Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 28 of 28
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, CHESS.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholms Universitet, CHESS.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Forskningsplattformen socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Statens folkhälsoinstitut, Östersund.
    Peer acceptance in the school class and subjective health complaints: A multilevel approach2013Inngår i: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 83, nr 10, s. 690-696Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Feeling accepted by peers is important for young people's health but few studies have examined the overall degree of acceptance in school and its health consequences. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether health complaints among Swedish students can be attributed to the acceptance climate in their school class even when the health effects of their own (individual) acceptance score have been taken into account.

    METHODS

    The data used were from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study for the years 2001 to 2002, 2005 to 2006, and 2009 to 2010, consisting of 13,902 5th-, 7th-, and 9th-grade Swedish students nested into 742 school classes. The statistical analyses were performed by means of linear regression multilevel analysis.

    RESULTS

    The results indicated that the variation in subjective health complaints could be ascribed partly to the school-class level (boys: 5.0%; girls: 13.5%). Peer acceptance at the individual level demonstrated a clear association with health: the lower the acceptance, the higher the complaint scores. For girls, but not for boys, the overall degree of peer acceptance in the school class demonstrated a contextual effect on health, net of acceptance at the student level. Interaction analyses also revealed an increasingly favorable health among poorly accepted girls as the acceptance climate in the school class declined.

    CONCLUSIONS

    A lower overall degree of peer acceptance in the school class is associated with poorer health among girls. However, girls who themselves feel poorly accepted are not as negatively affected health-wise by a poor acceptance climate, as are well-accepted girls.

  • 2.
    Arnarsson, Arsaell
    et al.
    Iceland.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University.
    Torsheim, Torbjorn
    Norway.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Bjereld, Ylva
    University of Gothenburg.
    Markkanen, Ilona
    Finland.
    Schnohr, Christina W
    Denmark.
    Rasmussen, Mette
    Denmark.
    Nielsen, Line
    Denmark.
    Bendtsen, Pernille
    Denmark.
    Cyberbullying and traditional bullying among Nordic adolescents and their impact on life satisfaction2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cybervictimization in the six Nordic countries and to assess its overlap with traditional bullying. A further aim was to examine potential associations between life satisfaction, on the one hand, and traditional bullying and cyberbullying on the other.

    METHODS: Analyses were based on data from the 2013⁄2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. It included 32,210 boys and girls, aged 11, 13, and 15, living in the six Nordic countries.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of cyberbullying by both pictures and by messages was around 2% in all the Nordic countries except Greenland. There it was considerably higher. The prevalence of being bullied in a traditional manner varied widely by country. For boys, this type of bullying was most frequent in the youngest age group and then decreased steadily in the older age groups. Girls were on average more likely to be cyberbullied. Cyberbullying was more common among 13- and 15-year-olds than 11-year-olds. Higher family affluence was unrelated to the risk of cyberbullying. However, it was related to traditional bullying and combined forms of bullying. Compared with intact families, cybervictimization was commoner among single-parent families and stepfamilies. Adjusting for age, gender, family affluence, and family structure, those subjected to cyberbullying had lower life satisfaction than those who were not bullied.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found relatively little overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, indicating that the two may be separate phenomena stemming from different mechanisms, at least in the Nordic context.

  • 3.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Statens folkhälsoinstitut.
    Ljungdahl, Sofia
    Statens folkhälsoinstitut.
    Bremberg, Sven
    Statens folkhälsoinstitut.
    Är depression en klassfråga? En systematisk litteraturöversikt över kopplingen mellan social klass och depression2008Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Linking youths’ mental, psychosocial, and emotional functioning to ICF-CY: Lessons learned2018Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, nr 19, s. 2293-2299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Linking ready-made questionnaires to codes within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version with the intention of using the information statistically for studying mental health problems can pose several challenges. Many of the constructs measured are latent, and therefore, difficult to describe in single codes. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss challenges encountered in this coding process.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire from a Swedish research programme was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version and the agreement was assessed.

    Results: Including the original aim of the questionnaire into the coding process was found to be very important for managing the coding of the latent constructs of the items. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version chapters with narrow definitions for example mental functions, were more easily translated to meaningful concepts to code, while broadly defined chapters, such as interactions and relationships, were more difficult.

    Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of a clear, predefined coding scheme as well as the importance of not relying too heavily on common linking rules, especially in cases when it is not possible to use multiple codes for a single item.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, is a useful tool for merging assessment data from several sources when documenting adolescents’ mental functioning in different life domains.

    • Measures of mental health are often based on latent constructs, often revealed in the description of the rationale/aim of a measure. The latent construct should be the primary focus in linking information.

    • By mapping latent constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version, users of the classification can capture a broad range of areas relevant to everyday functioning in adolescents with mental health problems.

    • The subjective experience of participation, i.e., the level of subjective involvement, is not possible to code into the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version. However, when linking mental health constructs to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth Version codes, the two dimensions of participation (the being there, and the level of involvement) need to be separated in the linking process. This can be performed by assigning codes focusing on being there as separate from items focusing on the subjective experience of involvement while being there.

  • 5.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, nr 74Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

  • 6.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 572-583Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

  • 7.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show a trajectory of higher incidence of school failure. High quality teaching and proper support may foster high self-efficacy, as protective factors for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy is promoted. At transition into high school with higher cognitive stakes, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding, a disability may add to the challenge of success. Investigating self-efficacy as a predictor of achievement operationalized as grade points, student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE, and teacher rated teaching quality are examined.

    Method: Three groups were studied, students with 1. Diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades and 3. High grades in PE in year 6. Questionnaires were completed by students in 26 classes including classmates (n=450, 228 boys) and their PE-teachers (n=25). Correlations were analyzed, differentiating groups of students.

    Results: Students with disabilities experience lower general self-efficacy and in PE, and are less apt to participate in PE. Their PE self-efficacy is higher if the classroom climate is good. PE-teachers systematic work with grading has positive effects on academic and movement self-efficacy for students with low grades and on health self-efficacy for students with high grades. Highest effect of perceived socio-cognitive function is displayed in students with low grades, the correlation is stronger in general self-efficacy than in self-efficacy in PE. Students with high grades have higher self-efficacy in general and in PE.

    Conclusions: Student perceived socio-cognitive function is of major importance to students experience of self-efficacy. Most impact is seen on subscales measuring academic and movement self-efficacy.

  • 8.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 9.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    SIDR, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in Physical Education2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018Inngår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 387-401Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 11.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Klang, Nina
    Lillvist, Anne
    The international classification of functioning, disability and health and the version for children and youth as a tool in child habilitation/early childhood intervention: feasibility and usefulness as a common language and frame of reference for practice2010Inngår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, nr S1, s. 125-138Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Early childhood intervention and habilitation services for children with disabilities operate on an interdisciplinary basis. It requires a common language between professionals, and a shared framework for intervention goals and intervention implementation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the version for children and youth (ICF-CY) may serve as this common framework and language. This overview of studies implemented by our research group is based on three research questions: Do the ICF-CY conceptual model have a valid content and is it logically coherent when investigated empirically? Is the ICF-CY classification useful for documenting child characteristics in services? What difficulties and benefits are related to using ICF-CY model as a basis for intervention when it is implemented in services? A series of studies, undertaken by the CHILD researchers are analysed. The analysis is based on data sets from published studies or master theses. Results and conclusion show that the ICF-CY has a useful content and is logically coherent on model level. Professionals find it useful for documenting children's body functions and activities. Guidelines for separating activity and participation are needed. ICF-CY is a complex classification, implementing it in services is a long-term project.

  • 12.
    Carney, J.
    et al.
    Rehabilitation Department, Kennedy Krieger Rehabilitation Institute, Baltimore, United States.
    Fisher, R.
    Baltimore, United States.
    Augutis, M.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Charlifue, S.
    Research Department, Craig Hospital, CO USA, Englewood, United States.
    Biering-Sørensen, F.
    Neuroscience Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Department of Spinal Cord Injuries, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Höfers, W.
    Physiotherapy Department, Sunnaas Hospital, Norway.
    Hwang, M.
    Research Department, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Chicago, Mexico.
    Wayne New, P.
    Epworth-Monash Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Epidemilogy and Preventitive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Post, M.
    Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Utrecht and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sadowsky, C.
    Rehabilitation Department, Kennedy Krieger Rehabilitation Institute, Baltimore, United States.
    Vogel, L.
    Research Department, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Chicago, Mexico.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dent, K.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Center for Outcomes and Measurement, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jefferson (Philadelphia University+Thomas Jefferson University), Philadelphia, PA USA.
    Mulcahey, M. J.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Center for Outcomes and Measurement, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jefferson (Philadelphia University+Thomas Jefferson University), Philadelphia, PA USA.
    Development of the International Spinal Cord Injury/Dysfunction Education Basic Data Set2019Inngår i: Spinal cord series and cases, ISSN 2058-6124, Vol. 5Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design:Consensus among international experts.

    Objectives: The objective of this project was to develop the International Spinal Cord Injury/Dysfunction (SCI/D) Education Basic Data Set. Setting: International expert working group.

    Methods: The published guidelines for developing the International SCI Basic Data Sets were used to develop the International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set. Existing measures and literature on education and disability were reviewed to develop a preliminary draft of the basic education data set through iterative modifications via biweekly conference calls and email communication. The draft was disseminated to the larger International Workgroup for Development of Pediatric SCI/D Basic Data Sets and then to the members of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS), American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), and relevant expert groups and interested individuals for comments. All feedback received was taken into consideration before the final data set was approved by ISCoS and ASIA.

    Results: The finalized version of the International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set Version 1.0 contains 16 items divided into three domains: school setting/therapeutic services, school participation/academic success, and barriers/attitudes. Most of the variables have been adapted from established measures. This data set is intended for children and youth up to and including high school, but not for emerging adults in higher education or postsecondary vocational training or trade schools.

    Conclusion: The International SCI/D Education Basic Data Set has been developed for collection of a minimal amount of highly relevant information on the education experience in children and youth with SCI/D. Further validation work is needed.

    Sponsorship: This project was funded by the Rick Hansen Institute, Research Award #G2015-27 (Mulcahey, PI). 

  • 13.
    Fismen, Anne-Siri
    et al.
    Norge.
    Smith, Otto Robert Frans
    Norge.
    Torsheim, Torbjørn
    Norge.
    Rasmussen, Mette
    Danmark.
    Pedersen Pagh, Trine
    Danmark.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Ojala, Kristiina
    Finland.
    Samdal, Oddrun
    Norge.
    Trends in food habits and their relation to socioeconomic status among Nordic adolescents 2001/2002-2009/20102016Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries.

    Methods

    The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data.

    Results

    Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft drink consumption. Socioeconomic inequalities in fruit and vegetable consumption were observed in all countries, with no cross-country differences, and no changes over time. Small but not significant cross-country variation was identified for SES inequalities in sweet consumption. Reduced SES inequalities were observed in Sweden between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. SES was not associated with soft drink consumption in this study population, with the exception of Denmark for the survey year 2009/2010.

    Conclusion

    Different trends resulted in increased country differences in food habits during the time of observations. In survey year 2009/2010, Danish students reported a higher intake of fruit and vegetable consumption than their counterparts in the other Nordic countries. Finnish students reported the lowest frequency of sweets and soft drink consumption. Despite the positive dietary trends documented in the present study, the majority of Nordic adolescents are far from meeting national dietary recommendations. Our findings underline the need for more comprehensive initiatives targeting young people's food habits as well as a more deliberate and focused action to close gaps in social inequalities that affect food choices.

  • 14.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Niia, Anna
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Eriksson-Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Swedish Institute of Public Health, Östersund.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Differentiating activity and participation of children and youth with disability in Sweden: A third qualifier in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health for Children and Youth?2012Inngår i: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 91, nr 13, s. S84-S96Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This article discusses the use of a third qualifier, subjective experience of involvement, as a supplement to the qualifiers of capacity and performance, to anchor activity and participation as separate endpoints on a continuum of actions.

    Design: Empirical data from correlational studies were used for secondary analyses. The analyses were focused on the conceptual roots of the participation construct as indicated by the focus of policy documents, the support for a third qualifier as indicated by correlational data, differences between self-ratings and ratings by others in measuring subjective experience of involvement, and the empirical support for a split between activity and participation in different domains of the activity and participation component.

    Results: Participation seems to have two conceptual roots, one sociologic and one psychologic. The correlational pattern between the qualifiers of capacity, performance, and subjective experience of involvement indicates a possible split between activity and participation. Self-ratings of participation provide information not obtained through ratings by others, and later domains in the activities and participation component fit better with measures of experienced involvement than earlier domains did.

    Conclusions: The results from secondary analyses provide preliminary support for the use of a third qualifier measuring subjective experience of involvement to facilitate the split between activity and participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth version, activity and participation domain.

  • 15.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Trejo, Karina
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Björk, Eva
    Participatory profiles of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: With and without mental health issues2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 16.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Kristianstad University.
    Perceived needs among parents of children with a mild intellectual disability in Sweden2017Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 307-317Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of children with a mild intellectual disability experience more distress and require more support than other parents. The aim was to investigate the perceived family needs of parents of children with an MID and to investigate the relationship between parents’ perceived self-efficacy in their parental role and in collaborating with professionals as well as with their perceived needs for support. Interviews were based on questionnaires to the parents of 38 children. The results revealed that parents perceived need for information, respite, and venues in which to meet other parents in similar situations. The informational needs were related to parental self-efficacy and obtaining support. A lower need for information was related to higher perceived control over services. In conclusion, it appears that professionals need to work to strengthen parents’ ability to ask for support and to express the needs. Well-informed parents will develop stronger parental self-efficacy and perceived control over services.

  • 17.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, s. 1-13, artikkel-id 28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though participation in everyday events is a vital part in the fulfilment of human rights, adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders often face participation restrictions in every-day activities. Few studies have investigated the predictors for participation in different contexts, over time and in relation to the same outcome variables. The objective of the current study was therefore to investigate predictors of change in participation operationalized as frequency of attendance and perceived importance in domestic life activities, peer related activities, and school activities as experienced by adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Associations with participation, both in terms of frequency and perceived importance, in domestic life, peer relations, and the school setting were investigated using six independent variables measuring experience of time and self, sex, age, stress, support from siblings, and atmosphere in family at two-time (with approximately 2 years in between). The sample consisted of adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders (n= 916). Adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders were n=154 and adolescents without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders was n= 762. Data was collected via self-reported questionnaires administered in schools. Results: Three key findings are presented. 1) more factors were associated with participation outcomes at time1 for adolescents without NDD than for adolescents with NDD, but this difference in the number of factors decreases with time; 2) few associations were related to time for both adolescents with and without NDD; and 3) patterns of predicting variables were different for adolescents with and without NDD. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the factors related to participation in and outside school differs between groups, when the impairment or disability is not considered as a predictor for participation. This study supports the need for using a multidimensional developmental and contextual perspective in addressing enhanced participation for adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 18.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Kapetanovic, S.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairmentsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 19.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Swedish National Institute for Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Frequency and intensity ratings of school-related participation experiences2011Inngår i: NNDR 2011 11th Research Conference: Abstracts, 2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares the self-reported experience of pupils with an additional support need(including children with disabilities) of being involved with what they were thinking or doing with aview to creating a measure of intensity by using these research questions:When thinking and doing descriptions are positively correlated is a child involved in an activity?Does this correlate with whether the child thinks he or she was focused on the activity?How does the frequency and intensity of participation of school-aged children with additional needsin an educational setting manifest itself within the International Classification of Functioning,Disability & Health, Child & Youth version (ICF-CY) framework?MethodsData were gathered from an existing study of participation in school environments of students withdisabilities in Sweden carried out by the second author. The data-set consists of data collected fromschools which contain both frequency and intensity data. The frequency data are in the form ofquestionnaires and the intensity data came from self-reports. The data came from self-reportingquestionnaires gathered a random points during the course of a normal school week by prompting22 children with additional needs and 22 controls with pagers. Data about what each child wasthinking about and doing will be analysed along with data on the child’s rating of being focused.Additional data were gathered relating to the child’s mood, interpretation of the importance andcomplexity of the situation, and with whom they were doing the activity. All items have been codedwith ICF-CY values using the Cieza et al. (2005) coding rules and will be analysed using factoranalysis and multi-variant methods to identify if a measure of the intensity of participation can bemade and whether this could be an additional qualifier within the ICF-CY framework.

    Cieza, A., et al. (2005). ICF linking rules: an update based on lessons learned. J. Rehab Med, 37,212-218.

  • 20.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Does thinking and doing the same thing amount to involved participation? Empirical explorations for finding a measure of intensity for a third ICF-CY qualifier2012Inngår i: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 274-283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation as involvement in a situation includes two dimensions; doing the activity and the experience of involvement.

    Objectives: The ICF-CY only measures doing using the capacity and performance qualifiers, a dimension measuring the experience is needed; a third qualifier. Hypothesis: The experienced involvement of pupils in school activities is higher when thinking and doing coincided.

    Methods: By comparing self-reported experiences of involvement of children, data about what children were thinking and doing during activities were gathered from 21 children with and 19 without disabilities in inclusive classrooms.

    Results: A relationship exists between an index of the subjective experience of involvement and whether children were thinking and doing the same things.

    Conclusion: This index can be constructed using measures of concentration, control, involvement, and motivation. Choice is influential, as knowledge about why an activity is undertaken affects involvement. Additionally, increased subjective experience of involvement gives better psychological health and well-being.

  • 21.
    Maxwell, Gregor R.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Inclusive and Special Education Section, Department of Education, UiT Norway's Arctic University, Tromsø, Norway.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Inclusion through participation: Understanding participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a methodological research tool for investigating inclusion2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, artikkel-id 41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the use and validity of the International Classification of Functioning disability and health (ICF) as a common language for describing inclusive educational settings. There is a specific focus on investigating participation through the ICF as one aspect of inclusion as an improved understanding of participation as a measure of inclusion will greatly benefit children with additional support needs. In addition there will be a better understanding of the operationalization of participation, in terms of both policy and practice, and improved applications of the ICF. The study uses a narrative summary to review to analyse the findings from a selection of studies where the ICF has been used as a methodological tool in the field of education. In the 16 included studies the ICF is either used to present a new theoretical position, synthesize a new research approach or tool, or is integrated into the framework of an existing research method. Findings also show that the ICF is used in a number of different ways and that when it is used directly, variation is found in the type of information that was linked to ICF codes or categories. In conclusion further clarity on defining and measuring participation with the ICF framework is required in order to create a more consistent tool for investigating inclusive education. One way to improve the construct of participation is to take a bi-dimensional approach. It is the authors’ belief that this newer approach to modelling participation will be considered in any future revisions of the ICF/ICF-CY – a so-called ‘ICF-2’. This would thus create a more accountable classification framework that succeeds in capturing the involvement experience of the individual and in doing so achieves a more effective and useful classification framework for the field of inclusive education.

  • 22.
    Ng, Kwok
    et al.
    Finland.
    Tynjälä, Jorma
    Finland.
    Sigmundová, Dagmar
    Czech republic.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO).
    Sentenac, Mariane
    Frankrike.
    Rintala, Pauli
    Finland.
    Inchley, Jo
    England.
    Physical activity among adolescents with long-term Illnesses or disabilities in 15 European countries2017Inngår i: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 34, nr 4, s. 456-465Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity (PA) is an important health-promoting behavior from which adolescents with long-term illnesses or disabilities (LTID) can benefit. It is important to monitor differences across countries in adherence with PA recommendations for health. The aim of this study was to compare PA levels among 15 European countries after disaggregating data by disability. Data from pupils (mean age = 13.6 years, SD = 1.64) participating in the 2013/2014 Health Behavior in School-aged Children study were analyzed to compare adolescents without LTID, with LTID, and with LTID that affects their participation (affected LTID). Logistic regression models adjusted for age and family affluence, stratified by gender and country group with PA recommendations for health as the outcome variable. With the data pooled, 15% (n = 9,372) of adolescents reported having LTID and 4% (n = 2,566) having affected LTID. Overall, fewer boys with LTID met PA recommendations for health than boys without LTID, although it was not statistically significant either at the national levels or for girls.

  • 23.
    Ng, Kwok W.
    et al.
    Health Research Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Inchley, Jo
    School of Medicine, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK.
    Comparisons in Screen-Time Behaviours among Adolescents with and without Long-Term Illnesses or Disabilities: Results from 2013/14 HBSC Study2018Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, nr 10, artikkel-id 2276Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing sedentary behaviours can help prevent non-communicable diseases, particularly among young adolescents with long term illnesses or disabilities (LTID). Much of young people’s voluntary sedentary time is related to screen-time behaviours (STBs) such as TV viewing, playing computer games, and using the computer for other activities. Although public health data on adolescents’ STB is growing, information about adolescents with LTID is currently lacking in a European context. The purpose of this study is to compare time on STBs between adolescents with and without LTID in European Countries through the HBSC 2013/14 study. Young adolescents (n = 61,329; boys 47.8%) from 15 European countries reported the time spent on TV viewing, playing computer games, and using the computer for other purposes on weekdays and the weekend. STBs were dichotomised based on international recommendations of less than 2 h per day, and Chi-square tests of independence were performed to investigate differences. STB time was combined to produce a sum score as dependent variable in multiple analysis of covariance with age and family affluence as covariates. There were statistically significant differences in computer gaming among boys and other computer use among girls for both weekdays and weekends, whereby adolescents with LTID reported higher use. In addition, both boys and girls with LTID spent more time on STBs than their same sex peers without LTID (Boys, F = 28.17, p< 0.001; Girls, F = 9.60, p = 0.002). The results of this study indicate a need for preventive strategies to address high levels of STB among young adolescents with LTID and reduce the risk of poor health outcomes associated with higher levels of sedentary behaviour.

  • 24.
    Ottová-Jordan, Veronika
    et al.
    Tyskland.
    Smith, Otto R. F.
    Norge.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Gobina, Inese
    Lettland.
    Rathmann, Katharina
    Tyskland.
    Torsheim, Torbjørn
    Norge.
    Mazur, Joanna
    Polen.
    Välimaa, Raili
    Finland.
    Cavallo, Franco
    Italien.
    Jericek Klanscek, Helena
    Slovenien.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Nederländerna.
    Meilstrup, Charlotte
    Danmark.
    Richter, Matthias
    Tyskland.
    Moor, Irene
    Tyskland.
    Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike
    Tyskland.
    Trends in health complaints from 2002 to 2010 in 34 countries and their association with health behaviours and social context factors at individual and macro-level2015Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, nr Suppl 2, s. 83-89Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This article describes trends and stability over time in health complaints in adolescents from 2002 to 2010 and investigates associations between health complaints, behavioural and social contextual factors at individual level and economic factors at macro-level.

    METHODS: Comprising N = 510 876 11-, 13- and 15-year-old children and adolescents in Europe, North America and Israel, data came from three survey cycles of the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Age- and gender-adjusted trends in health complaints were examined in each country by means of linear regression. By using the country as the random effects variable, we tested to what extent individual and contextual variables were associated with health complaints.

    RESULTS: Significant associations are stronger for individual level determinants (e.g. being bullied, smoking) than for determinants at macro-level (e.g. GDP, Gini), as can be seen by the small effect sizes (less than 5% for different trends). Health complaints are fairly stable over time in most countries, and no clear international trend in health complaints can be observed between 2002 and 2010. The most prominent stable determinants were being female, being bullied, school pressure and smoking.

    CONCLUSION: Factors associated with health complaints are more related to the proximal environment than to distal macro-level factors. This points towards intensifying targeted interventions, (e.g. for bullying) and also targeting specific risk groups. The comparably small effect size at country-level indicates that country-level factors have an impact on health and should not be ignored.

  • 25. Ottová-Jordan, Veronika
    et al.
    Smith, Otto R.F.
    Gobina, Inese
    Mazur, Joanna
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Cavallo, Franco
    Välimaa, Raili
    Moor, Irene
    Torsheim, Torbjörn
    Katreniakova, Zuzana
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike
    Trends in Multiple Recurrent health complaitns in 15-year-olds in 35 countries in Europe, North America and Israel from 1994 to 20102015Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, nr suppl 2, s. 24-27Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health complaints are a good indicator of an individual's psychosocial health and well-being. Studies have shown that children and adolescents report health complaints which can cause significant individual burden.

    METHODS: Using data from the international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, this article describes trends in multiple recurrent health complaints (MHC) in 35 countries among N = 237 136 fifteen-year-olds from 1994 to 2010. MHC was defined as the presence of two or more health complaints at least once a week. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate trends across the five survey cycles for each country.

    RESULTS: Lowest prevalence throughout the period 1994-2010 was 16.9% in 1998 in Austria and highest in 2006 in Israel (54.7%). Overall, six different trend patterns could be identified: No linear or quadratic trend (9 countries), linear decrease (7 countries), linear increase (5 countries), U-shape (4 countries), inverted U-shape (6 countries) and unstable (4 countries).

    CONCLUSION: Trend analyses are valuable in providing hints about developments in populations as well as for benchmarking and evaluation purposes. The high variation in health complaints between the countries requires further investigation, but may also reflect the subjective nature of health complaints.

  • 26.
    Plenty, Stephanie
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet, CHESS.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholms Universitet, CHESS.
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholms Universitet, CHESS.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd). Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Swedish National Institute of Public Health (FHI), SE-831 40 Östersund, Sweden.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholms Universitet, CHESS.
    Psychosocial working conditions: an analysis of emotional symptoms and conduct problems amongst adolecent students2014Inngår i: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 37, nr 4, s. 407-417Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how psychosocial features of the schoolwork environment are associated with students’ mental health. Data was drawn from 3699 ninth grade (15 year-old) Swedish students participating in the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. Using Structural Equation Modelling, perceived school demands, decision control and social support from teachers, classmates and parents were examined in relation to students’ emotional and conduct problems. Higher demands were associated with greater emotional symptoms and conduct problems. Although weaker social support predicted emotional symptoms and conduct problems, the relative influence of teachers, classmates and parents differed. Teacher support was more closely associated with conduct problems, particularly for girls, while classmate support was more strongly related to emotional symptoms. The findings indicate that while excessive school pressure is associated with poorer mental health, social support can assist in optimising adolescents’ emotional health and adaptive behaviour, as well as shaping perceptions of demands.

  • 27.
    Sonmark, Kristina
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Godeau, Emmanuelle
    Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Modin, Bitte
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Sociology, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Individual and contextual expressions of school demands and their relation to psychosomatic health a comparative study of students in France and Sweden2016Inngår i: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 93-109Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the health-related implications of both individual students’ and class-level concentrations of perceived demands in terms of pressuring, difficult and tiring schoolwork in France and Sweden, two countries with substantial differences in their educational systems and recent notable differences in PISA-results. Data come from Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (2001/02, 2005/06 and 2009/10) and comprise a total of 33,243 students aged 11, 13 and 15. Findings show that feeling under pressure from schoolwork is less prevalent in Sweden than in France among 11 and 13-year olds, but almost twice as common among 15-year olds. Yet its correlation with 15-year olds’ psychosomatic complaints is stronger in France than in Sweden. Feeling tired by schoolwork is equally common for 11- and 13-year olds in the two countries, but more frequent among 15-year olds in Sweden. It is also a stronger predictor of psychosomatic complaints in Sweden than in France across all age-groups. While it is more common at all ages to perceive the schoolwork as difficult in France, its relationship with psychosomatic complaints is stronger among students in Sweden. The proportion of classmates reporting high school demands is also linked to poorer student health, but these effects were largely confined to girls in both countries.

  • 28.
    Torsheim, Torbjørn
    et al.
    Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Swedish National Institute of Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Schnohr, Christina Warrer
    Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hansen, Fredrik
    Research Centre for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bjarnason, Thoroddur
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Akureyri, Akureyri, Iceland.
    Välimaa, Raili
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Screen-based activities and physical complaints among adolescents from the Nordic countries2010Inngår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, nr 324, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A positive association between time spent on sedentary screen-based activities and physical complaints has been reported, but the cumulative association between different types of screen-based activities and physical complaints has not been examined thoroughly.

    METHODS:

    The cross-sectional association between screen-based activity and physical complaints (backache and headache) among students was examined in a sample of 31022 adolescents from Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland and Greenland, as part of the Health behaviour in school-aged children 2005/06 (HBSC) study. Daily hours spent on screen-based activities and levels of physical complaints were assessed using self-reports.

    RESULTS:

    Logistic regression analysis indicated that computer use, computer gaming and TV viewing contributed uniquely to prediction of weekly backache and headache. The magnitude of associations was consistent across types of screen based activities, and across gender.

    CONCLUSION:

    The observed associations indicate that time spent on screen-based activity is a contributing factor to physical complaints among young people, and that effects accumulate across different types of screen-based activities.

1 - 28 of 28
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf