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  • 1.
    Cavico, Frank J.
    et al.
    The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, Nova Southeastern University, USA.
    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.
    The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, Nova Southeastern University, USA.
    Nonet, Guénola
    The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, Nova Southeastern University, USA.
    Rimanoczy, Isabel
    The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, Nova Southeastern University, USA.
    Samuel, Marissa
    The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, Nova Southeastern University, USA.
    Developing a legal, ethical, and socially responsible mindset for business leadership2015In: Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, ISSN 2055-0286, Vol. 2, no 6, 9-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main responsibilities of educators is to prepare the future leaders for our communities and society so they can think of the legal, ethical, social, and environmental consequences of their decisions as managers and professionals. In other words, these future leaders must become great forecasters of the impact of their decisions, strategic choices and actions before they execute them. In order to instill ethical values in the minds of future business leaders, it is best to regularly and continuously socialize them with ethical and sustainability expectations from the outset. As such, this article proposes that educators should begin inculcating students through a mandatory “ethics” orientation at the beginning of their studies. Therefore, in this paper, the authors present an overview of an actual ethics orientation program for graduate students along with the overall benefits of it. Relevant recommendations and suggestions are provided for administrators, educators, and curriculum coordinators.

  • 2. Da Fonseca, M.
    et al.
    Nonet, Guénola
    Strategies collectives pour un développement durable, quelles problématiques de légitimité?2013In: Proceedings, RIODD, Réseau International de recherche sur les Organisations et le Développement Durable, June 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Da Fonseca, M.
    et al.
    Nonet, Guénola
    Stratégies de Coopération pour un Développement Durable, Quelles Problématiques de Légitimité2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Mejis, L.
    et al.
    Nonet, Guénola
    Business Schools and Responsible Management: A Long Road to Freedom2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Nonet, Guénola
    An alternative education to enhance responsible leadership and management?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Nonet, Guénola
    An interconnected and sustainable way of life according to Nikola Tesla2015In: The essential Nikola Tesla: peacebuilding endeavor / [ed] Aleksandr Protić, Paris: Tesla Memory Project , 2015, , 75 p.108-111 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7. Nonet, Guénola
    Business school, innovation for responsible management2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Nonet, Guénola
    Business schools, a new era?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Nonet, Guénola
    Business schools, a new era?2013In: Travail, organisations et politiques publiques: quelle soutenabilité à l'heure de la mondialisation ? / [ed] Nadine Richez-Battesti, Francesca Petrella, Patrick Gianfaldoni, Louvain-la-Neuve: Presses universitaires de Louvain , 2013, 203-214 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Nonet, Guénola
    Emotional Competencies’ relevance for Ethical Business2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Nonet, Guénola
    Into the wild and the Principles of Responsible Management Education2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12. Nonet, Guénola
    Into the wild: Pedagogical Innovation for Responsible Management - Rotterdam Schoolof Management - Erasmus University2013In: Inspirational guide for the implementation of PRME: learning to go beyond, Sheffield, UK: Greenleaf Publishing Ltd, 2013, 2, 69-74 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13. Nonet, Guénola
    Quelle pédagogie au sein d’écoles de commerce favorise un approche managériale responsable?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14. Nonet, Guénola
    Une introduction au développement durable2010Book (Other academic)
  • 15. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Atkins, R.
    Food Poverty and Food Waste Management - Governmental and Business Grass Roots Strategies in Food Waste Supply Chain Management2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Collard, C.
    Naim Indrajaya, A.
    Poverty Eradication through Social and Pedagogical Innovation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Nova Southeastern University.
    Kassel, Kerul
    Fielding Graduate University.
    Understanding responsible management2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 17729, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our literature review reveals a call for changes in business education to encourage responsible management. The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) developed in 2007 under the coordination of the United Nations, Global Compact, AACSB International and other leading academic institutions promote responsible management in education. Literature review shows that responsible management as such remains undefined. This gap leads potentially to an absence of clarity in research, education and management, regarding responsible management among scholars and practitioners. This paper attempts to shed some light on the prevailing use of the term “responsible management” and to derive a tentative definition set. Its objective is to define the main characteristics of responsible management aimed at creating a platform for discussion so as to help organizations clarify their own vision. It builds on preliminary findings from literature review that responsible management remains undefined. As no empirical studies that examine business school students’ understanding of responsible management had been conducted to date, as these are primary stakeholders in management education, a qualitative study was conducted with European business school students. A framework summarizing their perceptions of responsible management characteristics was created and used to introduce a draft theoretical platform for discussion.

  • 18.
    Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Nova University HSBE Business School, FL, United States.
    Kassel, Kerul
    School of Human & Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University, California, United States.
    Meijs, Lucas
    Rotterdam School of Management Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Business Schools and Responsible Management: A Long Road to Freedom2014In: Nitte Management Review, ISSN 2231-6043, Vol. 8, no 2, 1-10 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Business Schools are criticized for failing to encourage responsible management, several schools are innovating towards such management for their own organization. This research has a closer look at the people involved in changing the practices at their school and campus (staff and faculty members). 17 interviews were conducted at eight European schools to understand how these responsible strategies and practices are welcomed inside Business Schools. Seven types of tensions were revealed; Priority of ROI, Bottom-up innovation (less impactful than top down innovations), Limited resources allocation, Lack of knowledge and competencies, Transversal issues touching all parts of the school, Limited commitment from the Top and Growing awareness facing denial. The tensions are introduced and described in details in this article.

  • 19.
    Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, United States.
    Kassel, Kerul
    Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Meijs, Lucas
    Erasmus University - Rotterdam School of Management, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Understanding responsible management: Emerging themes and variations from European business school programs2016In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 139, no 4, 717-736 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our literature review reveals a call for changes in business education to encourage responsible management. The Principles for Responsible Management Education were developed in 2007 under the coordination of the United Nations Global Compact, AACSB International, and other leading academic institutions for the purpose of promoting responsible management in education. Literature review shows that responsible management as such remains undefined. This gap in literature leads potentially to an absence of clarity in research, education, and management, regarding responsible management among scholars and practitioners. The aim of this research is to develop a preliminary definition of responsible management, exploring the use of the term in literature and practice. Its objective is to define the main characteristics of responsible management aimed at creating a platform for discussion so as to help organizations clarify their own vision of responsible management. It builds on preliminary findings from literature review that responsible management remains undefined. As business school students are primary stakeholders in management education and are future management leaders, and as there have not been empirical studies to date that examine business school students’ understanding of responsible management, a qualitative study was conducted with European business school students concerning their understanding of the term. A framework summarizing perceptions of responsible management characteristics and broad approach of responsible management definition were created and used to introduce a draft theoretical platform for discussion on this topic.

  • 20.
    Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, United States.
    Kassel, Kerul
    Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Rodhain, Florence
    Montpellier University Montpellier, France.
    How do business schools support internal innovation and work on their strategy and their reputation? The case of responsible management2015In: Journal of Innovation Economics & Management, ISSN 2352-6645, E-ISSN 2032-5355, Vol. 2, no 17, 69-98 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Rodhain, F.
    Business school, pedagogical innovation for responsible management?2012In: Proceedings, école d’été RRI (Réseau de Recherche sur l’Innovation), Summer school RRI, September 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Rodhain, F.
    Business Schools and Responsible Management, A New Strategy?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Rodhain, F.
    Into the wild, pedagogical innovation for responsible management?2013In: Proceedings, ESEE, European Society for Ecological, Economics Annual Conference, June 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: business schools' education encourage responsible management. From the literature we see that one of the wanted change is that students would be more connected to the natural environment. After defining responsible management according to a cross disciplinary study done in 2009, we went on the field to discover a pedagogical innovation: An entire course at the European business school, Rotterdam School of Management Erasmus University is taught outdoors, at a botanical garden. We evaluated whether having a direct contact with the studied environment has an impact on its participants and if it does encourage responsible values towards the environment and ecology. This research uses the grounded theory and shows how impactful is the environment towards sustainable and responsible behaviours regarding environmental issues.

  • 24. Nonet, Guénola
    et al.
    Rodhain, F.
    Into the wild, pedagogical innovation for responsible management?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 24 of 24
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