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  • 101.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Challenges and critical success factors for the design phase in Swedish industrialised house building2019In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual ARCOM Conference, 2-4 September 2019, Leeds, UK / [ed] Gorse & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019, p. 34-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The house building industry has been characterised as less productive compared to the manufacturing industry with numerous and challenging activities including a complex integration process. For the last 20 years, industrialised house building has gained increased research and industry attention and is identified as a potential way to improve the overall house building productivity. In the overall process, the design phase has been identified as the bottleneck with several disciplines which have to be coordinated to generate a design solution that meets various customer and market requirements. Many aspects of a building's performance depend on the decisions taken in the early design process. These decisions can have a substantial impact on the overall design, lead time, cost and quality of the final product. However, there are many other important factors which need to be considered by designers during the design phase. Less attention has been paid to the identification of these factors within the design phase of the industrialised house building. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to identify challenges and outline the critical success factors to be considered in the design phase of the Swedish industrialised house building. Qualitative research was conducted in combination with literature reviews and multiple case studies linking three Swedish house building companies. Empirical data were gathered from 20 semi-structured interviews. The study identified common challenges in the house building industry and 20 critical factors that should be addressed in the design phase from both literature and practitioners view. The result shows that fixed production is crucial for identifying the critical factors rather than a building system. Also, many challenges identified from this study could be managed by developing a platform-based approach with support tools and methods for critical factors in the design phase.

  • 102.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Impact on the Design Phase of Industrial Housing When Applying a Product Platform Approach2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] Vicente A. González, Chennai, India, 2018, p. 527-537Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a glulam-based post-beam building system, a variety of building solutions is offered on the market for multi-story buildings. The building system must be adaptable to the demands of each project. However, short lead-time, efficient manufacturing and assembly must be ensured. The use of product platforms has been acknowledged as an enabler to manage external (customer) and internal (production) efficiency. The building system cannot be locked to a set of standard components as a high level of customisation is required. A set of methods and tools is needed to support the design work and to ensure that solutions stay inside the boundaries of the platform definition. The aim of this work is to map the state-of-practice in the design phase for a glulam building system from a platform theory perspective and outline a path forward for applying a sustainable platform development in companies where a component-based product platform does not suffice. Empirical data were gathered from an on-going product platform development including interviews and document analysis. The results show the lack of definition in platform-based product development from a theoretical perspective and need for development of support methods for design that align with different production strategies

  • 103.
    Tharayil Pradeep, Ambareeksh
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Baradaran, Mohammadali
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    HPDC Die design for Additive Manufacturing: Simulation and Comparison of Thermal Stresses in HPDC die designed for Additive Manufacture2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing has a great potential to benefit die manufacture by shortening the lead time considerably and lifting the limitations on design complexity imposed by conventional manufacturing techniques. However, AM has its own requirements that together are known as Design for Additive Manufacturing and account for the process limitations. One of the significant requirements is mass efficiency of the design (it should be as light as possible). If it’s not fulfilled, AM won’t be able to make an economical solution or substitution despite having outstanding benefits. The present investigation has been framed with respect to such concern.

    This investigation attempts to draw a comparison between the performance of two design variants. Additionally, it has been tried to study the employed method, document implementation of the approach, and identify the challenges in accordance with design for additive manufacturing.

    Simulation of thermal stresses generated in die inserts for a given component during one cycle of high pressure die casting is presented. Initial design of the die inserts is subjected to redesign with the intention of mass reduction by incorporating honeycomb structure. Temperature evolution and resultant thermal stresses are analyzed for redesign and compared to those of original design.

    Simulation of high pressure die casting was carried out in MagmaSoft to obtain temperature history of die inserts and cast. Implicit nonlinear elastic fully coupled thermal displacement model was setup in Abaqus in which Magma results were used as input for stress calculation.

    Results show that according to our specific design, HPDC die with thin walled feature cannot withstand the thermal and mechanical load. However, with iterative analysis and proper topology optimization, a lightweight complex geometry die can be successfully made.

  • 104.
    Tolety, Somesh Bharadwaj
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Characterization of Fluid Flow in Continuous Casting through Physical and Numerical Modelling2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous casting transforms molten metal into solid continuously and includes a variety of important commercial processes. Continuous casting is a relatively new process in historical terms. The metals like 500 million tons of steel, 20 million tons of aluminum, and 1 million tons of copper, nickel and other metals in the world, are mass-produced using a continuous casting process. Continuous casting generally has higher capital costs but lower operating costs. It is the most cost and energy-efficient method to mass-produce semi-finished metal products with consistent quality in a variety of sizes and shapes.

    The current thesis project aims to develop a 1:1 scaled water model for a continuous slab caster capable of predicting surface waves, including both wave magnitude and traveling depth — where the results obtained from the thesis work used to validate 3D numerical models developed in OpenFOAM CFD toolbox.

    In the water model, probes are used on both the left and right sides of SEN to study the flow velocities; the air injected into the SEN to visualize the flow pattern. Likewise, the LES model is used to simulate the flow pattern in the numerical model.  

    The results from the water model experiment are compared with the numerical model.

     

  • 105.
    Ullal, Pratheek
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Development of Fluidity Measurement Technique and Automation of Measurement Station: Developing the existing Fluidity Measurement Station by automating the operation and measuring the fluidity digitally with MATLAB Image Processing Tools.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bryne AB has invented a device called Loop for measuring the fluidity of molten metal. Loop is made up of refractory fiber material and has a dimension of 196 sq.mm within which there is an engraved spiral shaped runway for the molten metal to flow. The distance traveled by the molten metal in the spiral determines its fluidity and is measured visually by the operator with the help of the spiral scale printed on the Loop. A workstation is used to support the Loop for an easier and better working environment. At present, the entire operation of fluidity measurement is done manually. The aim of the thesis is to develop an automatic workstation for the fluidity measurement and find a technique to measure the fluidity without human visual aid. Further, an attempt has been made to find a way to store and retrieve the measured values for future use.

     

    The automation of the workstation is done with the help of Arduino Uno circuit board for electrical connections and Arduino IDE for programming the circuit. MATLAB image processing tool is used for measuring the fluidity digitally.

     

    The prototype of the automated workstation is built and showcases the ability to reduce the time and operational errors. The automation of the unplugging operation saves up to 7 seconds.  The digital measuring of the fluidity with FLIR thermal camera and MATLAB image processing tool does not show significant improvement in accuracy in measurement, but it reduces the dependency on the expertise of the operator. There is an error of 12.7% from the actual fluidity value.

  • 106.
    Vanaja Murugesapillai, Anoop
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    HANDLE CONCEPT FOR STRING TRIMMER2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    String trimmers or weed cutter or strimmer is one of the inevitable tool for a professional gardener. They are helping gardeners for maintaining the lawn and farmland. These machines have been used by human for a quite long time. Professionals normally uses the bike handle type string trimmer and the amateurs who has small gardens normally uses loop handle one. The bike handle models are more powerful and gives more comfort for long time working. While performing the trimming process users are using the handles to steer and control the machine. Handle is the main touch point of the machine and it needs to provide enough comfort and assist the functions.Cramer, a German garden tools brand owned by The Globe Group, is focusing on researching and developing Garden power tools for amateurs as well as professional users. For them it is important to satisfy the customer and improve the user experience of their products.This project is focused only on the handle of the string trimmer to improve the overall user experience. This project mainly deals with the ergonomic aspects of the handle for a larger percentile of population. It is very important to make a handle were the professional users are going to use longer period of time. Along with the comfort this project put stress on increase the user experience by giving modern, friendly and premium expression visually as well as physically. Even though the project is to develop a handle concept, it needs to go along with the overall brand language.

  • 107.
    Vestin, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Träcentrum Nässjö Kompetensutveckling AB, Nässjö, Sweden.
    On the way to a smart factory for single-family wooden house builders in Sweden2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    To remain competitive, single-family wooden house builders might create smart wooden house factories. Smart factories and smart production are recent concepts used to denote ideas that support competitiveness in for example the automotive industry. In the housing sector, a concept introduced to increase competitiveness is industrialized house-building. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate whether industrialized house-building characteristics could be a step toward a smart factory for wooden house builders. In this paper, ideas of the smart wooden house factory are synthesized, and challenges for the single-family wooden house builder are identified. The study is founded on empirical data from one single-case study. A challenge identified was the maturity level of the culture and organization to commit to and utilize modern technology and modern working methods. The concept of the smart wooden house factory is still in its infancy and needs further research.

  • 108.
    Vijayakumar, Vivek
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Tom, Arun
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Lead a concept proof to use RFID technology in tracing of bulky goods in logistics: Bring Logistics, Torsvik2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 109.
    Warren, Brendan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    The Design and Development of a Modular Cargo Pedelec: A pragmatic approach to a multifaceted product design and development process2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Working in collaboration with Spirit Design – Innovation and Brand GmbH in Vienna, Austria, this thesis project aimed to design and develop a modular cargo pedelec for immediate implementation into the European market.

    The vehicle, named Carr/e (pronounced, “carry”), is designed to be an electrically assisted (e-assist) pedaled urban cargo vehicle with versatile applications ranging from parcel delivery toprivate consumer use. Modularity was necessitated in order to accommodate all use cases. Sustainability and reducing socioeconomic pressures from urban congestion were a focus within the design methodology.

    The development of the project involved elements of design and engineering with holistic, value-driven, development strategies; a pragmatic approach was emphasized. Additionally, a brand was devised for the pedelec. The aim of the brand is to facilitate consumer recognition and, thus, market prevalence. Ultimately, an empirically validated product with a market-driven design was devised. Next steps will be to physically validate the pedelec with working prototypes before it is introduced into the European market.

  • 110.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Research Results Improve Learning and Understanding in Master Courses - The use of a manufacturing strategy tool2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 47-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analytical STRATEGO-tool has been used in total 48 project groups in master courses at Chalmers University of Technology from spring term of 2015. The project trains the students in applying theoretical tools at real organizations with a specific interest in analyzing their use of operations strategy. This paper presents the outcome from these courses and specifically discusses its usability as a pedagogic tool in different contexts, even though the intention with the tool initially was to constitute a tool for SMEs who wanted to develop their manufacturing strategies. 

  • 111.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Management of the industrialisation process in distributed geographical and organisational contexts2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of new product development (NPD) is one of the most critical capabilities of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). The industrialisation process plays a major role in NPD, where the final verification of the product and production system takes place. It is during the industrialisation process that various disturbances arise; if these are not managed, they can delay the production start and prolong production ramp up.

    Based on two dimensions, geographical and organisational distribution, the following four different types of contexts are defined in this thesis: industrialisation in the local and intra-organisational context (type 1), industrialisation in the local and inter-organisational context (type 2), industrialisation in the international and intra-organisational context (type 3) and industrialisation in international and inter-organisational context (type 4). This thesis addresses types 2–4 and contributes to the literature, which has primarily dealt with the type 1 context. The purpose of the research presented in the thesis is expanding the knowledge on the industrialisation process in distributed geographical and/or organisational contexts with a focus on challenges and mechanisms; this will serve to control the challenges during the industrialisation process.

    The findings are based on data from three studies in the manufacturing industry, covering both single and multiple case studies. They reveal that there are some similarities between the type 2–4 contexts and challenges and mechanisms previously identified for the type 1 context. However, several unique challenges and mechanisms are found for the type 2–4 contexts. The findings also show that the challenges can be characterised as internal and external. Internal challenges appear in a single industrialisation site and are associated with internal organisational capabilities at the site. External challenges originate from the research and development (R&D) site and the integration between the R&D and industrialisation sites.

    The findings also reveal that the identified challenges disrupt the industrialisation process in various ways and create uncertainty and equivocality during the industrialisation process. The studies presented in this thesis show that, to deal with challenges that create uncertainty and equivocality, it is wise to allow ad hoc mechanisms to be used. One of the key conclusions is that when the industrialisation processes are carried out in type 2–4 contexts, there is a need to allow for flexibility regarding the use of mechanisms depending on the dynamics associated with the specific context.

  • 112.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Ahlin, Peter
    Husqvarna AB, Huskvarna, Sweden.
    Visual representations for communication in geographically distributed new product development projects2019In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 30, no 8-9, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the role of visual representations in supporting communication between an R&D team and geographically distributed suppliers for a new product development (NPD) project. It specifically focuses on the design and use of visual representations as a feasible way for communication between the distributed actors when they face communication challenges originating from differences in skills in the English language, but also from differences in work experiences. Relying on empirical materials from a Swedish manufacturing company in the mechanical engineering industry, this paper makes the following contributions to the literature. First, it shows that visual representations are effective boundary objects able to support process-oriented and product-oriented communication in distributed NPD projects. Second, it illustrates that visual representations do not necessarily have to follow graphic design principles, but can still be effective if distributed actors share the same project context. Finally, it highlights the need for a dynamic and context-dependent perspective on communication in NPD projects. 

  • 113.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, G.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Managing disturbances during the industrialisation process from a supplier perspectiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM–supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research.

    Findings: This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM–supplier integration, the OEM’s research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM’s (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM–supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator’s role, the OEM’s face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers’ formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally.

    Originality/value: This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up. 

  • 115.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Integration of Suppliers’ Workflows in the OEMs’ New Product Development Process2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 479-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores integration of the suppliers’ workflows in the OEM’s new product development (NPD) process, to support the production ramp-up. Based on multiple-case study approach, incorporating both the OEM and the supplier perspective, this research explains critical aspects for the integration of suppliers’ workflows in the OEM’s NPD process, and when these aspects need to be addressed. The results show that face-to-face meeting on a project level, standardized work model, readiness of the component specifications, role of Supplier Quality Assurance (SQA) engineer, quality assurance document provided to the suppliers, etc. are critical aspects.

  • 116.
    Wognum, Nel
    et al.
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Bil, Cees
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Peruzzini, Margherita
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Stjepandić, Josip
    PROSTEP AG, Germany.
    Verhagen, Wim
    Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands .
    Transdisciplinary Engineering Research Challenges2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 753-762Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research (TDR) has been the subject of discourse in the past few decades, but has not been studied much in the context of engineering problems. Many engineering problems can be characterized as ill-defined, like open innovation, adoption of new technology, business development, and the adoption of the Industry 4.0 concept. Transdisciplinary engineering research (TDER) is also performed in large projects by multi-disciplinary teams, as in TDR projects, including stakeholders and people from practice. Such projects may last long, often years. In such large projects, the involved disciplines should include both engineering disciplines as well as disciplines from social sciences. In this paper we address the challenges that exist in adopting a TDER approach. Universities need to prepare students to work in TDER projects. We discuss the current situation in transdisciplinary engineering education (TDEE) and identify challenges that need to be addressed for including TDEE in curricula. The paper ends with a summary and ideas for further research.

  • 117.
    Wognum, Nel
    et al.
    ATO Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technical University of Delft, Netherlands.
    Bil, Cees
    School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Peruzzini, Margherita
    Department Engineering Enzo Ferrari, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Stjepandić, Josip
    PROSTEP AG, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Verhagen, Wim J.C.
    ATO Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technical University of Delft, Netherlands.
    Transdisciplinary systems engineering: Implications, challenges and research agenda2019In: International Journal of Agile Systems and Management, ISSN 1741-9174, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 58-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary processes have been the subject of research since several decades already. Transdisciplinary processes are aimed at solving ill-defined and socially relevant problems. Many researchers have studied transdisciplinary processes and have tried to understand the essentials of transdisciplinarity. Many engineering problems can be characterised as ill-defined and socially relevant, too. Although transdisciplinary engineering cannot widely be found in the literature yet, a transdisciplinary approach is deemed relevant for many engineering problems. With this paper we aim to present an overview of the literature on research into transdisciplinary processes and investigate the relevance of a transdisciplinary approach in engineering domains. After a brief description of past research on transdisciplinarity, implications for engineering research, engineering practice, and engineering education are identified. In all three areas, the current situation is described, while challenges are identified that still exist. The paper ends with a research agenda for transdisciplinary engineering. 

  • 118.
    Ölvander, J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Wever, R.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Warell, A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rönnbäck, A. Ö.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Isaksson, O.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Larsson, T.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Steinert, M.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Ekman, K.
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Hansen, P. K.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Juuti, T.
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Malmqvist, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ritzén, S.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sæmundsson, R. J.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Hansen, C. T.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Preface2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, Linköping: Design Research Society, 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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