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  • 1.
    Aarts, Mariëlle P. J.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH. Forskningsområde Bebyggd miljö. Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Diakoumis, Adonia
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    van Hoof, Joost
    Fontys EGT—Centre for Healthcare and Technology, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Shedding a light on phototherapy studies with people having dementia: A critical review of the methodology from a light perspective2016Inngår i: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 31, nr 7, s. 551-563Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Light therapy is applied to older people with dementia as a treatment to reset the biological clock, to improve the cognitive functioning, and to reduce behavioral symptoms. Although the methodological quality of light therapy studies is essential, many aspects concerning the description of the lighting applied are missing. This study reviewed light therapy studies concerning the effects on people with dementia as a way to check the methodological quality of the description of light from a light engineering perspective. Twelve studies meeting the inclusion criteria were chosen for further analysis. Each study was scored on a list of aspects relevant to a proper description of lighting aspects. The overview demonstrates that the overall quality of the methodologies is poor. The studies describe the lighting insufficiently and not in the correct metrics. The robustness of light therapy studies can be improved by involving a light engineer or specialist.

  • 2.
    Aarts, Mariëlle P. J.
    et al.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Straathof, Jochem
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Hoof, Joost
    Centre for Healthcare and Technology, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Dynamic lighting systems in psychogeriatric care facilities in the Netherlands: A quantitative and qualitative analysis of stakeholders’ responses and applied technology2015Inngår i: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 24, nr 5, s. 617-630Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term care facilities are currently installing dynamic lighting systems with the aim to improve the well-being and behaviour of residents with dementia. The aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of dynamic lighting systems from the perspective of stakeholders and the performance of the technology. Therefore, a questionnaire survey was conducted with the management and care professionals of six care facilities. Moreover, light measurements were conducted in order to describe the exposure of residents to lighting. The results showed that the main reason for purchasing dynamic lighting systems lied in the assumption that the well-being and day/night rhythmicity of residents could be improved. The majority of care professionals were not aware of the reasons why dynamic lighting systems were installed. Despite positive subjective ratings of the dynamic lighting systems, no data were collected by the organizations to evaluate the effectiveness of the lighting. Although the care professionals stated that they did not see any large positive effects of the dynamic lighting systems on the residents and their own work situation, the majority appreciated the dynamic lighting systems more than the old situation. The light values measured in the care facilities did not exceed the minimum threshold values reported in the literature. Therefore, it seems illogical that the dynamic lighting systems installed in the researched care facilities will have any positive health effects.

  • 3.
    Aarts, Mariëlle P.J.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    van Duijnhoven, Juliëtte
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam B. C.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander L.P.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Performance of personally worn dosimeters to study non-image forming effects of light: Assessment methods2017Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 117, s. 60-72Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When determining the effects of light on human beings, it is essential to correctly measure the effects, and to correctly measure the adequate properties of light. Therefore, it is important to know what is being measured and know the quality of the measurement devices. This paper describes simple methods for identifying three quality indices; the directional response index, the linearity index and the temperature index. These indices are also checked for several commonly used portable light measurement devices. The results stresses what was already assumed, the quality and the outcome of these devices under different circumstances were very different. Also, the location were these devices are normally worn has an impact on the results. The deviation range between worn vertically at eye level and the wrist is between 11% (outdoor) to 27% (indoor). The smallest deviation, both in indoor and outdoor, was found when the device was placed on the sides of the eye (7%). 

  • 4.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Petersson, Mikael
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    A holistic approach for a natural light variation experience: a pilot study of a practical application for office lighting2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting is crucial for vision and has important effects beyond vision, influencing a variety of physiological and behavioral processes. When designing lighting, visual aspects, effects beyond vision, and perception of the environment should be considered together in a holistic approach. As humans evolved under daylight, a lighting protocol, based on a room context and daylight characteristics, was developed and described. The lighting, with customized light levels, spectral composition and light distribution that changed dynamically to evoke a perception of daylight conditions, was realized using commercially available luminaires and a digital control system. The resulting lighting conditions are described by measurements.

  • 5.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aarts, Mariëlle
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Hoof, Joost
    Centre for Healthcare and Technology, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Daylight and health: A review of the evidence and consequences for the built environment2015Inngår i: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 47, nr 1, s. 16-27Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Daylight has been associated with multiple health advantages. Some of these claims are associations, hypotheses or beliefs. This review presents an overview of a scientific literature search on the proven effects of daylight exposure on human health. Studies were identified with a search strategy across two main databases. Additionally, a search was performed based on specific health effects. The results are diverse and either physiological or psychological. A rather limited statistically significant and well-documented scientific proof for the association between daylight and its potential health consequences was found. However, the search based on specific health terms made it possible to create a first subdivision of associations with daylight, leading to the first practical implementations for building design.

  • 6.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Beute, F.
    LightGreen Wellbeing, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Fischl, Géza
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Students in good mood appear slower and less accurate: A pilot study investigating dynamic lighting impact on students’ perception and performance2019Inngår i: Proceedings of the 29th Session of the CIE: Washington D.C., USA, June 14 – 22, 2019, Volume 1 – Part 2, Vienna: The International Commission on Illumination, 2019, Vol. 1, s. 1297-1304Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic daylight can provide stimulation throughout the day. Since not all building spaces have access to enough daylight, electric lighting solutions can help substituting. The study investigated the effect of two opposite, daily dynamic light patterns to influence students’ mood and performance. In a mimicked open office space, 20 second-year students participated in a pilot study where they were exposed to light patterns changing in illuminance level over a day and filled out momentary assessments five times. Hierarchical Linear Models were employed to analyse the effect of light level as well as the timing of the exposure. Positive effects are shown for mood, but only for the pattern with a high morning light level. An afternoon boost may come too late to exert benefits. There are indications for performance-enhancing effects by use of dynamic light conditions, even though students seem to be slower and less accurate when in good mood.

  • 7.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Building Physics and Systems, Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, Delft, Netherlands.
    Bluyssen, P. M.
    Building Physics and Systems, Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, Delft, Netherlands.
    Climate change consequences for the indoor environment2009Inngår i: Heron, ISSN 0046-7316, E-ISSN 1574-4078, Vol. 54, nr 1, s. 49-70Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists warn us about climate change and its effects on the outdoor environment. These effects can have significant consequences for the indoor environment, also in the Netherlands. Climate changes will affect different aspects of the indoor environment as well as the stakeholders of that indoor environment. Buildings will require less heating in the winter and more cooling in the summer, resulting in an increase use of air conditioning systems. Increasing relative humidity indoors and rising moisture from the ground will cause significantly more mould problems resulting in further health risks. Additionally, effects on lighting and acoustical quality, but also several psycho-social effects seem likely to occur. It is concluded that possible adaptations, whether performed at the source of climate change effects, the building or by involving people, can only be executed properly when the possible effects of climate changes on occupant wishes and needs as well as the interactions of these occupants with their environment are well understood.

  • 8.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    Boele, L. C. L.
    TNO Defense, Security and Safety, Rijswijk, Netherlands.
    Tuinman, I. L.
    TNO Defense, Security and Safety, Rijswijk, Netherlands.
    V D Bergh, I.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    Moons, A. M. M.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    De Jong, P.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    Kooter, I. M.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    Particulate matter and the health effects on human living lung cells2009Inngår i: 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Predominant sources of personal particulate matter exposure are residential indoor and road-traffic or soil-borne outdoor respirable particles. Candles are an important source of indoor particulate matter. Therefore a pilot study was conducted in a specially built research facility for a fixed period of time. Fine and ultrafine particle concentrations were continuously sampled and the likelihood for potential health effects was studied using the CULTEX® system in which human lung cells were directly exposed to air samples. A high concentration of ultrafine particles was registered during the candle burning; a control condition recorded a much lower concentration and larger particle diameters. First results indicate that unhealthy situations due to candle burning in the indoor environment are very well possible.

  • 9.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada.
    Newsham, Guy R.
    Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada.
    Effect of daylight saving time on lighting energy use: A literature review2008Inngår i: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 36, nr 6, s. 1858-1866Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The principal reason for introducing (and extending) daylight saving time (DST) was, and still is, projected energy savings, particularly for electric lighting. This paper presents a literature review concerning the effects of DST on energy use. Simple estimates suggest a reduction in national electricity use of around 0.5%, as a result of residential lighting reduction. Several studies have demonstrated effects of this size based on more complex simulations or on measured data. However, there are just as many studies that suggest no effect, and some studies suggest overall energy penalties, particularly if gasoline consumption is accounted for. There is general consensus that DST does contribute to an evening reduction in peak demand for electricity, though this may be offset by an increase in the morning. Nevertheless, the basic patterns of energy use, and the energy efficiency of buildings and equipment have changed since many of these studies were conducted. Therefore, we recommend that future energy policy decisions regarding changes to DST be preceded by high-quality research based on detailed analysis of prevailing energy use, and behaviours and systems that affect energy use. This would be timely, given the extension to DST underway in North America in 2007.

  • 10.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department Built Environment.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department Built Environment.
    Westerhout, Wies
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department Built Environment.
    Hordijk, Truus
    Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment.
    Visser, Rienk
    Rienk Visser Lichtontwerp en - Advies.
    Pacey, Betty Lou
    BL Innovative Lighting - Vancouver.
    Energy efficient facade lighting: highlighting facade structure2014Inngår i: Spool, ISSN 2215-0900, Vol. 1, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The project set out to proof that a conventional optical fibre lighting system for highlighting the structure of a façade can be operated more energy-efficiently through the substitution of the projector using a metal halide reflector lamp by a laser. This is investigated by looking into the photometric assessment of such systems as well as the electric power draw during operation. In preparation for a potential exterior demonstration installation, an additional focal point of the research was the design and testing of a weatherproof case that provides protection to the laser and the ballast. The final stage brought the different aspects of the research together and resulted in a temporary experimental setup (pilot installation) in order to showcase the validity of this novel approach.

  • 11.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Veitch, Jennifer A.
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Newsham, Guy R.
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Windows, view, and office characteristics predict physical and psychological discomfort2010Inngår i: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 30, nr 4, s. 533-541Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Office employees spend a lot of time inside buildings, where the physical conditions influence their well-being and indirectly influence their employers' business performance. With data from a field study conducted in the Netherlands in April to May 2003, we used path analysis to further elucidate the relationship between personal (gender and seasonality of mood shifts), building (view type, view quality, window distance, and social density), and perceived environmental conditions (light quality, and office impression) and physical and psychological discomfort, sleep quality, and environmental utility. The results show that window views, which that are rated as being more attractive, are beneficial to building occupants by reducing discomfort. However, being close to a window and rating the lighting as being of lower quality can result in thermal and glare problems (environmental utility). Reduced discomfort at work can improve sleep quality, indicating that physical conditions at work influence home life.

  • 12.
    Bluyssen, Philomena M.
    et al.
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft, Netherlands.
    van Dommelen, Paula
    TNO Quality of life, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Comfort of workers in office buildings: The European HOPE project2011Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 46, nr 1, s. 280-288Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that building, social and personal factors can influence one's perceived health and comfort. The aim of the underlying study was to get a better understanding of the relationships between these factors and perceived comfort. Self-administered questionnaires from 5732 respondents in 59 office buildings and building-specific data from the European Health Optimisation Protocol for Energy-efficient buildings (HOPE) study were used. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), reliability analyses, and linear regression analysis were performed. The outcome showed that perceived comfort is strongly influenced by several personal, social and building factors and that their relationships are complex. Results showed that perceived comfort is much more than the average of perceived indoor air quality, noise, lighting and thermal comfort responses. Perceived comfort is a phenomenon that deserves more research.

  • 13.
    Chraibi, S.
    et al.
    Philips Lighting B.V., Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Creemers, P.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Rosenkötter, C.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    van Loenen, E. J.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Rosemann, A. L. P.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Dimming strategies for open office lighting: User experience and acceptance2019Inngår i: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 51, nr 4, s. 513-529Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor-triggered control strategies can limit the energy consumption of lighting by considering the presence of users in the office and dimming lighting down when it is not needed. In multi-user offices, the application of occupancy-based dimming at room level limits the energy saving potential. However, zone- or desk-based dimming may affect the comfort of co-workers due to its dynamics. This paper reports the assessment by 17 participants (30–50 years of age) of occupancy-based dimming in a mock-up office, using different dimming speeds. Participants consisted of co-workers experiencing changes triggered by others, and actors triggering these light changes. While the participants performed an office-based task, the luminaire above the actors’ desk was dimmed from approximately 550 lx to 350 lx (average horizontal illuminance), and vice versa. The participants evaluated the dimming conditions regarding their noticeability and acceptability. The study showed that the noticeability of light changes due to dimming, increases when fading times become shorter. Dimming with a fading time of at least two seconds was experienced as acceptable by more than 70% of the participants. The results of this experiment provide insights to system behaviour that does not compromise user experience while addressing energy efficient use of electric lighting.

  • 14.
    Chraibi, Sanae
    et al.
    Philips Group Innovation, Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Lashina, Tatiana
    Philips Group Innovation, Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Shrubsole, Paul
    Philips Group Innovation, Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    van Loenen, Evert
    Philips Group Innovation, Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Satisfying light conditions: a field study on perception of consensus light in Dutch open office environments2016Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 105, s. 116-127Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace innovation has been changing the European office landscape into mostly open spaces, where enhanced interaction between people is combined by efficient use of space. However, challenges are found in offering individual preferred conditions in these multi-user spaces, especially when dealing with shared systems.

    Previous studies clearly show the benefits of personal control as a means to achieve individual preferred lighting. Most of these benefits were demonstrated in private offices or situations where users have a “personal” light source.

    Lighting systems in open offices are often designed as a regular grid of luminaires to deliver uniform lighting. This often results in a luminaire grid that does not match the desk arrangement, making it challenging to offer personal lighting controls. By grouping luminaires, users could be offered consensus control. The question is whether consensus control brings advantages rather than disadvantages.

    This paper presents the results of a field study evaluating consensus light control in an open office 14 users experienced a reference no-control condition and a condition with control over a zone of luminaires. Data was collected by objective measurements as well as subjective surveys and interviews.

    This study shows that consensus control in an open office improves satisfaction of individual users with the light quantity and quality. Even though the controllable light is shared, consensus among users results in an improved lighting environment for the majority of users. Selected illuminances in the condition with controls were on average lower than in the reference condition, resulting in lower energy usage by lighting.

  • 15.
    Davoodi, Anahita
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Johansson, Peter
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    The use of lighting simulation in the evidence-based design process: A case study approach using visual comfort analysis in offices2019Inngår i: Building Simulation, ISSN 1996-3599, E-ISSN 1996-8744Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The EBD-SIM (evidence-based design, simulation) framework is a conceptual framework developed to integrate the use of lighting simulation in the EBD process to provide a holistic performance evaluation method. A real-time case study, executed in a fully operational office building, is used to demonstrate the framework’s performance. The case study focused on visual comfort analysis. The objective is to demonstrate the applicability of the developed EBD-SIM framework using correlations between current visual comfort metrics and actual human perception as evaluation criteria. The data were collected via simulation for visual comfort analysis and via questionnaires for instantaneous and annual visual comfort perception. The study showed that for user perception, the most crucial factor for visual comfort is the amount of light on a task area, and simple metrics such as Eh-room and Eh-task had a higher correlation with perceived visual comfort than complex performance metrics such as Daylight Autonomy (DA). To improve the design process, the study suggests that, among other things, post-occupancy evaluations (POEs) should be conducted more frequently to obtain better insight into user perception of daylight and subsequently use new evidence to further improve the design of the EBD-SIM model.

  • 16.
    Davoodi, Anahita
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Johansson, Peter
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Henricson, Maria
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ADULT.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    A Conceptual Framework for Integration of Evidence-Based Design with Lighting Simulation Tools2017Inngår i: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 7, nr 4, artikkel-id 82Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of lighting simulation tools has been growing over the past years which has improved lighting analysis. While computer simulations have proven to be a viable tool for analyzing lighting in physical environments, they have difficulty in assessing the effects of light on occupant’s perception. Evidence-based design (EBD) is a design method that is gaining traction in building design due to its strength in providing means to assess the effects of built environments on humans. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for integrating EBD with lighting simulation tools. Based on a literature review, it was investigated how EBD and lighting simulation can be combined to provide a holistic lighting performance evaluation method. The results show that they can mutually benefit from each other. EBD makes it possible to evaluate and/or improve performance metrics by utilizing user feedback. On the other hand, performance metrics can be used for a better description of evidence, and to analyze the effects of lighting with more details. The results also show that EBD can be used to evaluate light simulations to better understand when and how they should be performed. A framework is presented for integration of lighting simulation and EBD

  • 17.
    Davoodi, Anahita
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Johansson, Peter
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Environmental Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Current use of lighting simulation tools in Sweden2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the findings of a web-based survey on the current use of lighting simulation tools in Sweden. The objective was to understand which lighting simulation tools are currently used in Sweden and to understand the design practitioners’ needs for future software development. The results showed that lighting simulation programs are widely used in Sweden. However, the respondents paid less attention to daylight than to artificial light. The respondents’ principal training methods were university courses and self-study. Interior illuminance values, glare indexes, and the daylight factor were the most commonly calculated simulation outputs. “Ease of use” and “accuracy” were identified as the most important factors in the use of the software, while “slowness of simulations process” causes the most dissatisfaction. Dialux was the most popular software program used.

  • 18.
    de Bakker, Christel
    et al.
    Eindhoven Univeristy of Technology.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Kort, Helianthe
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Occupancy-based lighting control in open-plan office spaces: A state-of-the-art review2017Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 112, s. 308-321Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting accounts for a significant amount of electrical energy consumption in office buildings, up to 45% of the total consumed. This energy consumption can be reduced by as much as 60% through an occupant-dependent lighting control strategy. With particular focus on open-plan offices, where the application of this strategy is more challenging to apply due to differences in individual occupancy patterns, this paper covers (1) to which extent individual occupancy-based lighting control has been tested, (2) developed, and (3) evaluated. Search terms were defined with use of three categories, namely ‘occupancy patterns’, ‘lighting control strategy’, and ‘office’. Relevant articles were selected by a structured search through key online scientific databases and journals. The 24 studies identified as eligible were evaluated on six criteria: (1) study characteristics, (2) office characteristics, (3) lighting system characteristics, (4) lighting control design, (5) post-occupancy evaluation, and (6) conclusions, and this was used to answer the research questions. It was concluded that the strategy has not been tested yet with field studies in open-plan offices, but that it needs further development before it can be applied in these type of offices. Although lighting currently tends to be controlled at workspace level, many aspects of the strategy can be further developed; there is potential to further increase energy savings on lighting within open-plan office spaces. Individual occupancy-based lighting control requires further validation, focussing on the factors influencing its energy savings, on its cost effectiveness, and on its acceptability for users.

  • 19.
    Khademagha, P.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Rosemann, A.L.P.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    van Loenen, E. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Implementing non-image-forming effects of light in the built environment: A review on what we need2016Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 108, s. 263-272Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for incorporating the non-image-forming effects of light into daylighting design in the built environment. The framework includes human performance indicators to measure the magnitude of the non-image-forming effects of light as well as light factors to quantify these effects. In addition, architectural (daylighting) design parameters are included to control the magnitude of the light factors reaching indoor environment. To assess the magnitude of the non-image-forming effects of light in daylighting design process, threshold values for every light factor are discussed. A distinction is made between luminous and temporal characteristics of every light factor and the application of their thresholds in daylighting design process. The proposed framework enables stakeholders in the field of daylighting to incorporate the non-image-forming light requirements in design and to evaluate the potential of indoor spaces with regard to these requirements.

  • 20.
    Khademagha, Parisa
    et al.
    Built environment, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Building Lighting Group, Department of the Built Environment, and Intelligent Lighting Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander L. P.
    Built environment, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Loenen, Evert J. van
    Philips Research, Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands.
    A multidirectional spectral measurement method and instrument to investigate non-image-forming effects of light2018Inngår i: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 29, nr 8, artikkel-id 085902Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Light directionality, spectrum, and relevant radiometric or photometric quantity are believed essential factors influencing the magnitude of non-image-forming effects. In this paper, a measurement method and an instrument (the multidirectional spectroradiometer - MuS) is proposed, which considers different light incidents and spectra simultaneously, therefore, enables measurement of light characteristics relevant for non-image-forming effects. The MuS consists of four spectroradiometers measuring in different directions. Four spectrometers using optical fibers were configured to measure the spectral irradiance within a wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm with ~5.7 nm pixel resolution. Application of the MuS facilitates a better understanding of the non-image-forming light characteristics of spaces. The MuS is tested with stable electric lighting and with dynamic daylight conditions and is proven reliable to perform continuous spectral measurements in different directions simultaneously. Results show a substantial difference in measured radiation magnitude and spectral distribution in different directions, which suggests varying impact on non-image-forming effects.

  • 21.
    Khademagha, Parisa
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    van Loenen, Evert
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands, Philips Research, The Netherlands.
    New method for analyzing a luminous environment considering non-image-forming effects of light2017Inngår i: Design to Thrive: Proceedings 2017, volume II, PLEA 2017 Proceedings / [ed] Luisa Brotas, Susan Roaf & Fergus Nicol, Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings (NCEUB) , 2017, s. 3245-3252Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 22.
    Khademagha, Parisa
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH. Forskningsområde Bebyggd miljö. Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Van Loenen, Evert
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Why Directionality Is an Important Light Factor for Human Health to Consider in Lighting Design?2016Inngår i: International Journal of Sustainable Lighting, ISSN 2586-1247, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 3-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Both image-forming and non-image-forming effects of radiation require proper attention in lighting design that aims at meeting human vision and health requirements. Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells (ipRGCs) appear to play an essential role in stimulation of the non-image forming effects and thus human health and well-being. There are indications that radiation incident contributes to the magnitude of these effects. This review summarizes current studies on humans and animals related to radiation directionality as well as the spatial distribution of ipRGCs on the retina. New insights can facilitate and optimize the incorporation of radiation directionality in building lighting design.

  • 23.
    Kruisselbrink, Thijs
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    A Practical Device for Measuring the Luminance Distribution2017Inngår i: International Journal of Sustainable Lighting, ISSN 2586-1247, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 75-90Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Various applications in building lighting such as automated daylight systems, dynamic lighting control systems, lighting simulations, and glare analyzes can be optimized using information on the actual luminance distributionsof the surroundings. Currently, commercially available luminance distribution measurement devices are often not suitable for these kind of applications or simply too expensive for broad application. This paper describes the development of a practical and autonomous luminance distribution measurement device based on a credit card-sized single-board computer and a camera system. The luminance distribution was determined by capturing High Dynamic Range images and translating the RGB information to the CIE XYZ color space. The High Dynamic Range technology was essential to accurately capture the data needed to calculate the luminance distribution because it allows to capture luminance ranges occurring in real scenarios. The measurement results were represented in accordance with established methods in the field of daylighting. Measurements showed that the accuracy of the luminance distribution measurement device ranged from 5% to 20% (worst case) which was deemed acceptable for practical measurements and broad applications in the building realm.

  • 24.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, M. B. C.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Van Loenen, E. J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J. L. M.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Analysis of various opening configurations of a second-generation virtual natural lighting solutions prototype2014Inngår i: LEUKOS The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, ISSN 1550-2724, E-ISSN 1550-2716, Vol. 10, nr 4, s. 223-236Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the absence of natural light in working spaces, virtual natural lighting solutions (VNLS) can be promising. VNLS are systems that artificially provide lighting as well as a realistic outside view with properties comparable to those of real windows and skylights. This article discusses the evaluation and analysis of various opening configurations of a second-generation VNLS prototype, which features an array of light emitting diode (LED) tiles coupled with a line of linear LED fixtures with adjustable color temperatures that provide direct light. Simulation using Radiance was performed and validated with the measurement results. Various possibilities of placing the prototypes inside the test room were investigated in Radiance to determine the effect on space availability and visual comfort. Based on the comparison of seven configurations of two prototypes with equal total opening size, it was found that nearly all configurations tested yielded a space availability of 100% with a criterion of 200 lx and where space availability is defined as the percentage of points on a horizontal grid that meet or exceed the target illuminance. Taking 300 lx as the criterion, two openings on each short wall facing each other (configuration 2) and four openings on a long wall (configuration 5) yielded space availabilities of more than 90%. Taking 500 lx as the criterion, configurations 2 and 5 yielded space availabilities between 25% and 50%. The highest uniformity (Emin/Eavg) was achieved under configuration 2 (0.59), whereas the maximum daylight glare probability (DGP) values under all configurations were between 0.25 and 0.30. Our simulation results suggest that the space availability in a private office can be optimized by placing a VNLS prototype on each short wall facing each other or by placing two on a long wall.

  • 25.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Loenen, E. V.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Simulation of virtual natural lighting solutions with a simplified view2014Inngår i: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 46, nr 2, s. 198-218Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Daylight is limited in time and space. In situations where daylight is insufficiently available, virtual natural lighting solutions (VNLS), which are systems that artificially provide lighting and view comparable to those of real windows and skylights, can be promising. VNLS can turn currently unused floor space into space with daylight qualities. The space-gaining potential of VNLS in buildings can be predicted using computational building performance simulation. This paper describes the approach of modelling VNLS with a simplified view, using the Radiance tool to evaluate the lighting performance in a reference office. The VNLS are modelled as arrays of small light sources resembling the sky, the horizon and the ground. The simulation results show that VNLS with wide beam angles generally offer a better uniformity and a larger percentage of sufficiently lit workplane area compared to those obtained with real windows under overcast sky conditions, while the discomfort glare remains comparable to that received from real windows.

  • 26.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Department of Built Environment, Unit Building Physics and Services, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Department of Built Environment, Unit Building Physics and Services, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Van Loenen, E. J.
    Department of Built Environment, Unit Building Physics and Services, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J. L. M.
    Department of Built Environment, Unit Building Physics and Services, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Development of virtual natural lighting solutions with a simplified view using lighting simulation2013Inngår i: Proceedings of BS 2013: 13th Conference of the International Building Performance Simulation Association, 2013, s. 3384-3391Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Computational building performance simulation can be employed to develop various future solutions. The development of Virtual Natural Lighting Solutions (VNLS), which are systems that artificially provide natural lighting and view comparable to those of real windows and skylights, is steered by modelling them as arrays of small light sources resembling a simplified view of a blue sky and green ground. The lighting simulation tool Radiance is employed to predict the space availability, uniformity, ground light contribution on the ceiling, and probability of discomfort glare. The input variables are "distance between windows", "tilt angles", "beam angles", and "total luminous fluxes of the sky elements". Sensitivity analysis shows that the total luminous flux positively influences the space availability, the beam angle positively influences the uniformity; and negatively influences average ground light contribution on the ceiling and average probability of discomfort glare. Most of the VNLS models with 114° beam angle perform better on the tested performance indicators than real windows under CIE overcast sky.

  • 27.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Ochoa, C. E.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Van Loenen, E. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J. L. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Review of modelling approaches for developing virtual natural lighting solutions2011Inngår i: Proceedings of Building Simulation 2011: 12th Conference of International Building Performance Simulation Association, 2011, s. 2643-2650Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown that natural light is preferred over electrical lighting in built environments. It has positive effects on user satisfaction, health, and energy saving. However, natural light is limited by time and space. A possible solution is to apply the new concept of virtual natural lighting solutions that ideally can artificially provide natural lighting and views, with all of their properties. Computational modelling has the potential to steer the innovation process and early feasibility testing of this solution. Several available modelling approaches are reviewed, examining their ability to predict performance indicators of the system, in terms of lighting, view, space availability, thermal comfort, and energy consumption.

  • 28.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Wang, S.
    Sustainable Energy Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Loenen, E. J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J. L. M.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Comparison between lighting performance of a virtual natural lighting solutions prototype and a real window based on computer simulation2014Inngår i: Frontiers of Architectural Research, ISSN 2095-2635, E-ISSN 2095-2643, Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 398-412Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the measurement and simulation of a first generation prototype of Virtual Natural Lighting Solutions (VNLS), which are systems that can artificially provide natural lighting as well as a realistic outside view, with properties comparable to those of real windows and skylights. Examples of employing Radiance as a simulation tool to predict the lighting performance of such solutions are shown, for a particular case study of a VNLS prototype displaying variations of a simplified view of overcast, clear, and partly cloudy skies. Measurement and simulation were conducted to evaluate the illuminance distribution on workplane level. The key point of this study is to show that simulations can be used to compare an actual VNLS prototype with a hypothetical real window under the same sky scenes, which was physically not possible, since the test room was not located at the building[U+05F3]s façade. It is found that the investigated prototype yields a less rapidly drop illuminance distribution and a larger average illuminance than the corresponding real window, under the overcast (52 lx compared to 28 lx) and partly cloudy (102 lx compared to 80 lx) sky scenes. Under the clear sky scene, the real window yields a larger average illuminance (97 lx) compared to the prototype (71 lx), due to the influence of direct sunlight. © 2014 Higher Education Press Limited Company.

  • 29.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Wang, S.
    Sustainable Energy Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Meerbeek, B. W.
    Philips Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Loenen, E. J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Lighting performance and electrical energy consumption of a virtual window prototype2014Inngår i: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 135, s. 261-273Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the design and evaluation of a virtual window prototype, built using arrays of LED tiles to simulate the light as well as the view of a window. Arrays of white light LED fixtures with adjustable colour temperatures were incorporated to provide direct light into the test room. Lighting performance was evaluated by measuring horizontal illuminance on the workplane, vertical illuminance on the observer's eye plane, and luminance perceived by the observer at four vertical points. For estimating the electrical energy consumption, real-time power consumption of the entire system was measured, and three daily usage profile scenarios and two annual modes were considered. In addition, five locations were chosen to represent various climate types. The results show that under the maximum setting, the average workplane illuminance was 239. lx for the test room used, whereas discomfort glare at the observer's positions was classified as imperceptible. Patches of direct light on the side walls could be created as an intended effect from installing the direct light source arrays. Variation of average annual space availability within a given location as a function of usage profile is found to be very small; the values are however sensitive to the chosen criterion of workplane illuminance. Based on the designated daily usage profiles and annual modes, the normalised, total annual electrical energy consumption in all climate types is on average within the range of 0.63-0.79, relative to the total electrical energy consumed by the prototype when it constantly displays the maximum intensity setting.

  • 30.
    Mangkuto, Rizki A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Loenen, Evert J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, Jan L. M.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Modelling and simulation of virtual natural lighting solutions with complex views2014Inngår i: Building Simulation, ISSN 1996-3599, E-ISSN 1996-8744, Vol. 7, nr 6, s. 563-578Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In situations where daylight is insufficiently available, Virtual Natural Lighting Solutions (VNLS) can be promising to turn currently unused floor space into spaces with enough daylight qualities. This article introduces VNLS models with complex image scenes pasted on a transparent glass surface in front of arrays of small, directional white light sources. The objectives are twofold: the first one is to understand the effect of changing input variables, i.e. beam angle, total luminous flux of the "sky" elements, and image scene itself, on the lighting performance of a reference office space. The second objective is to compare two techniques of modelling the view, i.e. transmissive and emissive approaches, using Radiance. Sensitivity analysis of the simulation results show that under every image scene, the total luminous flux of the "sky" element is largely influential to the space availability, whereas the beam angle of the "sky" element is largely influential to the other output variables, including discomfort glare. The findings lead to a suggestion of preferred elements in the image scene, to ensure large space availability and uniformity. The transmissive approach generally generates smaller values of space availability, and largely depends on the view elements of the image scene. In turn, the average probability of discomfort glare using the transmissive approach is smaller than that using the emissive approach.

  • 31.
    Newsham, Guy
    et al.
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Brand, Jay
    Haworth, Inc., United States.
    Donnelly, Cara
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Canada.
    Veitch, Jennifer
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Aries, Myriam
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Canada.
    Charles, Kate
    National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Canada.
    Linking indoor environment conditions to job satisfaction: A field study2009Inngår i: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 37, nr 2, s. 129-147Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical and questionnaire data were collected from 95 workstations at an open-plan office building in Michigan, US. The physical measurements encompassed thermal, lighting, and acoustic variables, furniture dimensions, and an assessment of potential exterior view. Occupants answered a detailed questionnaire concerning their environmental and job satisfaction, and aspects of well-being. These data were used to test, via mediated regression, a model linking the physical environment, through environmental satisfaction, to job satisfaction and other related measures. In particular, a significant link was demonstrated between overall environmental satisfaction and job satisfaction, mediated by satisfaction with management and with compensation. Analysis of physical data was limited to the lighting domain. Results confirmed the important role of window access at the desk in satisfaction with lighting, particularly through its effect on satisfaction with outside view.

  • 32.
    Newsham, Guy R.
    et al.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Aries, Myriam
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Mancini, S.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Faye, G.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Individual control of electric lighting in a daylit space2008Inngår i: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 25-41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Participants (N=40) occupied a glare-free, daylit office laboratory for 1 day, and were prompted every 30 min to use dimming control over electric lighting to choose their preferred light level. Illuminances and luminances were recorded before and after each control opportunity; luminance maps were generated using a calibrated, high-dynamic range digital camera. Although there was a wide variation in chosen light levels between individuals, results showed a significant negative correlation between prevailing desktop illuminance and change in dimmer setting. This indicates that, from the perspective of occupants, daylight does displace electric lighting. Surprisingly, we did not find any luminance-based measure that was as good a predictor of participant dimmer choice as illuminance measured on the desktop. On average, manual dimming control in this situation reduced energy use for lighting by 25% compared to a fixed system delivering 500lx of electric lighting on the desktop.

  • 33.
    Ochoa, Carlos E.
    et al.
    Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J. L. M.
    Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    State of the art in lighting simulation for building science: A literature review2012Inngår i: Journal of Building Performance Simulation, Taylor & Francis, ISSN 1940-1493, E-ISSN 1940-1507, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 209-233Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the current state of the art in lighting simulation related to building science research. Discussion on historical developments and main modelling approaches is followed by describing lighting simulation within the design process, where it is applied beyond presentation renderings. Works are grouped using the main aspects of a program (input, modelling and output). Lighting simulation currently focuses on representing accurately a large number of common situations encountered by building designers and researchers. Existing models apply roughly the same theoretical algorithms and calculation aids, limiting representation of certain physical phenomena. Although some models can be used for element design, they are not practical enough to develop or prototype new, untested elements. Elaborate building components require separate analysis through complex simulation aids. Few tools support the early architectural design process. Simplification applies when integrating lighting simulation to wholebuilding simulation. Input quality affects accuracy, while output needs careful expert interpretation.

  • 34.
    Ochoa, Carlos E.
    et al.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Loenen, Evert J.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, Jan L. M.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Considerations on design optimization criteria for windows providing low energy consumption and high visual comfort2012Inngår i: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 95, s. 238-245Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Apparent window size contradictions arise when optimizing simultaneously for low energy (small sizes) and visual comfort (large sizes). Diverse multi-objective optimization methods exist, but basic questions must be solved beforehand such as choosing appropriate evaluation measures. This work aims to determine the suitability of combined optimization criteria on window sizing procedures for low energy consumption with high visual comfort and performance.The paper showcases diverse measures available to valorise energy consumption and visual aspects. A series of energy and visual criteria were selected, defining acceptance thresholds for dynamic evaluations. Whole-building computer simulations were performed on a standardized office located in a temperate climate. Discrete window-to-wall ratio variations were studied to demonstrate how these criteria affect the solution space.Results were classified using a graphical optimization method, obtaining a solution space satisfying both energy and visual requirements. Most project expectations can be met within the range of sizes. However, unprotected windows barely meet acceptance criteria, needing additional control devices. Applying various related criteria with adequate values increases the diversity of acceptable solutions but too many limits it. Clear objectives and acceptance ranges have to be conceptualized in order to translate them into decisions. This becomes important when involving team design.

  • 35.
    Soheilian, Moe
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Hafezparast Moadab, N.
    Fischl, Géza
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap.
    Comparison of simulated energy consumption by smart and conventional lighting systems in a residential setting2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigated and compared how the energy consumption of a conventional and Smart Lighting System (SLS) in a simulated residential setting is affected by different households’ arrangements and occupancy pattern. An agent-based simulation model of a one-bedroom apartment in Sweden was chosen for comparison with different scenarios. The result shows that the number of residents within an apartment does not necessarily lead to higher energy consumption. Further findings indicate that, even though it has standby energy consumption, SLS is more energy efficient compared to the conventional lighting system. Additionally, energy consumption during weekends was considerably higher than during weekdays.

  • 36.
    Van Duijnhoven, J.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Aarts, M.P.J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Rosemann, A.L.P.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Kort, H.S.M.
    University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands and Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Systematic review on the interaction between office light conditions and occupational health: Elucidating gaps and methodological issues2019Inngår i: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 28, nr 2, s. 152-174Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The International Commission on Illumination (CIE) recommends researchers to investigate a wide variety of behavioural and health outcomes. However, researchers often investigate only a part of occupational health (OH) in relation to light. A literature study (2002–2017) regarding the relationship between office lighting conditions and OH was performed to identify gaps and methodological issues.

    Method: The OH outcomes investigated in this paper were grouped according to the International Classification of Diseases and analysed per category: physical and physiological health, mental health, eye health, sleep parameters and visual comfort.

    Results: Findings from the literature study (20 eligible papers) showed that all OH aspects were mostly but not exclusively measured subjectively. Furthermore, most studies investigated only a fraction of office lighting parameters and OH aspects.

    Conclusions: It seems that Correlated Colour Temperature (CCT) and illuminance mainly correlate with OH. However, this may also be explained by gaps and methodological issues in studies described in eligible papers. Based on the literature study, an overview was composed elucidating gaps and methodological issues of office lighting and OH studies. It can be used to design and target the purpose of light and health research.

  • 37.
    van Duijnhoven, Juliette
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Aarts, Marielle
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Böhmner, Mylene
    Erasmus Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Recommendations for measuring non-image-forming effects of light: A practical method to apply on cognitive impaired and unaffected participants2017Inngår i: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 25, nr 2, s. 171-186Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The non-image-forming effects of luminous radiation on people with intellectual disabilities or dementia received attention from researchers. Such studies, however, have generally been conducted using disparate methodologies which precludes generalization and reproducibility.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the practical applicability of measurement devices for studies investigating non-image-forming effects of luminous radiation, specifically for people with intellectual disabilities or dementia.

    METHODS: In three experiments, ten cognitive impaired people and thirty-nine unaffected subjects participated by wearing one or more portable devices. Six devices were assessed in total. Measurement data was accompanied with user experiences obtained from questionnaires, interviews and observations in order to assess the devices on practical and comfort issues.

    RESULTS: On average, the devices worn by the cognitive impaired subjects were not experienced as annoying or irritating. No significant differences are found between genders and for one of the portable devices significantly less annoyance was reported by the cognitive impaired participants compared to the unaffected group of participants.

    INNOVATIVE SOLUTION: The three phases of the research process in towards measuring personal luminous exposures are: selection of the most suitable portable device, application of the assessment method, and the application of the device in the (pilot) study.

    CONCLUSIONS: However, the findings of this study suggest that inaccuracies potentially caused by practical and comfort issues associated with the portable devices need to be considered.

  • 38.
    van Duijnhoven, Juliëtte
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Tekniska Högskolan, JTH, Byggnadsteknik och belysningsvetenskap. Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Rosemann, Alexander
    Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Meinung versus Messung: Wie Nutzer das Verhältnis von natürlichem und elektrischem Licht und die Effekte der Lichtsituation im Großraumbüro bewerten2017Inngår i: Licht : Planung - Design - Technik - Handel, ISSN 0171-5496, Vol. 69, nr 5, s. 76-79Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [de]

    Die in diesem Beitrag vorgestellte Studie fragt danach, wie Nutzer das Verhältnis von natürlichemj und künstlichem Licht an ihrem Arbeitsplatz im Grossraumbüro einschätzen. Sie vergleicht diese subjektive Validierung durch die Nutzer mit objektiven Messergebnissen. Zudem erhebt ein Fragebogen Daten zu Zufriedenheit und allgemeinem Befinden. In der anschliessenden statistischen Analyse werden Korrelationen zwischen den verschiedenen Parametern gesucht.

  • 39.
    Van Hoof, J.
    et al.
    Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Westerlaken, A. C.
    Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, Delft, Netherlands.
    Aarts, M. P. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Wouters, E. J. M.
    Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Allied Health Professions, Research Group Health Innovations and Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Schoutens, A. M. C.
    Light and Health Research Foundation (SOLG), Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Sinoo, M. M.
    Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Light therapy: Methodological issues from an engineering perspective2012Inngår i: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 11-23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Light therapy is increasingly administered and studied as a non-pharmacologic treatment for a variety of health-related problems, including treatment of people with dementia. Light therapy comes in a variety of ways, ranging from being exposed to daylight, to being exposed to light emitted by light boxes and ambient bright light. Light therapy is an area in medicine where medical sciences meet the realms of physics, engineering and technology. Therefore, it is paramount that attention is paid in the methodology of studies to the technical aspects in their full breadth. This paper provides an extensive introduction for non-technical researchers on how to describe and adjust their methodology when involved in lighting therapy research. A specific focus in this manuscript is on ambient bright light, as it is an emerging field within the domain of light therapy. The paper deals with how to (i) describe the lighting equipment, (ii) describe the light measurements, (iii) describe the building and interaction with daylight. Moreover, attention is paid to the uncertainty in standards and guidelines regarding light and lighting for older adults.

  • 40.
    Van Hoof, Joost
    et al.
    Institute of Allied Health, Netherlands.
    Aarts, Mariëlle P. J.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Unit Building Physics and Services, Building Lighting, Netherlands.
    Westerlaken, Adriana C.
    TNO, Netherlands.
    Schrader, Björn
    Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Horw/Luzern, Switzerland.
    Wouters, Eveline J. M
    Faculty of allied health professions, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
    Weffers, Harold T. G.
    Intelligent Lighting Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Light therapy in smart healthcare facilities for older adults: An overview2015Inngår i: Recent advances in ambient intelligence and context-aware computing / [ed] Kevin Curran, Hersey, PA: IGI Global, 2015, s. 300-307Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Light therapy is applied as treatment for a variety of problems related to health and ageing, including dementia. Light therapy is administered via light boxes, light showers, and ambient bright light using ceiling-mounted luminaires. Long-term care facilities are currently installing dynamic lighting systems with the aim to improve the well-being of residents with dementia and to decrease behavioural symptoms. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the application of ceiling-mounted dynamic lighting systems as a part of intelligent home automation systems found in healthcare facilities. Examples of such systems are provided and their implementation in practice is discussed. The available, though limited, knowledge has not yet been converted into widespread implementable lighting solutions, and the solutions available are often technologically unsophisticated and poorly evaluated from the perspective of end-users. New validated approaches to the design and application of ambient bright light are needed.

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