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  • 1. Axelson, Mattias
    et al.
    Netz, Joakim
    Stockholms universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Sandström, Christian
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Collective action problems in public sector innovation: A business model perspective2017In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 370-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore how the literature on business models can explain the outcomes of innovation attempts in the public sector. Our findings suggest that governments can access a well-developed knowledge domain for a public sector area but have a weak ability to propagate its value for society. Drawing on the business model literature concerning interdependence and distributed agency, we illustrate how a collective action problem related to innovation may arise in the public sector. We illustrate this new category of public innovation challenge with the (failed) case of the Swedish civil contingencies system and subsequently discuss a new line of inquiry for future research.

  • 2. Axelsson, M.
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    Dynamic National Capability: Insights from astudy of Innovation of Homeland Security2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bergkvist, John-Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Third-Generation Innovation Policy: System Transformation or Reinforcing Business as Usual?2022In: Questioning the Entrepreneurial State: Status-quo, Pitfalls, and the Need for Credible Innovation Policy / [ed] Karl Wennberg & Christian Sandström, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 201-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a shift in innovation policy in recent years toward more focus on systemic transformation and changed directionality. In this chapter, we describe a collection of challenges that such policies need to address. Based on a review of dominant frameworks regarding socio-technical transitions, we compare these theories with examples of innovation policy in different countries. Systemic transformation across an economy usually requires a process of creative destruction in which new competencies may be required, actors need to be connected in novel ways, and institutions may need to be changed. Our empirical illustrations show that support programs and initiatives across Europe do not always seem to result in such a process, as they include mechanisms favoring large, established firms and universities. These actors have often fine-tuned their activities and capabilities to the existing order, and therefore have few incentives to engage in renewal. As the incumbent actors also control superior financial and relational resources, there is a risk that they captivate innovation policies and thus reinforce established structures rather than contributing to systemic transformation.

  • 4. Berglund, H.
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    A New Perspective on the Innovator’s Dilemma – Exploring the Role of Entrepreneurial Incentives2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Berglund, H.
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    Technological discontinuities and the incumbent’s curse – entrant firms as institutional entrepreneurs2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Berglund, Henrik
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Björkdahl, Joakim
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Börjesson, Sofia
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Elmquist, Maria
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Hjerpe, Jonas
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Sjölander, Sören
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Elerud-Tryde, Anne
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Wickenberg, Jan
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    CBIs studie om innovationsledning2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    CBI har under andra halvåret 2010 och första halvåret 2011 genomfört en studie av innovationsledning hos 38 utvalda svenska företag inom tillverkning, IT och Telekom. Syftet var att undersöka hur företagen leder och organiserar innovation samt vilka utmaningar de står inför. Frågorna har besvarats av antingen VD eller en medlem i ledningsgruppen med insyn i företagets hantering av innovation.

    Resultatet visar att

    -de flesta företagen inte skiljer på radikal och inkrementell innovation

    -i många företag används ordet innovation för all produkt- och tjänsteutveckling

    -de flesta företag ser en ökning av innovationstakten inom sin respektive bransch

    -de flesta företag uttrycker att innovation är viktigt, samtidigt som få företag har innovationsfrågor bland sina tre största utmaningar

    -hälften av företagen använder någon form av rutin för att stärka sin förmåga att skapa nya produkter och tjänster, men endast ett fåtal använder flera olika rutiner

    -förstainnovationsföretagen (mindre, relativt nystartade företag) skiljer sig från de övriga i det att de är starkt innovationscentrerade

    -många företag välkomnar stöd från akademin, men endast ett fåtal önskar stöd att öka sin innovationsförmågaCBIs samtliga seniora forskare har genomfört intervjuerna.

  • 7.
    Berglund, Henrik
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    A new perspective on the innovator's dilemma-exploring the role of entrepreneurial incentives2017In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 75, no 1-4, p. 142-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do entrant firms sometimes gain the upper hand under conditions of discontinuous technological change? Previous research on this topic has either looked at the role of established competencies and/or firm incentives to invest in a new technology. In this paper we explore an alternative explanation. Drawing upon evidence from the ongoing transition from CCTV to digital, IP-based video surveillance, we argue that entrant firms may be more prone to act entrepreneurially, i.e., more inclined to proactively create or transform markets and build ecosystems. As new technologies frequently require altered behaviour among customers and stakeholders, this capability is sometimes critical in order to succeed in a technological transition. Our contribution therefore lies in pointing out that not only may incentives to allocate R&D resources differ among entrants and incumbents, firms might also have different incentives to engage in entrepreneurial activities of creating or transforming markets. 

  • 8.
    Berglund, Henrik
    et al.
    Center for Business Innovation, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Center for Business Innovation, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Business model innovation from an open systems perspective: Structural challenges and managerial solutions2013In: International Journal of Product Development, ISSN 1477-9056, E-ISSN 1741-8178, Vol. 18, no 3-4, p. 274-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an emerging consensus that business models are systemic and transcend firm boundaries. Yet, existing research on Business Model Innovation (BMI) challenges focus almost exclusively on intra-firm factors such as capabilities, cognition and leadership. We explore challenges related to BMI by instead drawing on an open systems perspective on organisations. In particular, we argue that the systemic and boundary-spanning nature of business models imply that firms are forced to act under conditions of interdependence and restricted freedom, since they do not have executive control over their surrounding network. Consequently, we propose that suitable managerial solutions include the development of shared knowledge, appropriability regimes based on trust, network stability and the alignment of heterogeneous interests. 

  • 9. Berglund, Henrik
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    Magnusson, Mats
    Symmetric Assumptions in the Theory of Disruptive Innovation: Theoretical & Managerial Implications2012In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2012, No. 1, Academy of Management , 2012, article id 16200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on disruptive innovation has successfully explained why firms often encounter problems under conditions of discontinuous change. It states that incumbent firms fail to invest in new technologies when these are not demanded by their existing market, due to forces of resource dependency and the associated assumption that customers control firms’ internal resource allocation processes. While the problem of disruptive innovation has been convincingly described, there is still a need for managerial solutions. We argue that a main reason why such solutions are lacking can be found in the asymmetric assumptions made in the original theory of disruptive innovation. Specifically, the focal firm is treated as a collection of heterogeneous actors with different preferences, incentives and competencies, whereas firms in the surrounding environment are treated as if they contained no such heterogeneity. A consequence, the theory on disruptive innovation has described incumbents as controlled by their environment, but has failed to recognize that the environment can also be influenced. In this paper we argue that a more symmetric theory of disruptive innovation – i.e. one that treats all similar entities in the same way – raises opens up for a range of interesting managerial solutions to the innovator’s dilemma.

  • 10.
    Broström, A.
    et al.
    Division of Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    McKelvey, M.
    Industrial Management, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Elite European universities and the R&D subsidiaries of multinational enterprises2009In: Learning to compete in European universities: From social institution to knowledge business / [ed] M. McKelvey & M. Holmén, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2009, p. 251-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mckelvey, Maureen
    School of Business, Law and Economics, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Investing in localized relationships with universities: What are the benefits for R&D subsidiaries of multinational enterprises?2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of a long-standing interest in the distribution of knowledge spillovers from university research, there is only limited theoretical understanding of if and when opportunities to interact with a research university constitute a significant force of attraction for globally mobile investment in R&D. Based on an empirical investigation of the benefits of interaction with universities, this paper proposes an analytical framework and four ideal types of strategy for localised collaboration between R&D subsidiaries and universities. This taxonomy, which largely transcends industry sectors, and the illustrative cases presented in this paper provide insights into the potential scope for localised university-industry interaction from the perspective of multinational enterprises. By connecting the empirical results to the question whether these benefits are significant enough to enhance a region's attractiveness as a location for R&D, we are able to develop a better understanding of the alternative strategies for policymakers and university leaders interested in stimulating such linkages. 

  • 12.
    Collin, Elias
    et al.
    School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evaluating Evaluations of Innovation Policy: Exploring Reliability, Methods, and Conflicts of Interest2022In: Questioning the Entrepreneurial State: Status-quo, Pitfalls, and the Need for Credible Innovation Policy / [ed] Karl Wennberg & Christian Sandström, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 157-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expansions of innovation policies have been paralleled with an increase in the evaluations of such policies. Yet, there are few systematic evaluations of how such evaluations are conducted, by whom, and their overall conclusions. We analyze 110 evaluations of innovation policy in Sweden from 2005 to 2019. Our findings show that the majority of these evaluations are positive, about one-third are neutral in their conclusions, and very few are negative. The majority of evaluations were conducted by consulting firms, close to one-third by expert government agencies, and around 10% by university researchers or as self-evaluations by the governmental agencies responsible for the policy themselves. Few evaluations employed causal methods to assess the potential effects of policies. We discuss conflicts of interest and question the reliability of evaluations of innovation policy.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Klas
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernkvist, Mirko
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    A revised perspective on innovation policy for renewal of mature economies – Historical evidence from finance and telecommunications in Sweden 1980–19902019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 147, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the role of innovation policy for accomplishing renewal of mature industries in Western economies? Drawing upon an unusually rich dataset spanning 9752 digitized archival documents, we categorize and code decisions taken by policymakers on several levels while also mapping and quantifying the strategic activities of both entrant firms and incumbent monopolists over a decade. Our data concerns two empirical cases from Sweden during the time period 1980–1990: the financial sector and the telecommunications sector. In both industries, a combination of technological and institutional upheaval came into motion during this time period which in turn fueled the revitalization of the Swedish economy in the subsequent decades. Our findings show that Swedish policymakers in both cases consistently acted in order to promote the emergence of more competition and de novo entrant firms at the expense of established monopolies. The paper quantifies and documents this process while also highlighting several enabling conditions. In conclusion, the results indicate that successful innovation policy in mature economies is largely a matter of strategically dealing with resourceful vested interest groups, alignment of expectations, and removing resistance to industrial renewal. 

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Sandström, Christian
    Ratio and Chalmers University of Technology.
    How can an entrant firm dismantle a government monopoly?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Geissinger, A.
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation, Box 6501, Stockholm, SE-113 83, Sweden.
    Laurell, C.
    Einride, Regeringsgatan 65, Stockholm, SE-111 56, Sweden.
    Öberg, C.
    Karlstad University, CTF Service Research Center, Karlstad, SE-651 88, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 3203, Stockholm, SE-103 64, Sweden.
    Social media analytics for innovation management research: A systematic literature review and future research agenda2023In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 123, article id 102712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New trends in innovation management may require new research methods. Social media analytics (SMA)—a method for capturing and analyzing data from user-generated content published on online platforms—has emerged as a complement or even alternative to more traditional research methods. This article systematically reviews and assesses the use of SMA and its potential for innovation management research. Our results show that use of SMA is still in an emergent phase, although it has become increasingly popular over the past decade. Our literature review illustrates that SMA provides new opportunities for innovation management scholars to enhance customer-, market-, technology-, and society-focused innovation research in several ways. In this paper we develop a research agenda and suggest areas for future research using SMA in innovation management.

  • 16.
    Geissinger, A.
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Sweden.
    Laurell, C.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Economics and Management Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics and Entrepreneurship (SIDE) Division, Sweden.
    Öberg, C.
    Örebro University School of Business, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Organization, Leadership, Strategy and Entrepreneurship. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The sharing economy as an entrepreneurial evolution of electronic commerce2021In: Digital Entrepreneurship and the Sharing Economy / [ed] E. Vinogradov, B. Leick & D. Assadi, Taylor and Francis , 2021, 1, p. 72-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Orebro Univ Sch Business, Orebro, Sweden.;Ratio Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laurell, Christofer
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Ind Econ & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oberg, Christina
    Orebro Univ, Orebro Univ Sch Business, Orebro, Sweden.;Ratio Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Organization, Leadership, Strategy and Entrepreneurship. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    University of Newcastle, Newcastle Business School, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    The sharing economy and the transformation of work: evidence from Foodora2022In: Personnel review, ISSN 0048-3486, E-ISSN 1758-6933, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 584-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the transformation of work.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Applying social media analytics (SMA) concerning the sharing economy platform Foodora, a total of 3,251 user-generated content was collected and organised throughout the social media landscape in Sweden over 12 months, and 18 stakeholder groups were identified, discussing digital work within seven thematic categories.

    Findings

    The results show that the stakeholder groups in the Swedish context primarily expressed negative views of Foodora's way of organising digital work. The social media posts outlined the distributive and procedural justice related to the working conditions, boycott and protests and critical incidents, as well as the collective bargaining of Foodora.

    Originality/value

    By utilising a novel SMA method, this study contributes to the extant literature on the sharing economy by providing a systematic assessment concerning the impact of the sharing economy platform on the transformation of work and the associated social consequences.

  • 18.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Digital Disruption beyond Uber and Airbnb—Tracking the long tail of the sharing economy2018In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, article id 119323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy can be regarded as a discontinuous innovation that creates increased abundance throughout society. Extant literature on the sharing economy has been predominantly concerned with Uber and Airbnb. As little is known about where the sharing economy is gaining momentum beyond transportation and accommodation, the purpose of this paper is to map in what sectors of the economy it is perceived to gain traction. Drawing on data from social and traditional media in Sweden, we identify a long tail of 17 sectors and 47 subsectors in which a total of 165 unique sharing-economy actors operate, including sectors such as on-demand services, fashion and clothing, and food delivery. Our findings therefore point at the expanding scope of the sharing economy and relatedly, we derive a set of implications for firms.

  • 19.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden, & The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Klas
    Department of economic history, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    School of Business, Örebro University, and The Ratio Institute, Örebro, Sweden.
    Digital entrepreneurship and field conditions for institutional change – Investigating the enabling role of cities2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 146, p. 877-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital entrepreneurship may result in institutional turbulence and new initiatives are frequently blocked by vested interest groups who posit superior financial and relational resources. In this paper, we explore the role of cities in facilitating digital entrepreneurship and overcoming institutional resistance to innovation. Drawing upon two historical case studies of digital entrepreneurship in the city of Stockholm along with an extensive material on the sharing economy in Sweden, our results suggest that cities offer an environment that is critical for digital entrepreneurship. The economic and technological diversity of a city may provide the field conditions required for institutional change to take place and to avoid regulatory capture.

  • 20.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden, & The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden, & The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Science and Technology Studies, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, & The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Assessing the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce2020In: ISPIM Conference Proceedings, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the sharing economy on ways in which online commerce is evolving. By utilising Social Media Analytics to systematically track the developments of the sharing economy visà-vis online commerce, we analyse an empirical material of 8,755 user-generated content covering a time period of 24 months. Our findings illustrate that the sharing economy fuels platforms focusing attention to sharing commerce but also platforms engaged in social commerce and more general forms of e-commerce. Furthermore, our findings show the sectors in which sharing commerce, social commerce and general forms of e-commerce have become particularly prevalent. The paper contributes to previous literature by providing a systematic empirical contribution on the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce and by conceptually explaining why the sharing economy gives rise to a relatively wide plethora of online commerce initiatives.

  • 21.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How sustainable is the sharing economy? On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

  • 22.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Center for Sports and Business, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Chalmers University of Technology.
    Tracking the institutional logics of the sharing economy2019In: Handbook of the sharing economy / [ed] R. W. Belk, G. M. Eckhardt & F. Bardhi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 177-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23. Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Öberg, Christina
    Sandström, Christian
    Sick, Nathalie
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Institutional Change at the Sharing Economy's Fringes: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Center for Sports and Business, Stockholm School of Economics, Institute of Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
    Assessing user perceptions of the interplay between the sharing, access, platform and community‐based economies2020In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 1037-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Digitally intermediated peer-to-peer exchanges have accelerated in occurrence, and as a consequence, they have introduced an increased pluralism of connotations. Accordingly, this paper aims to assess user perceptions of the interplay between the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies.

    Design/methodology/approach: The sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies have been systematically tracked in the social media landscape using Social Media Analytics (SMA). In doing so, a total material of 62,855 publicly posted user-generated content concerning the four respective economies were collected and analyzed.

    Findings: Even though the sharing economy has been conceptually argued to be interlinked with the access, platform, and community-based economies, the empirical results of the study do not validate this interlinkage. Instead, the results regarding user perceptions in social media show that the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies manifest as clearly separated.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to existing literature by offering an empirical validation, as well as an in-depth understanding, of the sharing economy's interlinkage to other economies, along with the extent to which the overlaps between these economies manifest in social media. 

  • 25.
    Grafström, Jonas
    et al.
    Ratio, Oxford Institute for Energy Studies; och Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Paulson, Rasmus
    Ratio; och Lunds universitet.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio.
    Wieslander, Axel
    Ratio; och Handelshögskolan i Göteborg.
    Tillväxt och hållbar utveckling i Sverige – fick Lindbeck (1974) rätt?2020In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 64-69Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Grafström, Jonas
    et al.
    Ratio, Oxford Institute for Energy Studies; och Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio.
    Mer för mindre?: Tillväxt och hållbarhet i Sverige2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Baksidestext:

    Går det att förena ekonomisk tillväxt med hållbar utveckling? Den här boken beskriver hur miljöskadliga utsläpp och användningen av naturresurser i Sverige har förändrats över tid.

    Sedan 1990 har Sveriges befolkning ökat med drygt 1,6 miljoner och ekonomin nästan fördubblats. Samtidigt har koldioxidutsläppen minskat med 27 procent mellan åren 1990 och 2018, konsumtionen av el, vatten och energi har stått still vilket innebär att ekonomin är nästan dubbelt så effektiv. Av de 26 luftföroreningar Naturvårdsverket mätt sedan 1990 har 24 gått ner fram till 2017. I många fall har det skett mer än en halvering.

  • 27. Gustafsson, Robin
    et al.
    Ernkvist, Mirko
    Sandström, Christian
    Lakomaa, Erik
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Cheung, Zeerim
    Towards an integrative digital history approach in organization studies2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings: Vol. 2016, No. 1, Academy of Management , 2016, article id 18182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in digitizing of historical data and advances in software tools for structured analysis of digitized historical data, are creating opportunities to unleash previously untapped ways to use historical data. We build on recent suggestions for methodological integration, for outlining an integrative digital history approach, with the methodological rigor to unleash creative synthesis of business history and organization studies. Methodological integration constitutes an inter-meshing of methods that takes place already from the outset of the research process and remains so throughout the collection of sources, interpretation and analysis. This places at the center a careful research design with a relational database for the collection and digitizing of data, structuring and coding of historical sources, historical interpretation, and analytics to be used. We outline key design issues, steps and processes for an integrative digital history approach. Following, we present the strengths of this approach in comparison to existing ‘analog’ business history and organizational studies methods. We end the paper by discussing future avenues and opportunities for digital history.

  • 28.
    Ingram Bogusz, Claire
    et al.
    House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Division of Science, Technology and Society, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; and Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Tracking the digital evolution of entrepreneurial finance: The interplay between crowdfunding, blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and initial coin offerings2020In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 1099-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A vibrant development is currently taking place in entrepreneurial finance due to the field's digital evolution over recent years. This article aims to assess the interplay between four of the key phenomena that has fuelled this development, namely crowdfunding, blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and initial coin offerings (ICOs). By making use of social media analytics, public discussions on social media concerning crowdfunding, blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and ICOs have been systematically tracked in social media over three time periods between the May 6, 2017, and October 2, 2018. In doing so, a total of 197 770 captured posts across social media platforms have been collected and analyzed. The results illustrate that discussions on blockchain technologies dominated the interplay in the first analyzed time period, that discussions on cryptocurrencies and ICOs dominated the interplay in the second analyzed time period, while discussions concerning blockchain technologies, cryptocurrencies, and ICOs highly converge in the third time period. By illustrating this shift over the analyzed time periods and by offering a systematic exploration of key characteristics of the interplay at hand, this article adds to previous literature on entrepreneurial finance by providing an empirical contribution which details the coevolution of these phenomena in recent years.

  • 29. Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    Curing the incumbent curse - Investing in discontinuous innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Johnson, Prince Chacko
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Laurell, C.
    Einride, Regeringsgatan 65, Stockholm, 11156, Sweden.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Digital innovation and the effects of artificial intelligence on firms’ research and development – Automation or augmentation, exploration or exploitation?2022In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 179, article id 121636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization has altered many assumptions underpinning research on innovation management. At the early innings of exploring how digital innovation management stands out, there is a need for further studies in this area. Previous research on how firms use artificial intelligence has distinguished between automation and augmentation of human activities. In this paper, we explore how firms implement artificial intelligence within research and development. Utilizing an international news database spanning 956 articles from 122 newspapers published in 2020, we find that artificial intelligence is primarily adopted to augment human activities (55%) within research and development, rather than to automate matters (11%). We observe differences across sectors where automation is more common in government, information and communication technology (ICT), and technology and software. Our systematic coding shows that artificial intelligence is primarily adopted for exploration research and development (64%), rather than exploitation (5%). Based on these findings, we conclude that research and development from artificial intelligence primarily focuses on novel markets and areas of operations, rather than enhancing existing product markets and activities. Moreover, it augments human labor rather than replaces it; hence, job losses related to artificial intelligence do not seem to be taking place within research and development.

  • 31.
    Johnson, Prince Chacko
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Making use of digital methods to study influencer marketing2022In: The dynamics of influencer marketing: A multidisciplinary approach / [ed] J. M. Álvarez-Monzoncillo, London: Routledge, 2022, p. 5-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influencer marketing is presently gaining momentum across the economy. Digital data and digital methods hold potential for further advancing research on influencer marketing, and presently more knowledge is needed concerning how online sources and digital methods can be used for this purpose. In this chapter, we describe how digital data and digital methods can be applied in order to study influencer marketing. Social Media Analytics enables systematic real-time collection of data across different social media platforms. Making use of such data and analysing it using various software opens up several research opportunities related to influencer marketing. We highlight some of these benefits and discuss how these methods can be put into practice.

  • 32.
    Karlson, Nils
    et al.
    Ratio Institute Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio Institute Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Division of Business Administration, Linköping University, Sweden; Ratio institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bureaucrats or Markets in Innovation Policy? – a critique of the entrepreneurial state2021In: The Review of Austrian Economics, ISSN 0889-3047, E-ISSN 1573-7128, Vol. 34, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes stock of recent suggestions that the state apparatus is a central and underappreciated actor in the generation, diffusion and exploitation of innovations enhancing growth and social welfare. We contrast such a view of “the entrepreneurial state” with theories and empirical evidence of the microeconomic processes of innovation in the modern economy which focus on well-functioning markets, free entry and competition among firms, and independent entrepreneurship as central mechanisms in the creation and dissemination of innovations. In doing so, we identify several deficiencies in the notion of an entrepreneurial state by showing that (i) there is weak empirical support in the many hundreds empirical studies and related meta analyses evaluating the effectiveness of active industrial and innovative policies, that (ii) these policies do not take account of the presence of information and incentive problems which together explain why attempts to address purported market failures often result in policy failures, and that (iii) the exclusive focus on knowledge creation through R&D and different forms of firm subsidies ignores the equally important mechanisms of knowledge dissemination and creation through commercial exploitation in markets. We discuss how a more theoretically well-founded focus on the state as investing in knowledge generation and securing the conditions of free and competitive markets will lead to a more innovative economy. 

  • 33.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Science and Technology Studies, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, The Ratio Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Comparing coverage of disruptive change in social and traditional media: Evidence from the sharing economy2018In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 129, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media differ from traditional media in their coverage of disruptive technological change? We explore how two entrants transforming the personal transportation and accommodation sectors are covered in social and traditional media. Using content analysis, we conclude that these two forms of media differ substantially. Traditional media is focused on how the two entrants affect society and their respective sectors at large, whilst social media instead function as accelerators for the entrants as they receive predominantly positive coverage. Therefore, our findings suggest that the rise of social media may accelerate the growth of disruptive innovations which can, in turn, reduce the window for response.

  • 34.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Organization, Leadership, Strategy and Entrepreneurship. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Social Media Analytics as an Enabler for External Search and Open Foresight—The Case of Tesla's Autopilot and Regulatory Scrutiny of Autonomous Driving2022In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 564-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    External search for knowledge and foresight have become strategically important activities for firms in an increasingly uncertain and complex business environment. Novel methods to monitor development are therefore essential for both firms and scholars. This article illustrates how firms can apply one such novel method called Social Media Analytics, a multiplatform approach incorporating multiple external sources drawn from Web 2.0, that enable external search for knowledge but simultaneously avoid information overload. To illustrate the potential of the method, this article draws upon a dataset spanning 36 months from August 2016 to August 2019 and 100 283 publicly posted user-generated contents concerning Tesla to analyze their autopilot and the controversies surrounding autonomous driving. The results show that indications of the regulatory scrutiny Tesla's driverless technology faced in 2019 could be seen in the data across several platforms at an early point and that these signals became stronger over time, especially on blogs and Facebook which exhibited strong indications of future regulatory scrutiny in contrast to Twitter and Instagram. Our results underscore the potential of the Social Media Analytics for external search for knowledge and open foresight that enable firms to tune in to weak signals and scan the periphery.

  • 35. Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Sandström, Christian
    Where's the sharing in the sharing economy? From collaborative consumption to platform capitalism through institutional entrepreneurship2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berthold, Adam
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Exploring barriers to adoption of Virtual Reality through Social Media Analytics and Machine Learning – An assessment of technology, network, price and trialability2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 469-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess how diffusion of Virtual Reality (VR) technology is taking place and identify potential barriers to increased adoption. This is done by utilising Social Media Analytics to collect a data set covering an empirical material of 6044 user-generated content concerning the market‑leading VR headsets Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, and machine learning to identify critical barriers to adoption. Our findings suggest that there is a lack of sufficient technological performance of these headsets and that more applications are required for this technology to take off. We contribute to literature on VR by providing a systematic assessment of current barriers to adoption while also pointing out implications for marketing. 

  • 37.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Klas
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Digitalization and the future of Management Learning: New technology as an enabler of historical, practice-oriented, and critical perspectives in management research and learning2020In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 89-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How are historical, practice-oriented, and critical research perspectives in management affected by digitalization? In this article, we describe and discuss how two digital research approaches can be applied and how they may influence the future directions of management scholarship and education: Social Media Analytics and digital archives. Our empirical illustrations suggest that digitalization generates productivity improvements for scholars, making it possible to undertake research that was previously too laborious. It also enables researchers to pay closer attention to detail while still being able to abstract and generalize. We therefore argue that digitalization contributes to a historical turn in management, that practice-oriented research can be conducted with less effort and improved quality and that micro-level data in the form of digital archives and online contents make it easier to adopt critical perspectives. 

  • 38.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Centre for Innovative Practice, School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Assessing the interplay between crowdfunding and sustainability in social media2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 141, p. 117-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess the degree to which sustainability-oriented dimensions are integrated within the public discourse on crowdfunding in social media. Utilizing Social Media Analytics (SMA), we track discussions on crowdfunding in user-generated content published in social media. Based on an empirical material of 141,754 user-generated content, we identify 308 entries (0.21 percent) explicitly or implicitly relating to sustainability and 80 percent of these 308 entries came from professional actors. In this material, 37 sustainability-oriented campaigns are identified and 26 of them (70 percent) received one entry. Taken together, this paper adds to previous literature by assessing and describing the seemingly minor role played by social media with regards to the interplay between crowdfunding and sustainability.

  • 39.
    Maric, Sebastian
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio.
    Vem vill inte ha mer innovation? (Recension av: Calestous Juma: Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies)2020In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 83-85Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40. Sandström, Christian
    Disruptiv digitalisering inom marknaden för juridiska tjänster: Snabb evolution eller teknisk revolution?2017Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Sandström, Christian
    Ratio och Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Erik Lakomaa, Sedelpressen: Dagens Industri under 30 år (Stocksund: Hydra Förlag 2012). 177 s.2013In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 548-550Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Facit and the displacement of mechanical calculators2013In: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, ISSN 1058-6180, E-ISSN 1934-1547, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 20-31, article id 6517426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explains why Facit, a Swedish manufacturer of mechanical calculators, typewriters, and office furniture, collapsed in the shift from mechanical to electronic calculators in the early 1970s. Facit struggled to develop its own electronic calculators because its competencies were related to mechanics rather than electronics. Because the firm was located in a small company town in Sweden, it was difficult for Facit to access skilled labor related to electronics. Also, a lot of firms entered the industry with the shift to electronics and the increased competitive rivalry further augmented Facit's problems. The rapid development of integrated circuits in 1967-1972 implied that all these structural changes happened in a short period of time, putting firms such as Facit in a problematic situation.

  • 43.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hasselblad and the shift to digital imaging2011In: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, ISSN 1058-6180, E-ISSN 1934-1547, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 55-66, article id 5986497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the high-end Swedish camera manufacturer Hasselblad struggled to integrate its product lines with emerging digital imaging technology. Hasselblad's history illustrates how digital technology emerges in various high-end niche applications and later enters the mainstream markets and displaces incumbents. The Hasselblad case exemplifies how incumbent firms encounter difficulties when such technologies render their skills and products obsolete.

  • 44.
    Sandström, Christian
    Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    High-end disruptive technologies with an inferior performance2011In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 56, no 2-4, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on disruptive technologies has previously stated that those innovations often emerge in low-end segments or in new markets and as the performance improves it eventually displaces the old technology. This article aims to explain how and why a technology may prosper in high-end or mainstream markets despite its initially lower performance and does so through three in-depth case studies. The findings suggest that those technologies may compensate the inferior performance by simplifying and removing work for customers. For instance, digital imaging emerged in high-end segments since these customers were willing to trade-off the initially lower image quality in order to remove the usage of film. Based upon these results, the paper concludes that the literature on disruptive technologies needs to maintain a more nuanced view of value and how it is created and distributed inside the customer's organisation. 

  • 45. Sandström, Christian
    High-end Disruptive Technologies with an inferior performance2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute.
    How disruptive is Tesla, really?2015In: MIT Technology Review, ISSN 1099-274X, no July 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Ratio.
    Hur använder myndigheter utvärderingar?: En studie av årsredovisningar från Vinnova, Energimyndigheten och Tillväxtverket2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I Hur använder myndigheter utvärderingar? studeras myndigheters förhållande till utvärderingar. Författaren utforskar hur Energimyndigheten, Vinnova och Tillväxtverket hänvisar till utvärderingar i sina årsredovisningar under åren 2010–2020 samt vilken effekt myndigheternas satsningar indikeras ha haft. De senaste åren har allt större summor offentliga medel tilldelats industriföretag, bland annat för att främja hållbar utveckling. Det har ökat behovet av utvärderingar och kunskap om hur myndigheterna använder sig av utvärderingar i praktiken. Genom att analysera 33 årsredovisningar från tre olika myndigheter har författaren identifierat över 600 fall där myndigheten beskriver resultat utifrån en utvärdering. Detta ger en bild av hur myndigheter använder sig av utvärderingar som förmedlar positiva respektive negativa slutsatser.  

  • 48.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Innovation through collaboration to meet grand challenges?: A critique of current trends in industrial policy2021In: Swedish perspectives on industrial policy: The Washington Consensus and beyond / [ed] M. Andersson, E. Deiaco & J. Eklund, Örebro: Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum , 2021, p. 89-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introductory paragraph: Within politics, research and large parts of Swedish industry, collaboration has been a buzzword for several decades. The importance of close collaboration and partnerships – between academia and industry, state and industry or all three sectors at the same time, or between suppliers and customers – is always taken for granted and seldom questioned. It seems to be assumed that such collaborations will result in innovation, increased productivity and sustainable development. With few exceptions, these claims are taken for granted and seem so self-evident that no evidence for such effects or any description of the causal mechanisms behind are ever given. The recent and ongoing shift across Europe and Sweden toward more interventionist industrial policies aimed at accomplishing system transformation and renewal constitute examples of how these ideas have gained even more popularity (Mazzucato, 2013). 

  • 49.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute.
    Is 3D printing a disruptive technology? Evidence from the hearing aid industry2015In: Journal of Supply Excellence, ISSN 2257-3615, Vol. 4, p. 18-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola och Ratio.
    Mariana Mazzucato: The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs Private Sector Myths (recension)2015In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 92-94Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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