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  • 1.
    Bakker, Rene
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Shepard, D.
    Indiana University.
    When to “pull the plug” and when to “take the plunge”: the timing of strategic decisions towards new ventures2014In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2014, 4-7 February 2014, Sydney, Australia: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Per Davidsson, Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms face opposing incentives regarding when to take strategic decisions towards their exploration ventures. On the one hand, postponing can reduce uncertainty, but on the other, moving quickly allows capitalizing on a potential competitive advantage. Drawing on theories of entrepreneurship and real options reasoning, we suggest that firms resolve the competing tensions for acceleration and deceleration through an assessment of their venture portfolio and environment. An empirical study of the timing of termination and exploitation decisions taken with regard to 3,272 exploration ventures in Australia’s mining industry over the years 2002-2011 provides an insight into the drivers of decision timing. We find that venture portfolio composition is an important driver of timing— but only with regard to exploitation decisions. Higher levels of market uncertainty increase the time to venture termination but not exploitation, and a positive market trajectory increases the time to venture termination, yet decreases the time to exploitation. Finally, we find support for interaction effects between the portfolio and market. The overall pattern of findings sheds new light on the tension between deceleration and acceleration in entrepreneurial strategic decision making and highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of different types of decisions.

  • 2.
    Bakker, Rene
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology.
    Shepard, Dean A.
    Indiana University.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    When to pull the plug and when to take the plunge: timing strategic decisions about new ventures2014In: The Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings 2014 / [ed] Humphreys, J., Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms face opposing incentives regarding when to make strategic decisions about their exploration ventures. On the one hand, postponing a decision can reduce uncertainty, while on the other hand, moving quickly allows one to capitalize on favorable market conditions. Drawing on theories of entrepreneurship, real options reasoning, and decision speed, we suggest that firms resolve competing tensions between acceleration and deceleration through an assessment of their venture portfolio and environment. An empirical study of the timing of termination and exploitation decisions regarding 3,272 exploration ventures in Australia’s mining industry over the years 2002–2011 provides insights into the drivers of decision timing. We find that venture portfolio composition is an important driver of timing but only with regard to exploitation decisions. Higher levels of market uncertainty increase the time to venture termination but not exploitation, and a positive market trajectory increases the time to venture termination yet decreases the time to venture exploitation. We also find support for an interaction effect between the portfolio and market characteristics. This pattern of findings sheds light on the tension between acceleration and deceleration in strategic decision making and highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of different types of decisions.

  • 3. Chandler, Gaylen
    et al.
    McKelvie, Alexander
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Asset specificity and behavioral uncertainty as moderators of the sales growth: employment growth relationship in emerging ventures2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, Vol. 24, no 4, 373-387 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Chandler, G.N.
    et al.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Opportunity recognition processes: A taxonomy and outcome implications2002In: Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2002: Proceedings of the twenty-second annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Babson Park, Mass.: Babson College , 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Coeurderoy, Régis
    et al.
    ESCP-Europe et Université catholique de Louvain, France.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology.
    Lwango, Albert B.R.
    Groupe ESC Troyes en Champagne, France.
    Murray, Gordon
    School of Business and Economics, University of Exeter, Exeter, England.
    Tywoniak, Stéphane
    Graduate School of Business, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    L’internationalisation des jeunes entreprises de hautes technologies : Le rôle des compétences internationales des fondateurs: [The internationalization of new technology based Firms: the Role of the international Skills of founding Teams]2013In: Finance Contrôle Stratégie, ISSN 2261-5512, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extending recent research on the importance of specific resources and skills for the internationalization of start-ups, this article tests a negative binomial model on a sample of 520 recently created high technology firms from the UK and Germany. The results show that previous international experience of entrepreneurs facilitates the rapid penetration of foreign markets, especially when the company features a clear and deliberate strategic intent of internationalization from the outset. This research provides one of the first empirical studies linking the influence of entrepreneurial teams to a high probability of success in the internationalization of high-technology ventures.

  • 6.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Chandler, G.N.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Patterns of search and the newness of venture ideas2004In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2004: proceedings of the twenty-fourth annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Welleseley, MA: Babson College , 2004, 315-326 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Business start-up reasons and firm performance2000In: Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2000: Proceedings of the twentieth annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Paul D. Reynolds, Wellesley, Mass.: Babson College , 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dahlqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Initial Conditions as Predictors of New Venture Performance: A Replication and Extension of the Cooper et al. study2000In: Enterprise and Innovation Management Studies, ISSN 1463-2446, E-ISSN 1469-5863, Vol. 1, no 1, 1-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    A future of entrepreneurship research: domain, data, theory, and impact2017In: The Wiley handbook of entrepreneurship / [ed] G. Ahmetoglu, T. Chamorro-Premuzic, B. Klinger and T. Karcisky, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, 3-23 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers some “business school researcher” observations and speculations about current and possible future developments in the field of entrepreneurship research. Particular topics include the delineation of the “entrepreneurship research” field and community; data and data sources; the quest for increased theoretical precision, and demands for practical relevance and real-world impact. The chapter concludes that the future of entrepreneurship research offers both challenges and opportunities, and that it will remain an exciting field for scholarly study.

  • 10.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2014, 4-7 February 2014, Sydney, Australia: Conference Proceedings2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Engagement, persistence, progress and success as theoretically distinct aspects of business creation processes2011In: Proceedings of the thirty-first annual entrepreneurship research conference / [ed] Zacharakis, A., Carter, S., Gruber, M., leleux, B., Corbett, A., Honig, B., Lumpkin, T., Delmar, F., Kelley, D., Marino, L., Edelman, L., Kickul, J., and Schindehutte, M., 2011, 307-321 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting from the vantage point that explaining success at creating a venture should be the unique contribution—or at least one unique contribution—of entrepreneurship research, we argue that this success construct has not yet been adequately defined and operationalized. We thus offer suggestions for more precise conceptualization and measurement of this central construct. Rather than regarding various success proxies used in prior research as poor operationalizations of success we argue that they represent other important aspects of the venture creation process: engagement, persistence and progress. We hold that in order to attain a better understanding of venture creation these constructs also need to be theoretically defined. Further, their respective drivers need to be theorized and tested separately. We suggest theoretical definitions of each. We then develop and test hypotheses concerning how human capital, venture idea novelty and business planning has different impact on the different assessments of the process represented by engagement, persistence, progress and success. The results largely confirm the stated hypotheses, suggesting that the conceptual and empirical approach we are suggesting is a path towards improved understanding of the central entrepreneurship phenomenon of new venture creation.

  • 12.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Entrepreneurial growth2014In: Wiley Encyclopedia of Management, Volume III: Entrepreneurship, John Wiley & Sons, 2014, 3Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Entrepreneurial Growth2005In: The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Management: Volume 3: Entrepreneurship, Maden, MA: Blackwell , 2005, 80-82 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Entrepreneurial opportunities as propensities: Do Ramoglou & Tsang move the field forward?2016In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, E-ISSN 1837-9664Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ramoglou & Tsang's (R&T) article “A realist perspective of entrepreneurship: Opportunities as propensities” is a recent, potentially influential addition to the literature on “entrepreneurial opportunities”. This short communication argues that R&T's intellectual exercise largely fails to move matters forward on the two most central problems with prior research on “entrepreneurial opportunities”, namely 1) lack of construct clarity and 2) slow progress regarding how characteristics of “entrepreneurial opportunities” give shape to entrepreneurial action and outcomes. I suggest that entrepreneurship researchers should avoid the detour of conceptually dichotomizing complex and empirically non-tractable sets of external circumstances into “opportunities” vs. “non-opportunities” and instead direct attention to multi-dimensional and continuous variation in “those [evolving] entities which entrepreneurs actually evaluate and [sometimes] act upon” (and which should not be mislabeled as “opportunities”). For this endeavor, the notion of “agency-intensity” is the primary take-away from R&T's study.

  • 15.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Getting published – and cited in entrepreneurship: Reflections on ten papers2014In: How to get published in the best entrepreneurship journals: a guide to steer your academic career / [ed] Alain Fayolle and Mike Wright, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 46-71 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I grew up in academic heaven. At least for me it was. Not only was Sweden in the late 1980s paradise for any kind of empirical research, with rich and high-quality business statistics being made available to researchers without them having to sign away their lives; 70+ percent response rates achieved in mail surveys to almost any group (if you knew how to do them), and boards of directors opening their doors to more qualitatively orientated researchers to sit in during their meetings. In addition, I perceived an environment with a very high degree of academic freedom, letting me do whatever I found interesting and important. I’m sure for others it was sheer hell, with very unclear career paths and rules of the game. Career progression (something which rarely entered my mind) meant that you tried as best you could and then you put all your work – reports, books, book chapters, conference papers, maybe even published articles – in a box and had some external committee of professors look at it. If you were lucky they liked what they saw for whatever reasons their professorial wisdom dictated, and you got hired or promoted. If you were not so lucky you wouldn’t get the job or the promotion, without quite knowing why. So people could easily imagine an old boys club – whose members were themselves largely unproven in international, peer review publishing – picking whoever they wanted by whatever criteria they choose to apply. Neither the fact that assessors were external nor the presence of an appeals system might have completely appeased your suspicious and skeptical mind, considering the balance of power.

  • 16.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Looking back at 20 years of entrepreneurship research: What did we learn?2008In: Entrepreneurship, sustainable growth and performance: frontiers in European entrepreneurship research, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2008, 13-26 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Method Challenges and Opportunities in the Psychological Study of Entrepreneurship2007In: The Psychology of Entrepreneurship, Mahway, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum , 2007, 287-323 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Method issues in the study of venture start-up processes2005In: Entrepreneurship Research in Europe: Outcomes and Perspectives, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2005, 35-54 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Methodological approaches to entrepreneurship: Past research and suggestions for the future2005In: Small Enterprise Research, ISSN 1321-9506, Vol. 13, no 1, 1-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Nascent Entrepreneurship: Empirical Studies and Developments2006Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The key ideas behind the empirical study of ‘nascent entrepreneurship’ are that the research aims to identify a statistically representative sample of on-going venture start-up efforts and that these start-up efforts are subsequently followed over time so that insights can be gained also into process issues and determinants of outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to take stock of the developments of ‘nascent entrepreneur’ – or ‘firm gestation’ – research so far, and to suggest directions for future research efforts along those lines. For this purpose a review has been made of some 75 journal articles, various book chapters, conference papers and research reports.

    The review shows that the current approach to capturing on-going start-up efforts and studying their concurrent development longitudinally is a basically sound, workable approach that has opened up a new and very promising avenue for entrepreneurship research. While many interesting results have already been reported and while considerable improvements on both the method and theory sides of research have been made, there is still room and need for further improvements. A set of 17 specific propositions is developed towards that end.

  • 21.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    New firm startups2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Opportunities, propensities, and misgivings: Some closing comments2017In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 8, 123-124 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Paul D. Reynolds: Entrepreneurship research innovator, coordinator, and disseminator2005In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, Vol. 24, no 4, 351-358 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, QUT, Australia.
    Reflections on misgivings about “dismantling” the opportunity construct2017In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 7, 65-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Researching Entrepreneurship2004Book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. QUT Business School, Australia.
    Researching entrepreneurship: conceptualization and design2016 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Researching Entrepreneurship is targeted primarily at research students and academics who are relatively new to research or to entrepreneurship research. This said, basic knowledge of research methods is assumed, and when foundational issues are discussed they are typically approach from a non-standard angle and/or with an eye to illuminate entrepreneurship-specific problems and solutions. This makes large parts of the contents potentially valuable for entrepreneurship scholars at any level of research proficiency. The book is also of interest to sophisticated, non-academic users with a professional interest in collecting and analyzing data from emerging and young ventures, and to those who make use of published entrepreneurship research. For example, analysts in marketing research or consultancy firms, business associations, statistical agencies and other government offices may find this book to be a valuable tool. Moreover, while the examples are derived from entrepreneurship research, the book provides a unique "experienced empirical researcher" (rather than "textbook method expert") treatment of issues that are of equal relevance across the social sciences. This goes for topics like the role of theory; research design; validity assessment; statistical inference, and replication.

    Entrepreneurship research has developed rapidly in the decade that has passed since the first edition. Therefore, all chapters have been comprehensively updated and many have been extended; sometimes to twice the original length. Two of the original chapters have been excluded to make room for entirely new chapters on “the Dependent Variable” and “The Entrepreneurship Nexus.” While retaining a unique, personal tone, the author uses examples and references that build on contributions from a large number of top entrepreneurship researchers.

  • 27.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Review of the book: Entrepreneurship Programs and the Modern University by M.H Morris, D.F. Kuratko and J.R. Cornwall2015In: Academy of Management Learning & Education, ISSN 1537-260X, Vol. 14, no 1, 139-142 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Role Models and Perceived Social Support2004In: Handbook of Entrepreneurial Dynamics: The Process of Business Creation in Contemporary America, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage , 2004, 179-185 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology.
    Some reflection on research 'Schools' and geographies2013In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 25, no 1-2, 100-110 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflecting on real and perceived differences between European and North American research cultures, I challenge views that European research is under appreciated or discriminated against, and caution against isolationist European positions. Instead, I argue that although no distinctive and coherent European tradition or culture really exists, there may be elements of the prevalent research culture that can be turned into an advantage for Europe-based and/or European-trained researchers in helping to influence and improve one, global research conversation. Of course, a range of sub-communities and sub-conversations will and should exist, but there is no reason for these to be based on geography.

  • 30.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Creation and Destruction of Social Capital: Entrepreneurship, Co-operative Movements and Institutions2006In: The Journal of Socio-Economics, ISSN 1053-5357, Vol. 35, no 6, 1092-1094 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The entrepreneurial process2012In: Enterprise and Small Business: principles, practice and policy / [ed] Carter, S & D. & Jones-Evans, D., Harlow: Pearson , 2012, 3, 95-119 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter revolves around research-based insights into the entrepreneurial process. By is meant the process of setting up a new business activity resulting in a new market offer. This new offer may be made by a new or an existing firm, although the main focus here is on the start-up of new, independent firms. Further, the new offer maybe innovative, bringing to the market something that was not offered before or imita­tive i.e., a new competitor enters the market with products or services very similar to what other firms are already offering. Although the lsatter type of process may be less complex and also have less market impact, it still entails most of the steps that typically have to be taken in order to get a business up and running. If successful, it also shares, at least to some degree, the consequences that signify entrepreneurial processes:

    - it gives consumers new choice alternatives- it gives incumbent firms reason to shape up- it attracts additional followers to enter the market, further reinforcing the first two effects (Davidsson, 2004).

    Besides, imitative start-ups outnumber by far innovative ones (Reynolds et al., 2003; Samuelsson and Davidsson, 2009).

  • 32.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Entrepreneurship Research Challenge2008Book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    The field of entrepreneurship research: Some significant developments2016In: Contemporary entrepreneurship: Multidisciplinary perspectives on innovation and growth / [ed] Dieter Bögenhold, Jean Bonnet, Marcus Dejardin, & Domingo Garcia Pérez de Lema, Cham: Springer, 2016, 17-28 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses significant developments in the field of entrepreneurship research. These include, but are not limited to: (a) considerable growth in volume, quality, and theory-drivenness; (b) a drift of the main emphasis from small scale and independent ownership towards newness and novelty realized through a multitude of organizational solutions; (c) interest in multiple aspects of the entrepreneurial individual beyond personality; (d) moving beyond the individuals towards teams, networks and social capital; (e) viewing entrepreneurship as a multi-level phenomenon, with increased emphasis on outcomes beyond the individual- and firm-level financial result; (f) realizing the heterogeneous, context-dependent and process nature of entrepreneurial practice, along with the challenges to generalizability and research design that follow from this. These developments, including the increased focus on theory and theoretical contributions, have served the field well. This said, the author argues that we are now at a juncture where recognizing a broader set of types of scholarly contributions would be even more beneficial.

  • 34.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The types and contextual fit of entrepreneurial processes2005In: International Journal Entrepreneurship Education, ISSN 1649-2269, Vol. 2, no 4, 407-430 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The types and contextual fit of entrepreneurial processes2006In: Modern Perspectives on Entrepreneurship, Dublin: Senate Hall , 2006, 1-22 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    What do entrepreneurs learn in the venture creation process – when to quit or how to succeed2011In: Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2011 / [ed] Maritz, A, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Davidsson, Per
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    What entrepreneurship research can do for business and policy practice2002In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship Education, Vol. 1, 5-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Research on small-firm growth: A review2005In: Paper presented at the 35th EISB Conference, Barcelona, September 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Small Firm Growth2010In: Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1551-3114, Vol. 6, no 2, 69-166 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review and discuss the literature on small firm growth with an intention to provide a useful vantage point for new research studies regarding this important phenomenon. We first discuss conceptual and methodological issues that represent critical choices for those who research growth and which make it challenging to compare results from previous studies. The substantial review of past research is organized into four sections representing two smaller and two larger literatures. The first of the latter focuses on internal and external drivers of small firm growth. Here we find that much has been learnt and that many valuable generalizations can be made. However, we also conclude that more research of the same kind is unlikely to yield much. While interactive and non-linear effects may be worth pursuing it is unlikely that any new and important growth drivers or strong, linear main effects would be found. The second "large" literature deals with organizational life-cycles or stages of development. While deservedly criticized for unwarranted determinism and weak empirics this type of approach addresses problems of high practical and also theoretical relevance, and should not be shunned by researchers. We argue that with a change in the fundamental assumptions and improved empirical design, research on the organizational and managerial consequences of growth is an important line of inquiry. With this, we overlap with one of the "smaller" literatures, namely studies focusing on the effects of growth. We argue that studies too often assume that growth equals success. We advocate instead the use of growth as an intermediary variable that influences more fundamental goals in ways that should be carefully examined rather than assumed. The second "small" literature distinguishes between different modes or forms of growth, including, e.g., organic vs. acquisition-based growth, and international expansion. We note that modes of growth is an important topic that has been under studied in the growth literature, whereas in other branches of research aspects of it may have been studied intensely, but not primarily from a growth perspective. In the final section we elaborate on ways forward for research on small firm growth. We point at rich opportunities for researchers who look beyond drivers of growth, where growth is viewed as a homogenous phenomenon assumed to unambiguously reflect success, and instead focus on growth as a process and a multi-dimensional phenomenon, as well as on how growth relates to more fundamental outcomes.

  • 40.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    What do we know about small firm growth?2006In: The life cycle of entrepreneurial ventures, New York: Springer , 2006, 361-398 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Department of Management, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Baker, Ted
    Department of Management and Global Business, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
    Senyard, Julienne Marie
    Department of Marketing, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    A measure of entrepreneurial bricolage behavior2017In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 23, no 1, 114-135 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The majority of emerging and young firms work under resource constraints. This has made researchers highlight the importance of resourcefulness. Perhaps the most important theoretical development in this context is the emerging, behavioral theory of entrepreneurial bricolage. However, although academic interest is increasing, research on entrepreneurial bricolage has been hampered by the lack of robust instruments that allow large-scale theory testing. The purpose is to help fill this void. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and contents of a novel measure of entrepreneurial bricolage behavior and assesses its validity. The measure is intended to be applicable in broadly based, quantitative studies.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The instrument was developed as a unidimensional, reflective measure. Standard protocols for scale development were followed. The validation uses primary, longitudinal data from four samples of nascent and young firms as well as published, cross-sectional evidence from another four samples representing different contexts and variations to the data collection procedure.

    Findings

    Promising results are reported concerning the reliability as well as the discriminant and nomological validity of the measure. Based on the pre-testing and validation experiences guidelines are also provided for attempts at further improvements.

    Originality/value

    This paper presents a novel measure developed by the authors, which holds promise for being a useful tool for future research on the prevalence, antecedents, and consequences of entrepreneurial bricolage. Previously, no established measure of entrepreneurial bricolage behavior existed, and the few partial measures appearing in the literature have not been comprehensively evaluated. Thus, we offer a comprehensive and elaborate presentation of a measure only briefly introduced in Davidsson (2016) and Senyard et al., (2014).

  • 42.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Coeurderoy, Regis
    Catholic University Louvain.
    Tywoniak, Stephane
    Queensland University of Technology.
    The Role of Human Capital and Strategic Intent in Internationalisation Scope of New Technology-Based Firms2008In: Innovation For a Sustainable Future: Visions For 2020 : PBFEAM 2008, 16th Annual Conference On Pacific Basin : 2-4 July 2008, Brisbane Australia / [ed] Tim Robinson, MarkChristensen and Angela Fletcher, Brisbane: Faculty of Business, Queensland University of Technology , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Delmar, F.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Entrepreneurship and the Growth of Firms2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Delmar, Frédéric
    Les entreprises à forte croissance et leur contribution à l’emploi: le cas de la Suède 1987-19962002In: Revue Gestion 2000, ISSN 0773-0543, Vol. 5, 167-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Delmar, Frédéric
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship as growth: growth as entrepreneurship2006In: Entrepreneurship and the Growth of Firms / [ed] P. Davidsson, F. Delmar & J. Wiklund, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2006, 21-38 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Delmar, Frédéric
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Introduction2006In: Entrepreneurship and the Growth of Firms / [ed] P. Davidsson, F. Delmar & J. Wiklund, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2006, 1-18 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology.
    Gordon, Scott R.
    Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre, The University of Adelaide.
    Much ado about nothing? The surprising persistence of nascent entrepreneurs through macroeconomic crisis2016In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 40, no 4, 915-941 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We hypothesize that a major macroeconomic crisis triggers four alternative responses among nascent entrepreneurs: disengagement, delay, compensation, and adaptation. We also suggest that commitment and ambition (or “high potential”) moderate these responses. Our most important finding is the relative absence of behavioral crisis responses. However, crises may make high-tech founders become more likely to disengage, whereas the opposite holds for founders far into the process. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms behind aggregate effects of crises on the number and type of start-ups in an economy, and can guide future research on the effect of crises on nascent entrepreneurship.

  • 48.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Gordon, Scott R.
    Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology.
    Panel studies of new venture creation: a methods-focused review and suggestions for future research2012In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 39, no 4, 853-876 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal panel studies of large, random samples of business start-ups captured at the pre-operational stage allow researchers to address core issues for entrepreneurship research, namely, the processes of creation of new business ventures as well as their antecedents and outcomes. Here, we perform a methods-orientated review of all 83 journal articles that have used this type of data set, our purpose being to assist users of current data sets as well as designers of new projects in making the best use of this innovative research approach. Our review reveals a number of methods issues that are largely particular to this type of research. We conclude that amidst exemplary contributions, much of the reviewed research has not adequately managed these methods challenges, nor has it made use of the full potential of this new research approach. Specifically, we identify and suggest remedies for context-specific and interrelated methods challenges relating to sample definition, choice of level of analysis, operationalization and conceptualization, use of longitudinal data and dealing with various types of problematic heterogeneity. In addition, we note that future research can make further strides towards full utilization of the advantages of the research approach through better matching (from either direction) between theories and the phenomena captured in the data, and by addressing some under-explored research questions for which the approach may be particularly fruitful.

  • 49.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Australian centre for entrepreneurship research, Queensland university of technology, Australia.
    Gordon, Scott R.Australian centre for entrepreneurship research, Queensland university of technology, Australia.Bergmann, HeikoUniversity af St. Gallen, Switzerland and University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    Nascent Entrepreneurship2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Henreksson, Magnus
    Determinants of the prevalence of start-ups and high-growth firms2002In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, Vol. 19, no 2, 81-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 122
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