Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 19828
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101. Aberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hepworth, Mike
    O'Reilly, Karen
    Lithell, Hans
    On loss of activity and independence, adaptation improves life satisfaction in old age: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions.2005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1111-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Abghari, Shahrooz
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Boeva, Veselka
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Lavesson, Niklas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL). Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Grahn, Håkan
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Gustafsson, Jörgen
    Ericsson AB.
    Shaikh, Junaid
    Ericsson AB.
    Outlier Detection for Video Session Data Using Sequential Pattern Mining2018In: ACM SIGKDD Workshop On Outlier Detection De-constructed, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of Internet video and over-the-top transmission techniqueshas enabled online video service providers to deliver highquality video content to viewers. To maintain and improve thequality of experience, video providers need to detect unexpectedissues that can highly affect the viewers’ experience. This requiresanalyzing massive amounts of video session data in order to findunexpected sequences of events. In this paper we combine sequentialpattern mining and clustering to discover such event sequences.The proposed approach applies sequential pattern mining to findfrequent patterns by considering contextual and collective outliers.In order to distinguish between the normal and abnormal behaviorof the system, we initially identify the most frequent patterns. Thena clustering algorithm is applied on the most frequent patterns.The generated clustering model together with Silhouette Index areused for further analysis of less frequent patterns and detectionof potential outliers. Our results show that the proposed approachcan detect outliers at the system level.

  • 103.
    Abghari, Shahrooz
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Boeva, Veselka
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Lavesson, Niklas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL). Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Grahn, Håkan
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Ickin, Selim
    Ericsson, SWE.
    Gustafsson, Jörgen
    Ericsson, SWE.
    A Minimum Spanning Tree Clustering Approach for Outlier Detection in Event Sequences2018In: The 17th IEEE International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications Special Session on Machine Learning Algorithms, Systems and Applications, IEEE, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outlier detection has been studied in many domains. Outliers arise due to different reasons such as mechanical issues, fraudulent behavior, and human error. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised approach for outlier detection in a sequence dataset. The proposed approach combines sequential pattern mining, cluster analysis, and a minimum spanning tree algorithm in order to identify clusters of outliers. Initially, the sequential pattern mining is used to extract frequent sequential patterns. Next, the extracted patterns are clustered into groups of similar patterns. Finally, the minimum spanning tree algorithm is used to find groups of outliers. The proposed approach has been evaluated on two different real datasets, i.e., smart meter data and video session data. The obtained results have shown that our approach can be applied to narrow down the space of events to a set of potential outliers and facilitate domain experts in further analysis and identification of system level issues.

  • 104.
    Abghari, Shahrooz
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    García Martín, Eva
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Johansson, Christian
    NODA Intelligent Systems AB, Sweden.
    Lavesson, Niklas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL). Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Grahn, Håkan
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Institutionen för datalogi och datorsystemteknik.
    Trend analysis to automatically identify heat program changes2017In: Energy Procedia, Elsevier, 2017, p. 407-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to improve the monitoring and controlling of heating systems located at customer buildings through the use of a decision support system. To achieve this, the proposed system applies a two-step classifier to detect manual changes of the temperature of the heating system. We apply data from the Swedish company NODA, active in energy optimization and services for energy efficiency, to train and test the suggested system. The decision support system is evaluated through an experiment and the results are validated by experts at NODA. The results show that the decision support system can detect changes within three days after their occurrence and only by considering daily average measurements.

  • 105.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    #Familygoals: Family influencers, calibrated amateurism, and justifying young digital labor2017In: Social Media and Society, ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following in the celebrity trajectory of mommy bloggers, global micro-microcelebrities, and reality TV families, family Influencers on social media are one genre of microcelebrity for whom the “anchor” content in which they demonstrate their creative talents, such as producing musical covers or comedy sketches, is a highly profitable endeavor. Yet, this commerce is sustained by an undercurrent of “filler” content wherein everyday routines of domestic life are shared with followers as a form of “calibrated amateurism.” Calibrated amateurism is a practice and aesthetic in which actors in an attention economy labor specifically over crafting contrived authenticity that portrays the raw aesthetic of an amateur, whether or not they really are amateurs by status or practice, by relying on the performance ecology of appropriate platforms, affordances, tools, cultural vernacular, and social capital. In this article, I consider the anatomy of calibrated amateurism, and how this practice relates to follower engagement and responses. While some follower responses have highlighted concerns over the children’s well-being, a vast majority overtly signal their love, support, and even envy toward such parenting. I draw on ethnographically informed content analysis of two group of family Influencers on social media to illustrate the enactment and value of calibrated amateurism in an increasingly saturated ecology and, investigate how such parents justify the digital labor in which their children partake to produce viable narratives of domestic life.

  • 106.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    ‘Just Asian’?: inscribing east Asian ‘mixed race’ in Australia2017In: Mixed Race Identities in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands / [ed] Kirsten McGavin, Farida Fozdar, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 84-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia.
    The Semiotics of Emoji: The Rise of Visual Language in the Age of the Internet2018In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 450-453Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Queenstown, Singapore.
    Vote for my selfie: Politician selfies as charismatic engagement2017In: Selfie Citizenship / [ed] Adi Kuntsman, Springer, 2017, p. 75-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking Singaporean Member of Parliament (MP) Baey Yam Keng as a case study, this chapter analyses how charismatic engagement can be mediated through social media and selfie tropes. In the wake of online campaigns since the General Elections 2011, and with the ruling party garnering its lowest share of electoral votes since state independence, MP Baey, aged 47, has emerged as a press-branded 'selfie king', 'social media celebrity' and 'Twitter influencer' for engaging with the online citizenry since publishing his first selfie in March 2013. Drawing on his Instagram and Twitter feed and selfie-related engagements up till 2015, this chapter demonstrates how politician selfies can be exercised to solicit affect and mobilise public sentiment among voters.

  • 109.
    Abidin, Crystal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Young people and digital grief etiquette2019In: A Networked Self and Birth, Life, Death / [ed] Zizi Papacharissi, Routledge, 2019, p. 160-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Centre for Culture and Technology (CCAT), Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cover, Rob
    The University of Western Australia.
    Gay, famous and working hard on YouTube: Influencers, queer microcelebrity publics and discursive activism2019In: Youth, sexuality and sexual citizenship / [ed] P. Aggleton, R. Cover, D. Leahy, D. Marshall, & M. L. Rasmussen, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2019, p. 217-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ordinary digital media users who gained large public followings, also known as Influencers, emerged as micro-celebrities in the early 2000s, with many working for a living directly through online content creation and the self-representation of their everyday lives. Capitalising on high visibility, many Influencers also engage in social justice activities. As a result, they have become important nodes in LGBTQ networks online, including through personal and organisational collaborations. In this chapter, we draw on digital ethnography to analyse a gay-identifying Australian YouTube Influencer, Troye Sivan, focussing on how his status as an Influencer creating digital content has fostered queer support by way of a creative work orientation that simultaneously promotes both a rights-based activism and his own career.

  • 111.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). National University of Singapore, Queenstown, Singapore.
    Gwynne, Joel
    National Institute of Education, Singapore.
    Entrepreneurial selves, feminine corporeality and lifestyle blogging in Singapore2017In: Asian Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1568-4849, E-ISSN 2212-3857, Vol. 45, no 4-5, p. 385-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The making of the entrepreneurial self is a dominant trope of contemporary media culture, and a multitude of media formats across divergent national contexts showcase the contemporary obsession with media visibility and the attainment of celebrity status as the most aspirational form of social mobility. In Singapore, commercial lifestyle blogs are prime examples of entrepreneurial identity-making as websites almost exclusively created by young women, showcasing user-generated content oriented around the pleasures of consumption as a means of empowerment, self-actualisation and individualisation. By analysing content on a selection of blogs, this article aims to answer the following questions: To what extent are Singaporean women’s identities contingent upon material consumption as a means of identity creation? How do blogs created by women demonstrate an entrepreneurial investment in their appearance and feminine corporeality as the means of perceived empowerment, even at the expense of more formal and structured forms of individualisation, such as education?

  • 112.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Consumer-led innovation in social media advertising formats2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and weblogs, consumer activity is increasingly institutionalized, guarded by rules and norms. Consumers take on tasks previously performed by trained media workers, but they also create new activities, emerging as a new breed of media workers, institutionalizing new fields of the media and advertising industries and their associated practices (Dolbec and Fischer 2015). It has been described how amateur workers develop new ethical norms and rules for publishing, by taking journalistic/editorial decisions on what content to publish and how, within their new institutional domain (Abidin & Ots, 2015).

     

    This paper is focused on a specific group of stakeholders – everyday Internet users who manufacture themselves into a new form of social media microcelebrity known as the ‘Influencer’ (Abidin 2015). Since 2005, many young women have taken to social media to craft ‘microcelebrity personas’ as a career – “a new style of online performance that involves people ‘amping up’ their popularity over the Web using technologies like video, blogs and social networking sites” (Senft 2008: 25). In their most basic capacity, Influencers produce advertorials on blogs and social media platforms in exchange for payment or sponsored products and services (Abidin 2015). Owing to their power to shape purchase decisions, their clients have progressed from small home businesses to bluechip companies including Canon, Gucci, and KLM. Until recently, the most effective advertorials are those that are seamlessly woven into the daily narratives Influencers publish on their blogs and social media, such that readers are unable to tell apart ‘paid opinions’ from ‘unpaid’ sentiments (Abidin 2014). However, along with the maturity of the field, there is a gradual standardization of new advertising formats.

     

    The conducted study explores how semi-professional microcelebrity Influencers create advertising market innovations. Researchers have previously described how consumer fans help firms innovate (e.g. Füller et al 2008), and how fan cultures celebrate their favourite brands by creating their own advertisements (Muniz & Schau 2005; for overview see Ots & Hartmann 2015). This paper takes a slightly different approach – rather than seeing consumers as co-creators, it demonstrates how new actors outside the traditional media and advertising industries, make innovations that compete with the incumbents. We focus on these vernacular advertising innovations in the age of social media, and seek to understand how Influencers orientate towards a youth market in the saturated, visually dominated attention economy of Instagram. The findings include a typology of innovative advertising formats emerging outside the traditional media companies, along with their associated publishing rules as defined by the semi-professional Influencers.

     

    The data draws on a larger study of social media Influencers in Singapore since mid-2010, including over a year of intensive participant observation conducted with these Influencers in the flesh in the capacity of various roles. These interactions and observations were archived in extensively detailed field diaries. 120 personal interviews were conducted with Influencers, Influencer management agencies, (prospective) clients, readers, and friends and family of Influencers between December 2011 and July 2013. Social media content from blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, AskFM, and popular public forums was archived until December 2015. Fieldwork entailed continued interaction with other actors involved in the Influencers’ social milieu, including their peers, backend production management, sponsors and advertisers, and readers. As such, although the data is drawn mainly from the textual and visual content of publically accessed blogs and associated social media platforms including Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, the analysis is highly contextualised and shaped by long-term ethnographic work among these Influencers. 

  • 113.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Influencers Tell All?: Unravelling Authenticity and Credibility in a Brand Scandal2016In: Blurring the lines: Market-driven and democracy-driven freedom of expression / [ed] Maria Edström, Andrew T. Kenyon & Eva-Maria Svensson, Nordicom, 2016, p. 153-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the emerging practices of social media Influencers. In focus are six influential Instagram Influencers who were ‘exposed’ for involving themselves in campaigns aiming to discredit telecommunications providers in Singapore. In the absence of enforced legal boundaries and industry norms regarding advertising formats and advertising ethics, brand scandals are frequent, causing concern among regulators, brand managers, and platform owners. When starting to accommodate commercial brands and contents in social media posts, Influencers are constantly at risk of breaching their contract of trust with their followers. The case study shows how Influencers, followers, and eventually also the brand clients, are sensitive to what they experience as deceptive and unethical behaviours that will put normative pressures onto the Influencers to conform to certain ethical standards.

  • 114.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Microcelebrity influencers and advertorial disclosure: Practicing the advertising/editorial divide on Instagram2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Abidin, Crystal
    et al.
    University of Western Australia.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Influencer’s dilemma: The shaping of new brand professions between credibility and commerce2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new "liquid" media environment involves a range of new professions, practices and practitioners (Deuze 2011). Based on a rich ethnographic study containing personal interviews and participant observation, this paper looks at semi-professional Influencers in the social media marketing industry and asks how these new branding professions and their practices emerge and institutionalize. Specifically, the material draws on data collected between 2011 and 2015 among women Influencers in the ‘lifestyle’ genre in Singapore who advertise products and services in the industry verticals of Fashion, Beauty, and Electronic goods on blogs, Twitter, and Instagram.

  • 116.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Main Support Mechanisms to Finance Renewable Energy Development2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. Additionally, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and creation of green jobs. There are three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a marketview policy is applied by the government.

  • 117.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    College of Engineering, TEMEP, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The main support mechanisms to finance renewable energy development2014In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 40, p. 876-885Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. In addition, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and the creation of green jobs. This study compares three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a market view policy is applied by the government. Finally, considering technological progress and the cost reduction for power generation by renewable energy sources, we suggest that support mechanism policies should be reconsidered from the financial point of view. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 118.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Sogang University.
    Altmann, Jorn
    International University of Bruchsal.
    The Effect of Renewable Energy Development on Carbon Emission Reduction: An Empirical Analysis for the EU-15 Countries2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased concerns about climate change have made renewable energy sources an important topic of research. Several scholars have applied different methodologies to examine the relationships between energy consumption and economic growth of individual and groups of countries and to analyze the environmental effects of energy policies. Previous studies have analyzed carbon emission savings, using renewable energy usage as an individual source or in combination with traditional sources of energy (e.g., hybrid plants) in connection with lifecycle analysis methods. It is shown that after a certain period, economic growth leads to the promotion of environmental quality. However, econometric modelling critiques have opposed the results of these studies. One reason is that the effectiveness of governance-related parameters has previously been neglected. In this research, we analyze the impact of renewable energy development on carbon emission reduction. We estimate a model to evaluate the effectiveness of renewable energy development, technological innovation, and market regulations in carbon emission reduction. The empirical results are based on a panel data estimation using the EU-15 countries data observed from 1995 to 2010. The elasticities of CO2 emissions are estimated, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of each parameter. The findings show that the effects of a negative climate change could be mitigated by governance-related parameters instead of economic development.

  • 119.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Altmann, Jörn
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    A Review of Renewable Energy Supply and Energy Efficiency Technologies2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption will comprise an increasing share of global energy demand during the next two decades. In recent years, the increasing prices of fossil fuels and concerns about the environmental consequences of greenhouse gas emissions have renewed the interest in the development of alternative energy resources. In particular, the Fukushima Daiichi accident was a turning point in the call for alternative energy sources. Renewable energy is now considered a more desirable source of fuel than nuclear power due to the absence of risk and disasters. Considering that the major component of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern about reducing carbon emissions. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reducing carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovations. Two main solutions may be implemented to reduce CO2 emissions and overcome the problem of climate change: replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources as much as possible and enhancing energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss alternative technologies for enhancing renewable energy deployment and energy use efficiency.

  • 120.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    Petr Univ Technol, Natl Iranian Oil Co, Int Affairs, Tehran, Iran.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Sogang Univ, Seoul, South Korea.
    Rashidghalam, Masoomeh
    Univ Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran.
    Energy security and competition over energy resources in Iran and Caucasus region2017In: AIMS Energy, ISSN 2333-8326, E-ISSN 2333-8334, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 224-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy security as a dominant factor in international stability is of great importance for major economies. The global energy market with its current level of supply and demand relies on energy sources in the Middle East, Caucasus, Central Asia and Russia. After the Fukushima disaster nuclear powers in Europe view renewable energy sources as a serious alternative. Europe’s energy vulnerability has deteriorated due to the Russia-Ukraine conflict. However, renewable energy sources are not large enough to replace nuclear power completely. This trend will continue with climbing demand especially in the natural gas sector as clean energy. In this research, Caucasus and Iran are considered the main sources and routes for energy transmission to the global market, including Europe. Caucasus plays a key role in bridging Europe and Asia. Also, Iran is an alternative for energy transmission to Europe after lifted sanctions. As part of the European active supply diversification policy Iran has capacity to reduce Europe’s energy dependency on Russia. However, changes in US new administration America First Policy is harmful for the EUs energy security. Caucasus aims to catch a large share of the European energy market since the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline has started operations and Iran is also trying to expand its market to become a sustainable source of energy for major consumers. Therefore, Iran and Caucasus are considered reliable energy suppliers for Europe. In this regard, we analyze the best motivation for changing the direction new suppliers’ energy policies towards Europe and suggest alternative solutions to compete with rival countries in order to enhance energy security.

  • 121.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. University College of Kristianstad,Kristianstad.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, p. -20633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sa´pmi (Lapland), reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC), an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health.

    Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613) in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525) in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders.

    Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders.

    Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community

  • 122.
    Abrahamsson, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mathematics.
    Strong L1 convergence to equilibrium without entropy conditions for the Boltzmann equation1999In: Communications in Partial Differential Equations, ISSN 0360-5302, E-ISSN 1532-4133, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 1501-1535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main result of this paper is that for the har dsphere kernel, the solution of the spatially homogenous Boltzmann equation converges strongly in L1 to equilibrium given that the initial data f0 belongs to L1(R3,(1+v^2)dv). This was previously known to be true with the additional assumption that f0logf0 belonged to L1(R3), which corresponds to bounded initial entropy.

  • 123.
    Abrahamsson, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mathematics.
    Strong L1 convergence to equilibrium without entropy conditions for the spatially homogenous Boltzmann equation1997Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with solutions to the Cauchy problem for the spatially homogeneous non-linear Boltzmann equation. The main result is that for the hard sphere kernel, a solution to the Boltzmann equation converges strongly in L1 to equilibrium given that the initial data f0 belongs to L1(R^3;(1+v^2)dv). This was previously known to be true with the additional assumption that f0logf0 belonged to L1(R^3). For the proof of the main theorem, new regularising effects for the gain term in the collision operator are derived, and previous results concerning uniform bounds on the time it takes for a solution to the Boltzmann equation to reach equilibrium are extended.

  • 124. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, S G
    Phobic avoidance and regular dental care in fearful dental patients: a comparative study.2001In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Stenman, J
    Ohrn, K
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Attitudes to dental hygienists: evaluation of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey in a Swedish population of patients and students.2007In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to evaluate and test the psychometric properties of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey (DHBS) in a Swedish sample of different patient groups and students. It was hypothesized that negative dental hygienist beliefs would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS was distributed together with the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) and the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The study sample included 394 subjects (130 students, 144 general dental patients, 90 periodontal patients and 30 patients on a waiting list for dental fear treatment). The results verified that the DHBS discriminates well between dentally fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96-0.98) in all the groups. The correlation between the DHBS and the DBS-R was high (rho = 0.82, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the DHBS correlated significantly with the DAS, as well as with a low but significant correlation to age (more negative attitudes in younger age groups) and gender (more negative attitudes amongst women). Regression analysis showed that gender and the DHBS items: 23, 16 and 28, i.e. items related to feeling helpless, worries/fears not being taken seriously and fear about 'bad news' possibly preventing treatment, were the most important predictors of dental fear. The results suggest that the DHBS may be a valid and reliable scale to use in order to assess patient's specific attitudes to dental hygienists. However, the psychometric properties including test-retest analysis and the underlying factor structure of the DHBS need to be further explored.

  • 126. Abrahamsson, Kajsa H
    et al.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Stenman, Jane
    Ohrn, Kerstin
    Dental beliefs: evaluation of the Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey in different patient groups and in a non-clinical student sample.2006In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to test the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) in different patient groups and in a non-clinical sample of students. It was hypothesized that negative dental beliefs, assessed using the DBS-R, would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The questionnaire was distributed together with the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The sample included 550 adults who responded to the questionnaires (206 students, 177 general dental patients, 105 periodontal patients and 62 patients at a waiting list for dental-fear treatment). The internal drop-out rate was low. The results confirmed that the DBS-R discriminates well between fearful patients and the other study groups. The DBS-R had a high internal consistency in all the study groups. Furthermore, the DBS-R correlated significantly with age (higher values in younger age groups) and the DAS. Regression analyses showed that the DBS-R subdimensions of 'communication' and 'control'/or 'trust', respectively, were significant predictors for dental fear. The results suggest that the DBS-R is a reliable and valid instrument for use in different Swedish patient- and non-clinical population groups in order to assess attitudes to dentists. However, the underlying factor structure of the DBS-R needs to be further explored and established.

  • 127. Abrahamsson, Kajsa Henning
    et al.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, Sven G
    The importance of dental beliefs for the outcome of dental-fear treatment.2003In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Lunds universitet.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Svenska handelshögskolan i Helsingfors.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Rehn, Alf
    Åbo Akademi.
    Segerstedt, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Öhman, Peter
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Industriell ekonomi och organisering2016Book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS).
    Business models for telemedicine services: A literature review2015In: Health Systems, ISSN 2047-6965, E-ISSN 2047-6973, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 189-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telemedicine has been acknowledged to improve the quality of healthcare. However, many telemedicine services fail beyond the pilot phase. A literature review on business model components for telemedicine services was conducted. Based on specified inclusion criteria, 22 publications were included in the review. To facilitate the analysis of literature, a business model framework with value as its central focus was proposed. Improvement in quality, efficiency and accessibility of care were identified to be the outcomes of telemedicine, with patients and healthcare personnel being the main users of the services, which are delivered through home, institutional and community-based care. Patients, health providers, vendors, payers and government agencies are actors involved in the delivery of telemedicine services, which require investments in resources like videoconferencing technologies, home monitoring devices and other IT infrastructure. Subscriptions, reimbursements and pay-per-use revenue streams were identified as feasible for commercializing telemedicine services.

  • 130.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Effects of a Home-based Monitoring Device on Innovation in Healthcare Delivery: A Pilot Study2013In: Information Systems and Technology for Organizations in a Networked Society / [ed] Tomayess Issa, Pedro Isaias and Piet Kommers, Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global, 2013, p. 316-334Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology has been suggested to improve patient health outcomes and reduce the burden of care. In this study, we explored the effects of collaborative innovation between caregivers and patients on healthcare delivery as a consequence of the use of an IT-based device by patients with atrial fibrillation. Two cardiologists and two nurses were interviewed while questionnaires were mailed to 75 patients querying them about the use of a home-based ECG for remote monitoring. Findings indicated that the caregivers considered the device to enhance the quality of clinical decision-making. Patients found the device to be useful and felt more involved in their own care. However, the introduction of the device presented work overload for the caregivers. Thus, the facilitation of timely diagnostics and decision-making were not realized. IT is an enabler through which innovation in healthcare delivery can be realized, but it must be integrated into work practices to realize potential benefits.

  • 131.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Handheld Electrocardiogram: Does ICT Contribute to Innovation in Healthcare Delivery?2012In: Proceedings of the IADIS international conference E-health 2012: part of the IADIS multi conference on Computer Science  and Information Systems / [ed] Mário Macedo, IADIS Press, 2012, p. 77-84Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Innovating healthcare through remote monitoring: Effects and business model2017In: Health Care Delivery and Clinical Science: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, IGI Global, 2017, p. 247-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology has been suggested to improve patient health outcomes and reduce healthcare cost. This study explored the business model and effects of collaborative innovation between caregivers and patients on healthcare delivery through remote patient monitoring by interviewing caregivers and surveying atrial fibrillation patients. Findings indicate that remote monitoring enhanced early detection of potential risks and quality of clinical decision-making with patients feeling more empowered and involved in their own care. The remote monitoring system which consisted of a home-based ECG and a web-based service and was offered free to patients, brought together caregivers, patients, service provider and the government as actors. The introduction of remote monitoring increased the workload of caregivers and facilitation of timely diagnostics and decision-making were not realized. IT is an enabler of innovation in healthcare, but it must be integrated into work processes with a viable business model to realize potential benefits and sustain it. 

  • 133.
    Achtenhagen, Claudia
    et al.
    Department of Structure and Regulation of VET – Industrial and Technical Occupations, Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung, Bonn, Germany.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    The impact of digital technologies on vocational education and training needs An exploratory study in the German food industry2019In: Education + Training, ISSN 0040-0912, E-ISSN 1758-6127, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 222-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Currently, the hype surrounding digitalization proclaims that the way in which companies create and capture value will change dramatically. Companies that adjust their business models to embrace digital technologies will need different skill sets and competences. Current research tends to focus on the impact of digital technologies on corporations or more generally the labor market, but the authors lack detailed insights into how companies perceive this development to influence their needs regarding employee qualifications. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore how companies perceive the impact of digital technologies on the education and training needs of current and future employees.

    Design/methodology/approach - This study draws on eight case studies from the food industry. It focuses on one occupation certified within the German “dual system” of vocational education and training (VET), the machine and plant operator with focus on food technology.

    Findings - The findings suggest that the impact of different digital technologies on employees’ job positions, working tasks and training needs is carefully considered in decisions regarding the implementation of digital technologies. Despite some company- specific contingencies, the perceived implications for VET needs are largely similar across the sample.

    Originality/value - This study draws attention to the importance of reviewing VET needs in relation to the decision of implementing digital technologies.

  • 134.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Book review: Fernando G. Alberti, Salvatore Sciascia, Carmine Tripodi and Federico Visconti, Entrepreneurial Growth in Industrial Districts: Four Italian Cases, Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, 2008; 269 pp.: 9781847200853, £69.00 (hbk)2010In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 428-430Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Book review: Managing Media Companies: Harnessing Creative Value (2nd ed.): by Annet Aris and Jacques Bughin, West Sussex, England: Wiley, 2009. ISBN 978-04-70713-95-2 (paperback), 384 pp.2011In: International Journal on Media Management, Vol. 13, p. 149-151Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Coordination in new forms of organising: an empirical study2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Coordination in newly emerging organizational forms1998In: Paper presented at the 14th EGOS Colloquium, Maastricht, July 1998, 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Co-ordination within new modes of organising1999In: Paper presented at the British Academy of Management Conference, Manchester, UK, September 1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Creating a film production cluster in Sweden's west: The case of 'Trollywood'2011In: Media Clusters: Spatial Agglomeration and Content Capabilities / [ed] Charlie Karlsson and Robert G. Picard, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 354-376Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Das aktuelle Interview: Cees J.A. van Lede, Chairman Akzo Nobel NV1995In: M & A Review, ISSN 0941-1089, no 7-8, p. 324-327Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 141.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Developing media management scholarship: a commentary to Picard and Lowe’s essay2016In: Journal of Media Business Studies, ISSN 1652-2354, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Entrepreneurial Failure in Germany: Stigma or Enigma2002In: Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2002: Proceedings of the twenty-second annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Babson Park, Mass.: Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship, Babson College , 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Entrepreneurs in media2012In: Encyclopedia of New Venture Management / [ed] Matthew R. Marvel, London: Sage Publications, 2012, p. 154-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Entrepreneurship: Unternehmertum als Weg aus der Krise2005In: drei: Das BPG-Magazin, Vol. 4, no September, p. 11-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 145.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Gender and Acquiring Resources2012In: Encyclopedia of New Venture Management / [ed] Matthew R. Marvel, London: Sage Publications, 2012, p. 209-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Industry Special: M&A-Aktivitäten in der deutschen Chemie- und Pharmaindustrie1997In: M & A Review, ISSN 0941-1089, no 6, p. 261-269Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 147.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Internationalization competence of SMEs2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Export has a positive impact on economic growth, and exporting companies often achieve a higher level of productivity than non-exporting companies. Most companies in Sweden are small, and it is of vital importance for the Swedish economy that they successfully develop and grow. In a small home-market economy like Sweden, an important direction for growth is to expand internationally. But many companies do not dare to internationalize due to a perceived lack of competence. This report aims at providing a comprehensive overview of academic research related to different kinds of competences relevant for the internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The overview leads into recommendations to SMEs regarding what kind of issues they might want to keep in mind when preparing for international business activities, e.g. to develop an appropriate set of resources and competences. In addition, implications relevant to policy-makers are derived from the literature overview.

  • 148.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Kommerzialisierung von Open Source-Software: Widerspruch oder Weiterentwicklung der Idee?2002In: Paper presented at the Kommission Organisation des Deutschen Hochschullehrerverbandes, Lüneburg, March 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    ‘Managing Media Companies: Harnessing Creative Value’, by Annet Aris and Jacques Bughin (2005), West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons2005In: Journal of Media Business Studies, ISSN 1652-2354, Vol. 2, no 2, Fall, p. 73-75Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Media entrepreneurship: Taking stock and moving forward2017In: JMM - The International Journal on Media Management, ISSN 1424-1277, E-ISSN 1424-1250, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial reviews current research about media entrepreneurship and introduces the four papers published in this special issue. These papers move the emerging academic field of media entrepreneurship forward by outlining the relevance of context for enhancing our understanding of entrepreneurial phenomena, by introducing the theoretical concept of ‘entrepreneuring as emancipation’, by analyzing the institutionalization of media entrepreneurship education, and by categorizing different investment types in corporate entrepreneurship. The editorial concludes by calling for continuing efforts to theory-building to further develop the field.

1234567 101 - 150 of 19828
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf