dressmann. Interviews with store-managers from JC, Carlings and Dressmann were also conducted in order to reflect if and how the current ambience is used as a marketing approach.

    Conclusion: Swedish retail stores use the ambience merely as a means for creating a pleasant store environment. The perceived atmosphere varies for different customers. The three ambient factors, lighting, music and fragrance, differed in level of importance for the three chosen stores. One conclusion drawn from this is that the age-group plays an important role in how the ambience is perceived. The results show that there is a positive relationship between the consumers’ perception of the ambience, their feelings and in-store behaviour; within all three stores. This indicates that if the positive feelings increase in intensity, so will the consumers’ willingness to browse and their willingness to buy from the store. As a conclusion, Swedish retails should consciously use ambience as a strategic marketing approach to intentionally affect the consumers’ willingness to browse and buy.

  • 114.
    Bergqvist, Jimmy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Ingelstedt, Jens
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Advertorials; an effective or destructive marketing practice?: The effect of advertorial deception on irritation, credibility, and attitude, both for the advertiser and the advertising medium2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis explores advertorials, advertising made to look like editorial content, from a consumer behaviour perspective.

    Introduction                 Consumers are exposed to a staggering amount of advertisements each day. This so-called advertising clutter makes it difficult for marketers to reach the consumer. Therefore, in the late 1980’s marketers started to use unconventional ways of advertising. One of these was the use of advertorials, a form of advertising that borrows the appearance and other features from editorial material.

    Problem discussion       Since advertorials are made to look like editorial material, but is in reality an advertisement, it is of interest for researchers and practicing marketers alike to know what effects using them has on the brand. Previous research differ in the view on advertorials; some claim that it is a good way to advertise as it is seen as less intrusive and irritating, while others say that the deceptiveness makes people irritated.

    Purpose                        Through a quantitative case study of Aftonbladet.se, a Swedish news website, from a consumer perspective analyze the effects the level of deception of online advertorials have on 1) brand credibility, and 2) the irritation level, on both the medium and the advertiser. Also, 3) to thereafter examine if possible alterations in irritation and brand credibility trigger changes in brand attitudes towards medium and advertiser.

    Background                  Newspapers have long been dependent on the revenue from advertisement sales, even more so since the emergence of free newspapers and news web sites. With this in mind, the importance of advertorials stands clear. In the on-line world, where readers jump from article to article and from site to site, the advertorials play an important role in “catching” the reader and make him/her stay on the site. Moreover, advertorials is one of the formats of on-line advertising which commands the highest revenues.

    Frame of reference        The on-line context provides additional ways of deceiving a consumer, in comparison with print media. Therefore, the frame of reference focuses on previous research on the effects the deception can have with a consumer and the perception of the brands included; irritation, brand credibility, brand attitude, likeliness to return to site, and advertising avoidance. For later testing, 11 hypotheses were defined.

    Method                        The study uses a mixed method approach, with both quantitative and qualitative data. An experiment, with one control group and two different manipulations formed the basis for the data collection. 19 out of the 103 participants in the quantitative study were asked to participate in the qualitative study as well.

    Analysis                        As the distribution of the data was found not to be normal, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to test the hypotheses. All hypotheses but one were accepted. Further, to explore the relationship between variables, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was also performed.

    Conclusion                   It was not possible to prove that a higher level of blend-in decreased credibility of any of the two brands, neither does induce more irritation. It was also not possible to discern a statistically significant effect on the attitude towards the brands, likeliness to return to Aftonbladet.se, or future avoidance of adverts by Volvo. However, several of the participants of the interviews expressed concern over the long-term effects the use of advertorials may have on the brand of Volvo. Further, advertorials are definitely highly deceptive, and almost half of the respondents did not realize they were reading an advert even at the lowest level of blend-in, which is currently used by Aftonbladet.se and Volvo.

  • 115.
    Bergqvist, Jimmy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Wolf, Henrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Stigson, Gustav
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    From monopoly to private pharmacies: Buy-out and franchising: Finding the entrepreneur within the pharmacist2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of Sweden’s most well known monopolies is approaching its end, Apoteket AB. A re-regulation of a state owned monopoly is nothing new but it happens within an interesting trade. Since the government is in total control of the whole re-regulation process, we found it interesting to see how they managed to include the potential individuals who want to take over a pharmacy. After all, many are the times the government has emphasized the importance of small firms.

    Out of the approximately 900 pharmacies owned by Apoteket AB, 150 are going to be sold to individuals. This group is called “small enterprise cluster”, and this cluster became the focus of our thesis. We wanted to get an insight into this group, since it is more complex and diverse compared to the large corporations entering the market.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to measure the willingness to take over pharmacies among the employees of Apoteket AB, as well as to analyse how the government's support has affected the decisions of individuals.

    Method

    In order to get a good view of the re-regulation process we chose a qualitative approach, where we performed personal interviews with 6 respondents equally spread out on 3 pharmacies in a medium sized Swedish city and the surrounding area. The interviews where performed in a semi-structured manner.

    Besides the primary data, secondary data was collected. It builds the foundation for the theoretical framework and the analysis of the interviews. Since the theoretical framework was created before the research was performed, the study used a deductive research approach.

  • 116.
    Bergström, Karl
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Landgren, Jens
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Müntzing, Felix
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brand Management: A qualitative study on branding in a SME2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how branding is exercised in a SME and to develop a model for how SMEs can implement branding. This means that we will especially focus on aspects that are important for a SME when building and strengthening a brand.

     

    Background When looking at the concept of brand management, the wide range of literature gives examples of corporations such as Nike, Coca-Cola, and Apple who have been successful in the field. It rarely talks about how SMEs deal with branding, if at all. Brand management in SMEs has been widely overlooked, despite that a vast majority of the companies are SMEs. There are as mentioned obstacles when working with brand management in SMEs, but the existing literature is mainly focusing on how larger organizations should implement brand management and the benefits of doing so. We argue that there is lack of existing literature on how SMEs should implement branding.

     

    Method To fulfill the purpose, a qualitative method was chosen. The study was done within a SME, Triumf Glass, where eight people were interviewed in a semi-structured way. This was done to investigate how branding is excercised in a SME.

    Conclusion The outcome of the study is a model that describes the process we believe to be necessary for a SME to go through when building and strengthening its brand. The model consists of the phases brand essence, brand reflection and brand strategy which result in brand equity.

  • 117.
    Besong, Fred Tanyi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    BUSINESS PLAN: Import, Export and Car Trading Company2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Being entrepreneurial is pathly being creative. This Master thesis presents a business plan of BEFCO Trading Ltd geared towards solving a problem in the Cameroonian Economy. The English speaking Cameroonians of South West and North West provinces of Cameroon are presently underserved with car sales offerings as there is presently no registered Company in this section of the Country.

    An attempt is presently being made through this business plan thanks to the peaceful and favourable circumstances sorrounding the entrepreneurs and the opportunity gap of a niche market. The business plan shows a win to win situation in which the founding entrepreneurs become self employed by solving a problem in the market through novel business combinations.

  • 118.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ericsson, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Hall, Annika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Haag, Kajsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ägarskiften och ledarskiften i företag: En fördjupad analys2004Book (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    An innovative organization or organi­zing innovatively after a merger?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the post-merger integration process voices expressing a need for innova­tion was heard. What was the reason for this change of focus in the organization and why did they use the concept innovation? This paper is based on a study of a merger between a Finnish and a Swedish company. Both companies had historically been family com­panies but one of them was listed on the Stockholm Stock Exchange in 1993 which had changed the business logic in the organization. When talking to the managers after the merger they referred to cultures to explain problematic issues. In this paper, the frame concept is used to analyze organizational cultures, and to compare them with the notion of an innovative organization. It turned out that the two pre-merger organizational cultures had stronger innovative features, compared to the culture in the new, merged company. This is followed by a suggestion that innovation should be seen as a method for integration, rather than a goal for the new organization.

  • 120.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Heterogeneous frames and homogenizing activity: Dualistic tensions in a merger discourse2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper conceptualizes a post-merger integration process as a quest for semantic fit in the process of changing meaning in international business; a study of how meaning is constructed in the creation of a new social setting after a merger. The analysis showed how the integra­tion discourse consisted of dualistic tensions in several dimensions, and how management worked towards homogenization to deal with these tensions, which in itself created a tension in the dimension heterogeneity – homogeneity. The paper is based on a longitudinal field study of post-merger integration meetings in a mangement group.

  • 121.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Managers understanding themselves as artifacts: A possibility for identity development during organizational change?2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The merger process is often described as a turbulent situation where cultures collide. For the people involved, this can be a time of crisis, but in this crisis there is also an opportunity for growth. This paper describes how a management group worked in a project to develop a new corporate identity during the integration process after the decision to merge. The first step in this process was to describe the characteristics of the previous cultures using words and images. After this, a shared corporate identity was developed, together with a vision, mission and core values.

     

    The idea of this paper is to discuss a further use of the descriptions of culture made in the identity project. By using the conception of managers in the two organizations, the stereo­types, I will take a look at possible strategies for socially identity-based impression manage­­ment when working in a merged company. To further enhance the interactive aspect of management, I will use the term artefact, instead of stereotype. In the empirical illustration I will show how the management group worked with identity construction after the merger, and what the charac­ter­istics for corporate identity were before and after the merger. Furthermore, I will use the managers’ description of the other and see how this is related to corporate identity (social identity), and how this can be used when thinking about oneself as an artefact. Could managers improve the understanding of their professional identity, when working with a corporate identity? If so, what aspects of corporate identity are used when relating to professions within the company? And can the change of corporate identity be a way to improve management during a post-merger integration process?

  • 122.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Standing at the crossroads: Four ways to the metaphor2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In ethnography there is much focus on fieldwork and the process of writing it down, but less attention have been directed to the techniques of writing it up (Van Maanen, 2006a). In this paper I would like to leave the romantic (?) image of the lonely writer and instead notice the writer as a participant in context. This text is based on the assumption that the best way of working is to engage in presenting and interpreting our social reality based on pluralistic rather than homogeneous ideals. Van Maanen (1995) has been had a leading voice arguing against the homogenization towards an objectivistic approach in social sciences. In the classic book Tales of the Field, Van Maanen (1988) made the reader aware of how reality can be constructed in a variety of ways. The first step was to separate the fieldworker from fieldwork representa¬tions. This means that the researcher moves from being an objective observer of social reality to an active producer of how social reality is represented. The book also gave suggestions on how the writer could make choices in the construction of a text, as well as how the reader could approach a text considering the style. Fine and Martin (1995) demonstrated possibilities of humorous writing in ethnography by displaying how forms like sarcasm, satire and irony was used in Goffman’s texts. Within this style metaphors were used to transform the meaning of what was presented: “Goffman takes the mental hospital and turns it into a university, referring to the “campus” (p. 269) and “campus wheels” (p. 217).” (Fine and Martin, 1995, p. 181-182).

    To this conference I would like to further explore metaphors as a means to build a research text. I will conceptualize four ways to use metaphors: metaphorical creation, metaphorical inspiration, metaphorical reproduction and metaphorical expression. Firstly, metaphorical creation is about highlighting how metaphors appear in theories or how theories are meta¬phors for what they are trying to explain. In this form, the metaphor has gained pseudo-literal status over time. Secondly, metaphorical inspiration is found when the metaphor is consciously used in the creative process to inspire to new insights during the research process. Since one of the basic characteristics of metaphor is that it can change the way we see things, it provides great opportunities to develop ideas and challenge existing beliefs. To talk about metaphorical reproduction is a third way to put focus on how metaphors appear in the empirical setting and how these metaphors can be interpreted and reproduced in a scientific setting. Finally, metaphorical expression, involves the process of writing up research in relation to a reader. Then the metaphor is returned from being a research tool to its original purpose: to be an illustrative device in a text. I end the paper with a summary of the pros and cons of the use of metaphors in social science.

  • 123.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The Circle of Trust: Management in Acquiring and Acquired Family Businesses2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of mergers and acquisitions is of growing concern in many industries dominated by family ownership. Nevertheless there are few empirical studies of mergers and acquisitions involving family firms. While the few studies performed deal with how family owned companies respond to takeovers, this study will focus on family businesses as the acquiring firm. The empirical findings demonstrate that the family ownership logic of a family firm has concrete consequences for the acquisition process. Compared to traditional literature on mergers and acquisition, which has a focus on control by exchanging management in the acquired organization, the acquirers in this study worked in an alternative way when acquiring family owned businesses. The basis for their approach was trust in the acquired managers´ ability to manage the company for the long run.

    Sharma (2004) made a call for further efforts to explore the linkages between family business studies and other disciplines in order to propel the family business field toward establishing a niche and identity within the research community. The aim of this study is to enhance knowledge on mergers and acquisitions in family firms, at the same time as we are using the M&A literature to reflect on the specifics of the family firm. The purpose of this study is to explore management of acquired family businesses, with special attention to family ownership logic. Suggestions for further research both regarding mergers and acquisitions within the family business field and the theoretical construct family ownership logic will be discussed.

  • 124.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Florin Samuelsson, Emilia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The Circle of Trust: The Logic and Praxis of Acquisitions in the Family Owned Business2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family business women in media discourse: the business role and the mother role2011In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 154-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Writings in the media have the potential to influence our standpoint and, thereby, our actions. In this paper, the authors analyze how women in family business are represented in media to understand the frames set by this discourse in terms of women owning and leading family businesses. The aim of the paper is to explore how the counterposed roles of business person and mother are presented in media and what implications this might have for role enactment. Design/methodology/approach - The paper opted for an exploratory study of 308 articles about women in family business over a 15-year period. In the interpretative, qualitative analysis of media texts, the discursive construction of the mother role and the business role are explored. Findings - The paper provides empirical insights into how the mother role is taken for granted while the business role is approached as problematic in portrayals of women in family business. The authors discuss whether the media discourse reinforces traditional roles or stimulates role innovation. Practical implications - Understanding role as something separate from the individual provides a means to critically review expectations of women in business and how these expectations hinder business activities. Originality/value - The study examines data over a 15-year period in the Swedish media setting and describes changes in attitudes about women's roles in family business. Regarding the family business as an arena for performative acts provides a perspective that can highlight the intertwinement of the private and professional arenas in family business.

  • 126.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Bäckvall, Lisa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Family business women in the media discourse: The fairytale heiresses and the down-to-earth tomboys2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An alternative way to study a phenomenon is to explore texts in order to learn about discursive constructions within specific areas on a societal level. One example of such as study is Ahl (2002) who examined how the female entrepreneur was constructed in research texts. She found that even though the texts celebrated women’s entrepreneur­ship, they also recreated women’s secondary position in society. In this paper, the area of study is notions of women in family business and we have examined how Swedish media (re)constructs meanings about women in family business. The empirical material in this study is media texts about women in family businesses over a ten year period (1999-2008). This text departs from the general definition of discourse as ‘a particular way of talking about and under­standing the world (or an aspect of the world) ’ (Phillips and Jørgensen, 2006, p. 1). One contradiction found in the media discourse was the difference between the famous heiresses and the everyday woman working hands-on, often in manufacturing industries. Concerning the heiresses, they were sometimes mentioned in the same article as family business women in other countries, thus adding an international flair to the description. The entrepreneurs were instead noted for excelling in business and prizes/positions received as an outcome of their performance. Different ways to portray business women could have implica­tions for other women facing a situation of becoming a family business owner/manager since role modeling can be an important inspiration for choices made by individuals.

  • 127.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Larsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Bridging Types and Frames in the Organizational (Inter)Act: Type Casting of Female Researchers in Academia2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we bridge the concepts type (Schutz) and frame (Goffman) to conceptualize misfits in the social intercourse of the academic everyday experiences. We see the combination of type and frame as a way to further elaborate the role concept. This was done by developing an interactional model that illustrates a combination of type and frame in relation to an organizational setting where the (inter)act takes place. The concept (inter)act is used to stress that although people may participate in the same act; this is not necessarily the same thing as role agreement during interaction. Rather, the lack of agreement is the starting point for this paper; we work with the empirical question “Why were we, and our fellow colleagues, treated as women when we were acting as researchers?”

    The problem we address is how some people in an academic organization confused the idea of woman as a type with the female body, and what consequences this had for everyday social practices. This paper is based on an at-home ethnography (Alvesson, forthcoming), which in our version include both introspection and dialogue around emerging ideas and involves a strong component of re-interpretation.  We suggest that individuals may embrace or reject role-types, connected to a role-frame of expected behavior, in the organizational socialization process. Research as an activity is characterized by both masculine and feminine attributes, but in line with previous writings we see the research organization as gendered; the researcher-type is a man. We have called this type-role the wizard-man, a type that engage in intellectual activity. An alternative type-role is the mother-woman, whose role-frame is in line with key words such as body and caring. In the academic organization studied, there was a blurring between people as abstract (ideal) types and as individuals. In the organizational context, gendering by type casting seemed to be an important aspect of the socialization process. A negative consequence came when doctoral students were equaled to the mother-woman role, since these doctoral students were assumed to take on a role that was not in line with their professional development.

  • 128.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Larsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The yin and yang of organization: Applying Jung's terminology to take a closer look at management of shadows2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In management and organization research the positive, upward-seeking, producing side (yang) is often described as some kind of best practice that we can get inspired by but as an individual within an organization you also encounter another side that is passive, dark and negative (yin).

    “The yang face of managing, the drama of MSF and the corresponding style of its leader, would seem more representative of how management is practiced today. [ ] The drama, not the daily routine, is what attracts and sells. But most managing is about the daily routine—about trying to establish and sustain excellence. In that respect, we need to pay more attention to the mysteries of yin. If there really are two faces of managing, then we have been neglecting one of them.” (Mintzberg 2001, page 312)

    In this working paper we would like to explore the yin and yang of organization using Jung’s terminology as a metaphor for different aspects of organization. In a modern world where the yang is related to constructs of masculinity and the yin to constructs of femininity, how can Jungs terminology of the subconscious inhabited by shadows and Anima be included in a notion of management – as managing shadows of the organisations? In 1943 Jung e.g. wrote:

    “As a consequence of his identification with the collective psyche he will try to force the demands of his subconscious onto others, because the identification with the collective psyche is followed by a sense of universality (godlikeness) which totally ignores all differences in the personal psyches of fellowmen.” (Jung 1967:42)

    Can the dualism in either yang or yin be rephrased as the collective projection of both yang and of yin on others, creating positive yang at the expense of the negative yin? Is positive yang only the rejection of yin and in that case where does yin go? Of particular interest is a situation where the divide between conscious/subconscious is exceptionally large or grandiose fronts take over the managerial role. What would happen if these collective projections are challenged? What kind of implications can this have for the organization and the people within them? What would it take for yang and yin to meet – possibly in consciousness? Empirical examples in the text are based on a field study of a merger together with the authors’ experience of working in an academic organization.

    Mintzberg, H. (2001): The Yin and the Yang of Managing, Organizational Dynamics, 29(4): 306-312.

    Jung, C. G. (1967): Jaget och det omedvetna (The self and the subconscious), Wahlström & Widstrand, Stockholm.

  • 129.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Merging Two Family Businesses by Creating a New Ownership Logic2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    After the merger between two family owned companies, it soon became apparent that the managers had to deal with different family ownership logics (FOL). One reason for this was that the old FOLs were connected to different business models, which created problems for integration based on way of working.

    Mickelson and Worley (2003) made a call for additional research on family businesses involved in international mergers and acquisitions. This study contributes to the under¬standing of the unique features of the family system at work during the integration process in combination with different ways of working depending on family ownership logic.

  • 130.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Unwinding organizational culture: A study of a post-merger integration process between two family businesses2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the scarce volume of studies of mergers involving family businesses. In the merger described, managers used the culture concept to name problematic aspects of the integration process. In the analysis, we have used the three-circle model to understand the contradictions that emerged in the managers description of organizational culture. To consider the subsystems in the three-circle model: ownership, business and family, means a broadening of the idea that the founder (family) shapes the organizational culture. This could be especially relevant for larger and/or growing family businesses.

  • 131.
    Björkqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Johannesson, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Jorikson, Linn
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Companies on Facebook: How many of the 100  largest Swedish Companies have a Facebook page, and how do they use it?2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    The purpose of  this thesis is to see if the 100 largest Swedish companies are present on  Facebook, and if they are, how they use their business pages. Further the  customers’ perception of companies’ use of Facebook will be included. To  investigate this, three research questions were created.

    Background:

    As Web 2.0 and  its application has changed, the use of Internet, both for companies and  customers, there has been change in how information is delivered and how  people take in information. One application of Web 2.0 is Facebook, and in  this investigation the authors will look at the use of the application in  companies marketing strategy.  Many researchers  and marketers (Constantinides & Fountain, 2008; Carlsson, 2009; Yang et  al., 2009) recognizes the importance for companies to take advantage of this  new media and sees a value generating process for both company and customer,  but how this value generates profits is harder to identify. Further the  market and possibility to reach customers is every day increasing as Facebook  has gone from 100 million in 2008 to approximately 600 million members in 2011. Today in  Sweden, over four million people have a Facebook account. 

    Method:

    To gather empirical data the use of a coding sheet  has been developed through content analysis when investigating the selected  companies’ business pages. The companies were found from a list over the 100  largest Swedish companies ranked after turnover. Further to collect the customers’  perception of companies on Facebook a focus group were conducted. In the  focus group a semi-structured interview approach was chosen to create an open  discussion within the group but still maintaining on the subject in hand. To  analyze the empirical findings theories about social media, customer loyalty  and communication were used. 

    Conclusion:

    The authors of this thesis have determined three  different appearance areas by companies on Facebook; support forum,  advertising channel and just exist on the social media. Two main ways for  companies to use Facebook is as a customer support page or as an advertising/promotion/publicity  channel. In customers support pages the communication between the company and  customer is more substantial and different types of communication are to be  found such as B2C, C2B and C2C. By using  Facebook as advertising /promotion /publicity page the companies communicate  more through pictures and videos that is pushed out  by the company. The customers interact through viewing and commenting the  uploaded material.

    The result from the focus group  showed that the customer appreciated the advertising/promotion/publicity page  as this corresponds with their perception of companies on Facebook. The  participant saw the customer support page on Facebook as unserious and not a  suitable way of communicating with a company.  

  • 132.
    Björnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Börjesson, Ann
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The Ownership Effect on Motivation: A comparison between public and independent schools in Jönköping2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Problem: One of the questions of debate before to the election of the Swedish parliament in 2006 was whether independent schools should be prioritized or not. The right wing of the Swedish parliament was more positive to the topic than the left wing. This subject has many aspects, one of them considers motivation; motivation both among students and teachers. This thesis is focusing on the latter and the research questions treated are: “How does the ownership affect the motivation of the employees within the organization?” and “Are the employees in a private organisation more motivated than the employees of a public organisation?”

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to show which factors that affect the motivation among the teachers within two types of schools; independent and publicly owned. Moreover the aim is to recognize whether there are any differences in motivation among the teachers within these types of schools.

    Frame of reference: The empirical part of the thesis is built on different theories concerning motivation. Amongst others are theories concerning extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, fairness and the meaning of goals treated.

    Empirical Findings: The result shows no clear difference between all motivation variables measured when the two types of schools was compared. The teachers in the public schools were according to the theories more motivated when it came to goal setting; they participated more when the goals was set and the goals was anticipated more clearly than in the independent schools. These teachers did also feel that their salaries were set according to the result of their work to a greater extent. The teachers in the independent schools did on the other hand feel that the communication with the closest manager work better, that they reach the preset goals and they value interesting work tasks to a greater extent. The other tested variables showed no significant difference between the means.

    Analysis and Conclusion: The goal setting process seems to work better within the public schools in general compared to the independent schools, which might be explained by the relative ages of the schools. The other side of the coin when it comes to clear goals could be that the way of doing things in the public school has been the same for a long time. This might explain why more teachers within independent schools found exciting working tasks important when choosing place of work. The aggregated result of this study did not show that the teachers in independent schools are more motivated than those in public schools; the study does therefore not support the arguments from the right wing of the parliament.

  • 133.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brand meaning and impact in subcontractor contexts2009In: Business-to-business brand management: theory, research and executive case study exercises / [ed] Mark S. Glynn, Arch G. Woodside, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2009, p. 223-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brand management in industrial markets is an important subject. The relative youth of this interest implies gaps in the understanding of the phenomenon, though. With regards to the emphasis on brands in today’s competitive markets, improving the understanding of brand meaning and impact in diverse industrial situations and organizations is valuable to both management and theory. This paper adds to the expansion of such insights by applying the notion of brands to subcontractors; their market offer and situation. An overview of the brand concept and brand research in industrial markets directs the discussion. The chapter reports on a qualitative study with the aim to support better comprehension of the meaning and impact of brands in a subcontractor context. The study focuses on buyers’ decision making processes. Customers, although they ultimately focus on product price and quality, rely on corporate brand image for making decisions at several stages of purchasing. Buyers normally face a situation where they must choose among a number of potential suppliers, where they perceive uncertainty and limits regarding time and information. In the process of finding and selecting suitable suppliers, subcontractor corporate brands therefore revolve around proxies for expertise and reliability. A focus on subcontractor brand management can render benefits to individual suppliers concerning the amount of potential clients and signed contracts. Also, paying more attention to corporate brand meaning and content can improve the efficiency of matching buyers with supplier.

  • 134.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Branding released as a general marketing issue.2003In: The 17th Nordic Conference on Business Studies, Reykjavik., 2003Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 135.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family business: a secondary brand in corporate brand management2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do firms allude to family involvement in their marketing efforts? How can such references influence marketing outcomes? In view of these questions, the current paper argues that the business format “family business” holds a brand of its own; a brand that can offer distinctiveness to brands on corporate as well as product level. Revisiting theory on secondary brand associations and image transfer, the paper interprets the function of references to family in corporate communications and clarifies their relationship to corporate branding. Potential difficulties involved in the referral to family business are identified. Propositions for further research are proposed.

  • 136.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Generation X – killar, tjejer och androgyna varumärken2001In: Brandnews, Vol. 12, no 12Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 137.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Growth and risk taking behaviour in SMEs2000Report (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Networking, a juicy fruit for Internet and IT brands – How Strategic Networking can Build Balloon Brands.2002In: Networks and Business Renewal, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping , 2002, p. 147-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Reputation and image a key for sales? Discussing corporate branding in the subcontractor market.2004In: The 13th International Annual IPSERA Conference, Catania,: (International Purchasing and Supply Education and Research Association), 2004Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 140.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Supplier brand image - a catalyst for choice: Expanding the B2B brand discourse by studying the role corporate brand image plays in the selection of subcontractors2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis discusses brands and branding in a B2B context by investigating the role corporate brand image plays during the selection of subcontractors and, furthermore, how subcontractors might pursue branding as an active communication strategy. The background for these questions can be found in the evolving topics of corporate communications and B2B branding.

    The empirical parts focus on how buyers and sellers representing nine companies in the subcontractor context describe different phases and processes included in sales and purchasing.

    The results indicate that subcontractor corporate brand image can play different roles depending on the buyers’ situation. The type of product and buy class, in addition to the availability of time, known subcontractors and information sources, prove to have an impact on buyer behaviour and, consequently, the role played by corporate brand image. The analysis of subcontractor branding reveals that, although the brand concept is not in focus, branding activities can be identified. However, it also indicates that the reality of subcontractor branding is not in compliance with the theory on corporate branding and communications, which might be criticised for giving a too straightforward approach to the introduction of integrated and corporate-wide communications management.

  • 141.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The family business concept as an element in corporate branding.2006In: 2nd workshop on Family Firm Management Research, Nice, France, June 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 142.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    The impact of relationships and networks on industrial buying behavior - a tentative model.2006In: 22nd Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group Conference, Milan, Italy, September 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 143.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The recognition and neglect of reputation: a study of Swedish subcontractors2009In: Marketing and Entrepreneurship: Proceedings of AUMEC 2009 / [ed] Kocak, A., Ambibola, T., Özer, A. and Watkins-Mathys, L., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Anderson, Helén
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Product Development on the House: A  Small Subcontractor and Its Customer Interaction2009In: Marketing and Entrepreneurship: Proceedings of AUMEC 2009 / [ed] Kocak, A., Ambibola, T., Özer, A., and Watkins-Mathys, L., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Handler revisited - mission completed?: An updated review of family business definitions in research publications and among practitioners2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The family business definition among researchers, practitioners and policy makers: Differences, similarities and implications2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Corporate identity manifested through historical references2009In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 404-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on how firms draw on historical references in corporate marketing. The paper seeks to analyze the logic behind such efforts from a corporate identity perspective and to propose potential risks and/or benefits of doing so. The paper aims to inspire the understanding of how references to history are used in marketing and the outcome of such use.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper mainly draws on literature relating to corporate marketing and the use of history in organizations. Combining these theories, and pointing at empirical examples, the paper clarifies why references to history can be important mani-festations of corporate identity. The paper comes up with propositions concerning what consequences the reference to history in corporate marketing can have for firms’ marketing strategies and business development.

    Findings – The paper outlines a connection among corporate identity, organizational identity, and image through corporate communications. It suggests that among the range of corporate characteristics, historical references can be particular valuable for corporate communications thanks to the reliability age can provide (as opposed to liabilities of newness). Still, elaborations suggest that the planned use of historical references has both pros and cons in terms of business development.

    Originality/value – Despite the notion that history, as an inevitable and distinctive firm feature, can play an important role in corporate marketing, research on the topic is quite scarce. This paper offers some remedy to this gap by elaborating on the internal and external rationales for applying historical references and how these can be explained in connections between corporate identity and history.

  • 148.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Corporate identity of family firms: How family businesses refer to family and company history in their marketing efforts2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    EGADE Zona Centro at Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Family as part of the corporate brand: spotting the ambiguous, emergent and strategic forms of identity creation2009In: Global Perspectives on Family Business Developments: Theory, Practice, Policy / [ed] Putziouris, P. & Hadjielias, E., Nicosia, Cyprus: International Family Enterprise Research Academy , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Wigren, Caroline
    Lund University.
    Are not multinationals also community actors?: Challenging the notion of small versus large firm corporate social responsibility2008In: CRRC 2008 Conference Proceedings: The corporate responsibility research conference 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 101 - 150 of 1145
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