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  • 1.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Beute, F.
    LightGreen Wellbeing, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Fischl, Géza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Students in good mood appear slower and less accurate: A pilot study investigating dynamic lighting impact on students’ perception and performance2019In: Proceedings of the 29th Session of the CIE: Washington D.C., USA, June 14 – 22, 2019, Volume 1 – Part 2, Vienna: The International Commission on Illumination, 2019, Vol. 1, p. 1297-1304Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic daylight can provide stimulation throughout the day. Since not all building spaces have access to enough daylight, electric lighting solutions can help substituting. The study investigated the effect of two opposite, daily dynamic light patterns to influence students’ mood and performance. In a mimicked open office space, 20 second-year students participated in a pilot study where they were exposed to light patterns changing in illuminance level over a day and filled out momentary assessments five times. Hierarchical Linear Models were employed to analyse the effect of light level as well as the timing of the exposure. Positive effects are shown for mood, but only for the pattern with a high morning light level. An afternoon boost may come too late to exert benefits. There are indications for performance-enhancing effects by use of dynamic light conditions, even though students seem to be slower and less accurate when in good mood.

  • 2.
    Fischl, Géza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Granath, Kaj
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Bremner, Craig
    Charles Sturt University, School of Communication and Creative Industries, Wagga Wagga, Australia.
    Mapping architectural engineering students' learning in group design exercises2018In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Kanazawa, Japan, June 28 - July 2, 2018 / [ed] C. Bean, J. Bennedsen, K. Edström, R. Hugo, J. Roslöf, R. Songer & T. Yamamoto, Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 849-859Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Architectural engineering encompasses urban planning and architectural design exercises that are part of professional development  In contrast to the engineering discipline, the regularity of well-defined familiar tasks does not predominate in a design studio. However, to be able to work along with a larger pool of professionals and increase the potential for creative problem solving it is imperative to provide an engineering education that challenges the conventions of its framework. Consequently, students encountering design problems without prior experience need to assume responsibility for their interpretation of the problems in which they are being challenged. The aim of this pilot study was to survey, describe and analyze the problem-solving approach among undergraduate students in relation to their control strategies and successive learning. The study was completed in Jönköping, Sweden. In an online survey (N=32) using convenience sampling, students' locus of control (LOC) as the measure for control strategies over their learning situation was assessed in three school years within the undergraduate program. Additionally, three focus group interviews were performed to shed light on how individual learning modes manifested on different LOC levels and in respective school years. Descriptive statistics showed a trend that students' LOC is moving from external to be more internal by the advancement in their studies. Accordingly, they would over time develop a preference for group design exercises that are more problem-oriented,  rather than  assignment-based,  thus  matching  a  more  internal  LOC. Although the trend was clear, statistically significant differences were not found between the measured variables (LOC, gender, age, school year: subject major), possibly due to the low sample  size. The  focus  group  interviews  supported  the  trend,  where  students'  initial frustration over unclear instructions and dependence on external control gradually shifts toward  a  more  reflective  attitude  and  a  greater  feeling  of  internal  control,  individual competence and professional development.

  • 3.
    Soheilian, Moe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Moadab, Nima Hafezparast
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Fischl, Géza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Comparison of simulated energy consumption by smart and conventional lighting systems in a residential setting2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigated and compared how the energy consumption of a conventional and Smart Lighting System (SLS) in a simulated residential setting is affected by different households’ arrangements and occupancy pattern. An agent-based simulation model of a one-bedroom apartment in Sweden was chosen for comparison with different scenarios. The result shows that the number of residents within an apartment does not necessarily lead to higher energy consumption. Further findings indicate that, even though it has standby energy consumption, SLS is more energy efficient compared to the conventional lighting system. Additionally, energy consumption during weekends was considerably higher than during weekdays.

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