Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Beam, Christopher R.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Turkheimer, Eric
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, United States.
    Levine, Morgan E.
    Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Zandi, Ebrahim
    Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center & Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Guterbock, Thomas M.
    Center for Survey Research and Department of Sociology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Giangrande, Evan J.
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Ryan, Lesa
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Pasquenza, Natalie
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Davis, Deborah W.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Midlife study of the Louisville Twins: Connecting cognitive development to biological and cognitive aging2020In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Louisville Twin Study (LTS) began in 1958 and became a premier longitudinal twin study of cognitive development. The LTS continuously collected data from twins through 2000 after which the study closed indefinitely due to lack of funding. Now that the majority of the sample is age 40 or older (61.36%, N = 1770), the LTS childhood data can be linked to midlife cognitive functioning, among other physical, biological, social, and psychiatric outcomes. We report results from two pilot studies in anticipation of beginning the midlife phase of the LTS. The first pilot study was a participant tracking study, in which we showed that approximately 90% of the Louisville families randomly sampled (N = 203) for the study could be found. The second pilot study consisted of 40 in-person interviews in which twins completed cognitive, memory, biometric, and functional ability measures. The main purpose of the second study was to correlate midlife measures of cognitive functioning to a measure of biological age, which is an alternative index to chronological age that quantifies age as a function of the breakdown of structural and functional physiological systems, and then to relate both of these measures to twins’ cognitive developmental trajectories. Midlife IQ was uncorrelated with biological age (−.01) while better scores on episodic memory more strongly correlated with lower biological age (−.19 to −.31). As expected, midlife IQ positively correlated with IQ measures collected throughout childhood and adolescence. Additionally, positive linear rates of change in FSIQ scores in childhood significantly correlated with biological age (−.68), physical functioning (.71), and functional ability (−.55), suggesting that cognitive development predicts lower biological age, better physical functioning, and better functional ability. In sum, the Louisville twins can be relocated to investigate whether and how early and midlife cognitive and physical health factors contribute to cognitive aging. 

  • 2.
    Davis, Deborah W
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics,University of Louisville School of Medicine,Louisville, KY,USA..
    Turkheimer, Eric
    Department of Psychology,University of Virginia,Charlottesville, VA,USA..
    Finkel, Deborah
    Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences,Indiana University Southeast,New Albany, IN,USA..
    Beam, Christopher
    Department of Psychology, Dornsife College,University of Southern California,Los Angeles, CA,USA..
    Ryan, Lesa
    Department of Pediatrics,University of Louisville School of Medicine,Louisville, KY,USA..
    The Louisville Twin Study: Past, Present and Future.2019In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Louisville Twin Study (LTS) is nationally recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive studies of child development related to multiple birth status. The LTS is unique because of the extensive longitudinal face-to-face assessments, the frequency of data collection, the inclusion of data on additional family members (i.e., parents, siblings, grandparents; and later, twins' own spouses and children), and the variety of data collection methods used. Data preservation efforts began in 2008 and are largely complete, although efforts are ongoing to obtain funding to convert the electronic data to a newer format. A pilot study was completed in the summer of 2018 to bring the twins, who are now middle-aged, back for testing. A grant is currently under review to extend the pilot study to include all former participants who are now ≥40 years of age. Opportunities for collaboration are welcome.

  • 3. Duggan, Emily C.
    et al.
    Piccinin, Andrea M.
    Clouston, Sean
    Koval, Andriy V.
    Robitaille, Annie
    Zammit, Andrea R.
    Wu, Chenkai
    Brown, Cassandra L.
    Lee, Lewina O.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Beasley, William H.
    Kaye, Jeffrey
    Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
    Katz, Mindy
    Lipton, Richard B.
    Deeg, Dorly
    Bennett, David A.
    Björk, Marcus Praetorius
    Johansson, Boo
    Spiro, Avron
    Weuve, Jennifer
    Hofer, Scott M.
    A multi-study coordinated meta-analysis of pulmonary function and cognition in aging2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 74, no 11, p. 1793-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Substantial research is dedicated to understanding the aging-related dynamics among individual differences in level, change, and variation across physical and cognitive abilities. Evaluating replicability and synthesizing these findings has been limited by differences in measurements and samples, and by study design and statistical analyses confounding between-person differences with within-person changes. In this paper, we conducted a coordinated analysis and summary meta-analysis of new results on the aging-related dynamics linking pulmonary function and cognitive performance.

    METHODS: We performed coordinated analysis of bivariate growth models in data from 20,586 participants across eight longitudinal studies to examine individual differences in baseline level, rate of change, and occasion-specific variability in pulmonary and cognitive functioning. Results were summarized using meta-analysis.

    RESULTS: We found consistent but weak baseline and longitudinal associations in levels of pulmonary and cognitive functioning, but no associations in occasion-specific variability.

    CONCLUSIONS: Results provide limited evidence for a consistent link between simultaneous changes in pulmonary and cognitive function in a normal aging population. Further research is required to understand patterns of onset of decline and differences in rates of change within and across physical and cognitive functioning domains, both within-individuals and across countries and birth cohorts. Coordinated analysis provides an efficient and rigorous approach for replicating and comparing results across independent longitudinal studies.

  • 4.
    Emery, Charles F.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, USA.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evidence of bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and body mass among older adults2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Body fat, measured with body mass index (BMI), and obesity are associated with depressive symptoms. Among younger adults there is stronger evidence of obesity leading to depressive symptoms than of depressive symptoms leading to obesity, but the temporal relationship is unknown among older adults. This study utilized dual-change-score models (DCSMs) to determine the directional relationship between body mass and depressive symptoms among older adults.

    METHOD: Participants (n=1743) from the Swedish Twin Registry (baseline age range 50-96 years) completed at least one assessment of BMI (nurse measurement of height and weight) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CESD). More than half the sample completed three or more assessments, scheduled at intervals of 2-4 years. DCSMs modeled the relationship of BMI and CESD across age, both independently and as part of bivariate relationships.

    RESULTS: Depressive symptoms contributed to subsequent changes in BMI after age 70, while BMI contributed to subsequent changes in depressive symptoms after age 82. Thus, there is a reciprocal relationship that may change with age. The effect was more pronounced for women.

    DISCUSSION: The association of BMI and depressive symptoms is bi-directional among older adults, and it appears to be affected by both age and sex.

  • 5.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Cohort differences in longitudinal change in functional ability2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality of life in late adulthood is a function of physical, emotional, and intellectual health, and maintenance of functional ability is central to sustaining independent living. Generational differences in health behaviors and health care may result in differences in how functional ability changes with age. Cohort differences in rates of decline would provide support for environmental or behavioral influences on aging of physical functioning.

    Method: Twenty assessments of functional ability were collected as part of the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging from twins aged 50–88 at the first wave. Participants completed up to 7 assessments covering a 21-year period. Factor analysis was used to create 3 factors: flexibility, fine motor skills, and balance. Individuals born 1900-1924 (N=441) were compared with individuals born 1925-1948 (N=418).

    Results: Latent growth curve modeling incorporating two linear slopes was used to compare rates of decline between the two cohorts. For the early born cohort, slopes assessed change from 60-80 (slope 1) and 80-95 (slope 2); for the later born cohort, slopes assessed changes from 50-60 and 60-80. The balance and flexibility factors showed equivalent increase in difficulty in functioning in the overlapping age range (age 60-80); however, difficulties in fine motor skills increased faster in the later born cohort in that age range.

    Conclusions: Cohort differences in experiences have modest impact on increases in difficulty in physical functioning; generally, aging of physical functioning is occurring at the same pace for two distinct cohorts, providing support for internal mechanisms of decline.

  • 6.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Genetic and Environmental Influences on Functional Ability in the Second Half of Life2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Longitudinal relationships between cognitive and functional aging2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, United States.
    Andel, Ross
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, United States.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gender Differences in Longitudinal Trajectories of Change in Physical, Social, and Cognitive/Sedentary Leisure Activities2018In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 73, no 8, p. 1491-1500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We examined changes in participation in cognitive, social, and physical leisure activities across middle and older adulthood and tested moderation of trajectories of change in participation by gender.

    Method: In all, 1,398 participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA) completed a 7-item leisure activity questionnaire up to 4 times over 17 years. Mean baseline age was 64.9 years (range = 36-91); 59% were women. Factor analysis identifed physical, social, and cognitive/sedentary leisure activity participation factors. Age-based latent growth curve models adjusted for marital status, gender, education, depressive symptoms, and physical health were used.

    Results: Overall, results indicated stability in social activities, increase in cognitive/sedentary activities, and decrease in physical activities, as well as accelerated decline in all three types of activities after about the age of 70 years. Social activity remained mostly stable for women and declined for men. Women reported higher levels of cognitive/sedentary leisure activity across the study. Both men and women declined in physical leisure activity. Variance in leisure activities increased with age; men demonstrated more variance in social activities and women in physical activities.

    Conclusions: Understanding change in leisure activities with age and by gender can have important implications for interventions and for use of leisure activity data in epidemiological research. 

  • 9.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Emery, Charles F.
    Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Evidence of bi-directional associations between depressive symptoms and body mass among older adults2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Age changes in lung function precede and contribute to subsequent age changes in motor function and cognition2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Cohort By Education Differences In Longitudinal Change In Functional Ability2018In: Innovation in Aging, ISSN 1556-343X, Vol. 2, no suppl_1, p. 477-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life in late adulthood is a function of physical, emotional, and intellectual health, and maintenance of functional ability is central to sustaining independent living. Generational differences in health behaviors and health care may result in differences in how functional ability changes with age. Twenty assessments of functional ability were collected as part of the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging from twins aged 50–88 at the first wave. Participants completed up to 9 assessments covering a 26-year period. Factor analysis was used to create 3 factors: flexibility, fine motor skills, and balance. Individuals born 1900–1924 (N=441) were compared with individuals born 1925–1948 (N=418). Latent growth curve modeling indicated accelerating changes with age for all 3 factors in both cohorts, but difficulties in motor function increased at a significantly slower pace in the later born cohort. Education was added to the LGCM as an indicator of socio-economic conditions: lower education (elementary school) vs. higher education. Sixty-nine percent of the earlier born cohort and 50% of the later born cohort had only elementary school education. Adding education to the LGCM had no impact on rates of change in the early born cohort. In the later born cohort, however, individuals with less education had the same aging trajectories as the earlier born cohort. That is, only later born individuals with higher educational achievement showed the slower rate of aging of functional abilities. Results demonstrate the SES distinction in the impact of health improvements over the 20th century.

  • 12.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Cohort by Education Interactions in Longitudinal Changes in Functional Abilities2020In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 32, no 3-4, p. 208-215, article id 898264318814108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Investigations of cohort differences in relationships between education and health tend to focus on mortality or self-reported health. We report one of the first analyses of cohort differences in relationships between education and objective measures of functional abilities across the lifespan.

    METHOD: Up to 26 years of follow-up data were available from 859 adults from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The sample was divided into two cohorts by birth year: 1900-1924 and 1925-1948. Latent growth curve models (LGCM) were compared across cohort and educational levels.

    RESULTS: LGCM indicated divergence between adults with lower and higher educational attainment in longitudinal trajectories of change with age in the Balance and Flexibility factors for the later born cohort only.

    DISCUSSION: Results support the cumulative advantage theory and suggest that education-health disparities are increasing in recent cohorts, even in counties with national health care systems and strong support of education.

  • 13.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana Univ Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Genetic influences on lung function contribute to subsequent age changes in motor and cognitive function2019In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 492-492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Role of motor function and lung function in pathways to ageing and decline2020In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Extensive research has investigated the association between age changes in various domains, including lung function and motor function. However, a few analyses have tested models that incorporate bidirectional longitudinal influences between lung and motor function to test the temporal chain of events in the disability process. Dual change score models (DCSM) assist with identification of leading indicators of change by leveraging longitudinal data to examine the extent to which changes in one variable influence subsequent changes in a second variable, and vice versa.

    Aims

    The purpose of the current-analysis study was to apply DCSM to data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of ageing to examine the nature of the longitudinal relationship between motor functioning and lung function.

    Methods

    Three motor functioning factors were created from 20 performance measures, including measures of balance, flexibility, and fine motor skills. Peak expiratory flow measured lung function. Participants were 829 adults aged 50–88 at the first of 9 waves of testing covering a 27-year follow-up period; 80% participated in at least three waves.

    Results

    Model comparisons indicated that decline in lung function preceded and contributed to subsequent decline in motor function.

    Discussion

    Combined with previous results, these results suggest that declining lung function results in increasing difficulties in motor function, which contribute to subsequent declines in multiple domains.

    Conclusion

    Understanding the cascade of events that can lead to dependence can help in the development of interventions targeted early in the disablement process.

  • 15.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany.
    Franz, Carol E.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Christensen, Kaare
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Longitudinal twin study of subjective health: Differences in genetic and environmental components of variance across age and sex2020In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The current analysis examines sex differences in longitudinal changes in genetic and environmental influences on three measures of subjective health.

    Method: Sample includes 7372 twins (mean intake age = 73.22) with up to 8 waves of measurement (mean = 3.1). Three subjective health (SH) items were included: general self-rated health (SRH), health compared to age peers (COMP), and impact of health on activities (ACT) which previous research shows capture different frames of reference.

    Results: Latent growth curve modeling indicated significant differences across gender and frame of reference in trajectories of change with age and in genetic and environmental contributions to change. Men have higher mean scores on all three SH measures, indicating better SH, but there were no sex differences in pattern of change with age. Accelerating declines with age were found for SRH and ACT, whereas COMP improved with age. Results indicated more genetic variance for women than men, but declining genetic variance for both after age 70. Increasing shared environmental variance with increasing age was also found for both sexes.

    Discussion: As aging triggers a re-evaluation of the meaning of "good health," physical aspects of health may become less important and shared cultural conceptions of health may become more relevant. This change in conceptions of good health may reflect both aging and the change in composition of the elderly population as a result of selective survival.

  • 16.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Johansson, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral health predicts quality of life in data from Swedish National Quality Registries2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Financial strain moderates genetic influences on self-reported health: Support for social compensation model2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existence of genetic influences on both health and SES attainment suggests that GE interplay plays a role in SES-health associations. Adverse environments raise the risk of disease for everyone, but various models of GE interplay predict that some genotypes are more vulnerable to adversity than others (diathesis-stress), enriched environments prevent the expression of an underlying genetic vulnerability (social compensation), or genetic factors are minimized in adverse environments and maximized in favorable ones (social enhancement). Differential susceptibility models propose that specific genotypes might be more responsive to the social environment at both positive and negative extremes. Nine of the 15 twin studies of adult development and aging that are part of the IGEMS consortium included items assessing financial strain as well as subjective health, representing 10,756 individuals. The sample was 55% women, included 3185 MZ twins and 5228 DZ twins, and age ranged from 24 to 98. A factor model was used to create a harmonized measure of financial strain across studies and items: extent to which money covers needs, difficulty in paying monthly bills, economic situation compared to others, and whether there is money for extras. Twin analysis of genetic and environmental variance for self-rated health incorporating age and financial strain as continuous moderators and sex as a dichotomous moderator indicated significant financial strain moderation of genetic influences on self-rated health. Genetic variance increased as financial strain increased, matching the predictions of the diathesis-stress and social comparison models for components of variance.

  • 18.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ram, N.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Longitudinal changes in within-person fluctuation in mood as a marker of decline2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Schwartz, E.
    Diversity of day-to-day emotional experiences and social interactions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, Indiana.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jylhävä, Juulia
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bai, Ge
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,and Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA .
    Functional Aging Index Complements Frailty in Prediction of Entry into Care and Mortality.2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 1980-1986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to develop a functional aging index (FAI) that taps four body systems: sensory (vision and hearing), pulmonary, strength (grip strength), and movement/balance (gait speed) and to test the predictive value of FAI for entry into care and mortality.

    METHOD: Growth curve models and cox regression models were applied to data from 1695 individuals from three Swedish longitudinal studies of aging. Participants were aged 45 to 93 at intake and data from up to 8 follow-up waves were available.

    RESULTS: The rate of change in FAI was twice as fast after age 75 as before, women demonstrated higher mean FAI, but no sex differences in rates of change with chronological age were identified. FAI predicted entry into care and mortality, even when chronological age and a frailty index were included in the models. Hazard ratios indicated FAI was a more important predictor of entry into care for men than women; whereas it was a stronger predictor of mortality for men than women.

    CONCLUSIONS: Measures of biological aging and functional aging differ in their predictive value for entry into care and mortality for men and women, suggesting that both are necessary for a complete picture of the aging process across genders.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-19 00:01
  • 21.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Functional biological age as marker of systemic aging processes2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Zavala, C.
    Sex differences in financial strain moderation of genetic influences on subjective health2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fransson, EIeonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). School of Social Sciences, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 74, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up.

    METHOD:

    A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Health and social care in the most ill older persons2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Jylhävä, J.
    et al.
    Raymond, E.
    Reynolds, C.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ericsson, M.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Hägg, S.
    Pedersen, N.
    Drivers of frailty from adulthood into old age: Results from a 27-year longitudinal population-based study in Sweden2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Darin-Mattsson, A.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). School of Social Sciences, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Wilińska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Psychological distress, mental illness, and mood fluctuations in old age – causes and consequences2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Li, Xia
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ploner, Alexander
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yunzhang
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Patrik Ke
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jylhävä, Juulia
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägg, Sara
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Longitudinal trajectories, correlations and mortality associations of nine biological ages across 20-years follow-up.2020In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 9, article id e51507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological age measurements (BAs) assess aging-related physiological change and predict health risks among individuals of the same chronological age (CA). Multiple BAs have been proposed and are well studied individually but not jointly. We included 845 individuals and 3973 repeated measurements from a Swedish population-based cohort and examined longitudinal trajectories, correlations, and mortality associations of nine BAs across 20 years follow-up. We found the longitudinal growth of functional BAs accelerated around age 70; average levels of BA curves differed by sex across the age span (50-90 years). All BAs were correlated to varying degrees; correlations were mostly explained by CA. Individually, all BAs except for telomere length were associated with mortality risk independently of CA. The largest effects were seen for methylation age estimators (GrimAge) and the frailty index (FI). In joint models, two methylation age estimators (Horvath and GrimAge) and FI remained predictive, suggesting they are complementary in predicting mortality.

  • 28.
    Nyman, Rosita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Living urban or rural in late adulthood ... What is important and what is the difference? 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Finch, Brian K
    Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, United States.
    Butler, David A.
    Office of Military and Veterans Health, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC, United States.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Franz, Carol E.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San diego, CA, United States.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Department of Public Health,Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lapham, Susan
    Research and Evaluation, American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC, United States.
    McGue, Matt
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
    Mosing, Miriam A.
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Neiderhiser, Jenae
    Department of Psychology, Penn State University, University Park, PA, United States.
    Nygaard, Marianne
    Danish Twin Registry, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark.
    Panizzon, Matthew
    Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San diego, CA, United States.
    Prescott, Carol A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States.
    Sachdev, Perminder
    Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Whitfield, Keith E.
    Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, United States.
    IGEMS: The Consortium on Interplay of Genes and Environment Across Multiple Studies - An Update2019In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 809-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) is a consortium of 18 twin studies from 5 different countries (Sweden, Denmark, Finland, United States, and Australia) established to explore the nature of gene-environment (GE) interplay in functioning across the adult lifespan. Fifteen of the studies are longitudinal, with follow-up as long as 59 years after baseline. The combined data from over 76,000 participants aged 14-103 at intake (including over 10,000 monozygotic and over 17,000 dizygotic twin pairs) support two primary research emphases: (1) investigation of models of GE interplay of early life adversity, and social factors at micro and macro environmental levels and with diverse outcomes, including mortality, physical functioning and psychological functioning; and (2) improved understanding of risk and protective factors for dementia by incorporating unmeasured and measured genetic factors with a wide range of exposures measured in young adulthood, midlife and later life.

  • 30.
    Zammit, Andrea R
    et al.
    Saul B. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY..
    Piccinin, Andrea M
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    Duggan, Emily C
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    Koval, Andriy
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    Clouston, Sean
    Department of Family, Population and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY..
    Robitaille, Annie
    Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada..
    Brown, Cassandra L
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    Handschuh, Philipp
    Ulm University, Department of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University..
    Wu, Chenkai
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China..
    Jarry, Valérie
    Research Center on Aging, Integrated Academic Health Center and Social Services in the Eastern Townships, Sherbrooke, Canada..
    Finkel, Deborah
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN..
    Graham, Raquel B
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
    Centre for Dementia Prevention, University of Edinburgh..
    Björk, Marcus Praetorius
    Department of Psychology and Centre for Ageing and Health, AgeCap, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bennett, David
    Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center..
    Deeg, Dorly J
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, In Amsterdam, the Netherlands..
    Johansson, Boo
    Department of Psychology and Centre for Ageing and Health, AgeCap, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Katz, Mindy J
    Saul B. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY..
    Kaye, Jeffrey
    Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR..
    Lipton, Richard B
    Saul B. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY..
    Martin, Mike
    Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland..
    Pederson, Nancy L
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spiro, Avron
    Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA..
    Zimprich, Daniel
    Ulm University, Department of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University..
    Hofer, Scott M
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC..
    A coordinated multi-study analysis of the longitudinal association between handgrip strength and cognitive function in older adults.2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, article id gbz072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Handgrip strength, an indicator of overall muscle strength, has been found to be associated with slower rate of cognitive decline and decreased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. However, evaluating the replicability of associations between aging-related changes in physical and cognitive functioning is challenging due to differences in study designs and analytical models. A multiple-study coordinated analysis approach was used to generate new longitudinal results based on comparable construct-level measurements and identical statistical models and to facilitate replication and research synthesis.

    METHODS: We performed coordinated analysis on nine cohort studies affiliated with the Integrative Analysis of Longitudinal Studies of Aging and Dementia (IALSA) research network. Bivariate linear mixed models were used to examine associations among individual differences in baseline level, rate of change, and occasion-specific variation across grip strength and indicators of cognitive function, including mental status, processing speed, attention and working memory, perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, and learning and memory. Results were summarized using meta-analysis.

    RESULTS: After adjustment for covariates, we found an overall moderate association between change in grip strength and change in each cognitive domain for both males and females: Average correlation coefficient was 0.55 (95% CI = 0.44 - 0.56). We also found a high level of heterogeneity in this association across studies.

    DISCUSSION: Meta-analytic results from nine longitudinal studies showed consistently positive associations between linear rates of change in grip strength and changes in cognitive functioning. Future work will benefit from the examination of individual patterns of change to understand the heterogeneity in rates of aging and health-related changes across physical and cognitive biomarkers.

1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf