Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Al-Najjar, Nasik
    School of Technology and Design/Civil Engineering, Växjö University, Sweden.
    The future water supply of Växjö municipality – evaluation of different alternatives2007In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 299-312Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The water supply in Växjö municipality has since 1887 been based on surface water from Lake Helgasjön. A water treatment plant was built in 1957 and was extensively reconstructed in 1969 but there are still problems to accomplish with drinking water quality, mainly related to temperature, smell and taste, manganese and aluminium rest. The present water consumption has periodically approached the water treatment plant maximum capacity. A performed risk analysis showed that catastrophic consequences for the water supply could occur due to an accident in a nearby traffic route or discharges from an industrial area. In 1997 Växjö municipality decided to perform a comprehensive investigation of different alternatives for future water supply. Seven alternatives were evaluated including remedial measures at the present water treatment plant. The chosen alternative was based on supply and conveying ground water from the Berga Esker in Ljungby municipality. Re-infiltration of ground water will be used to guarantee the required water quality and quantity and will be implemented in autumn 2008 with a planned supply of 200 l per second delivered to about 70,000 persons in the municipalities of Växjö and Alvesta. The article describes the different alternatives, motives for the chosen alternative and the evaluation procedure.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 2.
    Al-Najjar, Nasik
    et al.
    School of Technology and Design/Civil Engineering, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hultman, Bengt
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The water and wastewater situation in Iraq – problems and possibilities for counter-measures2004In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 269-274Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A summary is given of the water and wastewater situation in Iraq before the Gulf War 1991, the situation after the Gulf War and the recent effects of the conflict in 2003. The access of safe water was halved in certain governorates after March 2003 and half of the sewage works were out of function with a discharge of untreated wastewater into rivers and channels. The supply of electricity was less than 4 hours per day in January 2004 and caused discharges of untreated sewage on streets etc. The leakage from the water net was estimated at 60%. The wastewater system in 3 out of 5 schools was estimated to be out of function and epidemics have especially affected children and caused increased mortality. Special issues like the illegal openings of water pipes and security have worsened the situation. The Swedish knowledge of water and wastewater handling may have an important role in rebuilding water and wastewater handling in Iraq and different possibilities are exemplified.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 3.
    Najar, Nasik
    Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering School of Architecture and the Built Environment Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Water management and performance on local and global scales: A comparison between two regions and their possibilities of knowledge transfer2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem to secure safe water supply, good sanitation and a good watercourse and marine environment status has become increasingly complex and at the same time more and more important to meet. It has been recognized, that an integrated approach must be used to meet not only technical and scientific aspects, but the role should also be included of factors such as economics, acceptability, capacity building, and efficient management in the overall view. Integrated approach efforts need to be introduced at different levels, i.e. among the population as well as at municipal, regional (county administrative board, county council, water authority) national and international (EU, global) levels. An important goal is that various activities should follow similar objectives.

    One important factor in this respect is the Brundtland report in which the concept of sustainability was highlighted and universally accepted, even though similar ideas had been put forward earlier. Based on the concept of sustainability a common policy has been developed from Agenda 21 at the local level to globally formulated Millennium targets. Independently of the country, general consensus seems to exist on overall goals for water and sanitation. However, there is a big difference in the way the goals have been implemented in different countries depending on priorities to other areas of concern as political systems, economic conditions, and the degree of capacity building. The experience developed in Sweden and in large parts of the Western world has been judged to be of great value to be transferred to other countries with a lower development or lower standards of water and sewerage systems. For this reason, several global and regional agreements are presented, and two regions (the Baltic Sea and the MENA regions) were chosen to assess similarities and differences between them. Obvious differences are the relatively abundant supply of water in the Baltic region, while the MENA region is one of the world's poorest regions with regard to water availability. Major differences also exist between countries within each region. Among the similarities is the need to achieve similar demands on the quality of discharged wastewater in the long run. The Baltic Sea Action Plan controls the stringent requirements of wastewater quality in the Baltic region, and in the MENA region the growing interest in wastewater reuse for irrigation, industrial use and also for reuse as clean water is the guiding factor.

    On the national level Sweden and Iraq have been selected for description and discussion and at local level Växjö in Sweden and the cities of Baghdad and Erbil in Iraq and the Kurdistan region of Iraq, respectively. While Växjö municipality has been able to follow a path in line with achieving sustainability the situation of cities in Iraq and Kurdistan are entirely different due to failed investments and maintenance of infrastructure for a long time as well as the effects of war. This is discussed in detail and the actions needed to restore and improve the infrastructure are described.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 4.
    Najar, Nasik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science. School of Technology and Design, Department of Civil Engineering, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hultman, Bengt
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cost-effective water supply and sanitation2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water supply and sanitation have about the same goals all over the world. The needs for safe water supply and sanitation are obvious although not generally implemented. This depends often on the economical situation and bad management. Additional factors are effects of war actions and natural disasters as flooding of rivers and tsunamis. The strategies are, however, similar independent of the actual conditions. In this paper the strategies as developed in Sweden are described related to practical implementation of technology and management strategies. The experiences have shown on both mistakes and successful handling. Today, Sweden is involved in both adjusting policies according to European Union rules (as EU Water Framework Directive) and also in sharing experiences to facilitate international implementation of cost-effective methods.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 5.
    Najar, Nasik
    et al.
    School of Technology and Design, Department of Civil Engineering, Växjö University, Sweden, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hultman, Bengt
    Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Land and Water Resources, KTH. Stockholm, Stockholm Sweden.
    Water management and technology in Swedish municipalities - assessment of possibilities of exchange and transfer of experiences2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The water and wastewater infrastructure began to be developed in Sweden more than one hundred years ago. Much attention was given, in the beginning, to fire prevention and hygienic problems with water borne diseases. Somewhat later storm sewers (combined system) were constructed to remove storm water and wastewater and then successively more efficient wastewater treatment plants were developed. Today water and wastewater handling is seen as a multidisciplinary subject where also attention is given to possible effects of climate changes and possibilities for resources recovery.

    Implementation of advanced water and wastewater systems involves not only different technologies but also effective administration and legislation. The implementation may be on national (also involving EU directives), regional and local scale. As a case study, the local implementation will be illustrated for the municipality Växjö in South Sweden with about 80,000 inhabitants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 6.
    Najar, Nasik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Persson, M. Kenneth
    Division of Water Resources Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strategies, processes, and results for the future water supply of the Växjö municipality: Evaluation of an evidence-based case study of long-term strategies within the water and wastewater sector in Sweden2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 2150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2009, the Bergaåsen Water Supply Scheme was put into operation to ensure the future drinking water supply of two municipalities in southern Sweden. Bergaåsen replaced two vulnerable water treatment plants. It was implemented in an environment that was characterized by sensitive recipients and limited access to water. This article aims to analyze how strategies were developed to meet sustainability requirements, if this solution has ensured good quantity and high quality after ten years of operation, and the extent of the project's economic impact on consumers. The project was analyzed as an evidence-based case study using semi-structured interviews, surveys, and document analyses. The study found that the chosen options succeeded in guaranteeing outstanding quality and secure delivery. Over 90% of water users were satisfied and had trust in it, and less than 3% were dissatisfied. The design time for withdrawal capacity has been extended from 30 to 50 years through planned measures. The study clarifies also that, due to some externalities, there has been virtually no economic impact on users. Bergaåsen is a clear case for the value of developing long-term strategies and implementing them in real life.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf