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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy, Speech pathology and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Content validity and usefulness of Picture My Participation for measuring participation in children with and without intellectual disability in South Africa and Sweden2020Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, nr 5, s. 336-348Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation comprises attendance and involvement in everyday situations. Picture My Participation (PmP) is an instrument intended to measure participation in children with disabilities, particularly in low and middle income countries.

    Aim: To investigate content validity and usefulness of PmP for measuring participation in children with intellectual disability (ID) in South Africa and Sweden.

    Methods: A picture supported interview with 149 children, 6?18 years, with and without ID. Twenty everyday activities were provided. The three most important activities were selected by the child. Attendance was rated on all activities. Involvement was rated on the most important.

    Results: All activities were selected as important by at least one child with ID in both countries. There were similarities in perceived importance between the children with and without ID from South Africa. The children from South Africa with ID were the only subgroup that used all scale points for rating attendance and involvement.

    Conclusion: The 20 selected activities of PmP were especially relevant for children with ID in South Africa. The usefulness of the scales was higher for the children with ID in both countries. PmP is promising for assessing participation across different settings but psychometrical properties and clinical utility need further exploration.

  • 2.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University, Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Faculty of Humanities, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medical, Dental and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Shi, Lin Jun
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University, Heping District, China.
    Kang, Lin Ju
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Structural validity and internal consistency of Picture My Participation: A measure for children with disability2021Inngår i: African Journal of Disability, ISSN 2226-7220, Vol. 10, artikkel-id a763Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Picture My Participation (PMP) intended to measure participation, defined as attendance and involvement in everyday situations, of children with disabilities, particularly in low- and middle-income settings.

    Objectives: To explore structural validity of PMP by identifying possible subcomponents in the attendance scale and examining internal consistency of the total score and each subcomponent.

    Method: A picture-supported interview was conducted with 182 children, 7–18 years, with and without intellectual disability (ID). Frequency of attendance in 20 activities was rated on a four-point Likert scale (never, seldom, sometimes and always).

    Results: An exploratory principal component analysis extracted four subcomponents: (1) organised activities, (2) social activities and taking care of others, (3) family life activities and 4) personal care and development activities. Internal consistency for the total scale (alpha = 0.85) and the first two subcomponents (alpha = 0.72 and 0.75) was acceptable. The two last subcomponents alpha values were 0.57 and 0.49.

    Conclusion: The four possible subcomponents of PMP can be used to provide information about possible domains in which participation and participation restrictions exist. This study provided further psychometric evidence about PMP as a measure of participation. The stability and the utility of these subcomponents needed further exploration.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Birgitta
    Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hayat Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the group intervention “Let’s Get Organized” for improving time management, organisational, and planning skills in people with mild intellectual disability2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, nr 8, s. 1257-1266Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Limited time management skills cause problems in daily life for people with mild intellectual disability (ID) and “Let’s Get Organized” (LGO) is a promising manual-based occupational therapy group intervention aiming to support management skills.

    Aims/Objectives: To evaluate the applicability of the Swedish version of LGO-S by i) exploring enhancements in time management skills, satisfaction with daily occupations, and aspects of executive functioning in people with time-management difficulties and mild ID, and ii) describing clinical experiences of using the LGO-S for people with mild ID.

    Material and methods: Twenty-one adults with mild ID were included. Data were collected pre-/post-intervention and at 3- and 12-month follow-ups with: Swedish version of Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S), Satisfaction with Daily Occupation (SDO-13), and Weekly Calendar Planning Activity (WCPA-SE). There were few follow-up participants (n = 6-9).

    Results: Significant change in time management skills that maintained at 12-months follow-ups. Significant increase in regulation of emotions at 12-month follow-up. Results at 12-months follow-up indicated sustainability in outcomes as measured by ATMS-S. A non-significant positive trend was observed in other outcomes between pre- and post-intervention.

    Conclusions and significance: LGO-S seems applicable for improving skills in time management, organisation and planning also for people with mild ID.

  • 4.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Region Gävleborg.
    Storfors, T.
    Wilder, J.
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    IDENTIFICATION OF POSSIBLE LEARNING PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES2023Inngår i: The Routledge Handbook of Inclusive Education for Teacher Educators: Issues, Considerations, and Strategies, Taylor & Francis, 2023, s. 256-265Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    All children have the right to become equal citizens of the society. Children with intellectual disabilities have difficulties in learning and may need support to reach that equality, and some extra resources may be needed. Compared to children with typical development, children with intellectual disabilities have problems in three cognitive areas that are essential for learning activities: Abstract thinking. Understanding/using abstract symbols (text, numbers, money, and time) and imagining non-experienced things and situations. Several-steps thinking. Understanding multiple-level instructions and connections between cause and effect. Simultaneous handling of information. Nuanced considerations/comparisons, risk considerations and problem solving that manifest in complex social situations. Endorsing an interactive bio-psycho-social understanding of intellectual disabilities implies that learning limitations are the discrepancy between abilities and the level and/or quality of support, and according to this an inclusive approach to learning should be based on knowledge about abilities rather than dis-abilities. Two inclusive classroom strategies for learning are presented and discussed in this chapter. These strategies seek ways of providing universal, inclusive learning situations where children with intellectual disability can interact with any children and the most important role for a teacher is to find ways to support the children in that interaction.

  • 5.
    Balton, Sadna
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Test-retest reliability of Picture My Participation in children with intellectual disability in South Africa2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 315-324Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Picture My Participation (PmP) is a promising instrument for measuring the participation in everyday situations of children with intellectual disability (ID), particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

    Aim

    To explore test-retest reliability of PmP by comparing two repeated measurements of children with ID in an urban context in South Africa.

    Methods

    A picture-supported interview with 31 children with ID, aged 7-17 years, was conducted twice, two weeks apart. The children rated their participation, operationalised as attendance and involvement, in 20 everyday activities. Analyses were completed for total scores, for the four subcomponents and at item level.

    Results

    Test-retest agreement at an item level for both attendance and involvement showed slight/fair agreement for most activities (Kappa = 0.01-0.40), and moderate agreement for some activities (Kappa = 0.41?0.60). Moderate agreement was shown for the total scale and at component level (ICC = 0.5?0.75), except for (firstly) attendance of and involvement in 'Family Activities' (ICC = 0.26 for attendance, 0.33 for involvement), and (secondly) involvement in 'Personal Activities' (ICC = 0.33).

    Conclusion

    The result indicates that PmP can reliably be used at component level and as a screening tool for intervention planning to identify participation and participation restrictions in children with ID.

  • 6.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Vuxenhabiliteringen i Region Gävleborg.
    Delaktighet2021Inngår i: Leva som andra: Ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv på funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder / [ed] L. Kilman, J. Andin, H. Hua & J. Rönnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, s. 309-325Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, SUF Resource Centre, Region Uppsala, Centre for Clinical Research in Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gävleborg/Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden.
    Randell, Eva
    Department of Social Work, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Efficacy of a school-based intervention to influence attitudes about future parenting among Swedish youth with intellectual disability: An RCT study2023Inngår i: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 1000-1012Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The study aim was to investigate the efficacy of an intervention designed to provide a basis for informed choices about future parenthood to special upper secondary school students with intellectual disabilities.

    Methods: A randomised trial with a waiting list control group was used. In total, 108 special upper secondary school students with mild or moderate intellectual disabilities, age 16–21 years, provided informed consent and participated. The intervention included education using the Parenting Toolkit and a Real Care Baby simulator. The analyses included 91 students (intervention group n = 46, 24F/22M; control group n = 45, 26F/19M).

    Results: The result showed that intervention group changed their attitudes to future parenting, from ‘do not know’ to ‘know’, significantly more than control group. The intervention increased knowledge levels in the intervention group.

    Conclusions: The intervention group showed increased ability to make informed choices and decisions about parenthood.

  • 8.
    Materne, Marie
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, SE-70185 Orebro, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Sch Law Psychol & Social Work, Orebro, Sweden..
    Frank, Andre
    Ctr Adult Habilitat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    The utility of goal attainment scaling in evaluating a structured water dance intervention for adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities2021Inngår i: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 7, nr 9, artikkel-id e07902Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) have problems to be actively involved in essential life activities that affect their health. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of goal attainment scaling (GAS) in evaluating an intervention for adults with PIMD, and to describe how the GAS goals were set according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains of body function as well as activity and participation. Method: As part of an aquatic intervention (Structured water dance), 28 adults with PIMD received GAS goals which were adapted to their individual needs and which the intervention could affect. Result: Twenty of the goals were formulated within the ICF Activity/Participation domain and eight within the Body Functions domains. On average, participants improved by 1.25 levels on the five-level GAS scales. Conclusion: GAS can be a useful tool for setting and evaluating individualized and meaningful goals, in body functions as well as in activity and participation, related to a healthpromoting activity for adults with PIMD.

  • 9.
    White, Suzanne Marie
    et al.
    Alithia D Alleyne, Brooklyn, NY USA..
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Janeslatt, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmqvist, Kajsa Lidstroem
    Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Let's Get Organized: A Group Intervention for Improving Time Management-A Pilot Study2021Inngår i: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, artikkel-id 106137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 10.
    Wingren, Maria
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Holmqvist, Kajsa Lidstroem
    Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Roshanai, Afsaneh
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Janeslott, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    White, Suzanne Marie
    SUNY Downstate Hlth Sci Univ, Brooklyn, NY USA..
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Improved Time Management Skills After the Intervention Let's Get Organized Are Maintained Over Time2021Inngår i: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, artikkel-id 106137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 11.
    Wingren, Maria
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Roshanai, Afsaneh Hayat
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gävleborg/Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden;e Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    White, Suzanne
    Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY, United States.
    Holmefur, Marie
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    One-year follow-up after the time management group intervention let’s get organized2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 305-314Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Time management skills are essential to maintain occupations in everyday life. People with neurodevelopmental or mental disorders often experience persistent difficulties with managing time and organizing daily life, consequently, there is a need to establish interventions with sustainable results.

    Aim: The aim was to perform a one-year post-intervention follow-up after the intervention Let’s Get Organized (LGO-S) for people with neurodevelopmental or mental disorders.

    Methods: The study is a one-year follow-up of a single group pre-test–post-test design. Thirty-eight persons with difficulties in time management due to neurodevelopmental or mental disorders participated. Instruments to collect data were Assessment of Time Management Skills; Weekly Calendar Planning Activity and the Satisfaction with Daily Occupations instrument. Wilcoxons’s signed-rank test was used to compare data over time.

    Results: There were no significant differences in the participants’ outcomes between post-intervention and one-year follow-up in time management skills and regulation of emotions, satisfaction with daily occupations, and global satisfaction. A significant improvement could be seen in the subscale organization and planning at the one-year follow-up compared to post-intervention.

    Conclusions: Improvements in time management skills, organization, and planning, regulation of emotions, and satisfaction with daily occupations after the LGO-S can be maintained in the long term.

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