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  • 1.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sharing knowledge for customization: a triadic perspective2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For customizations where individual customers are involved as early as in design stages, referred to as engineer-to-order (ETO), the ability to effectively share knowledge across organizational boundaries is a necessity. This concerns knowledge shared both in the customer interface and the supplier interface. Different situations may however require different processes for knowledge to be effectively shared. This research proposes a framework for analysing knowledge sharing complexity in ETO scenarios from a triadic perspective. Combined with empirical illustrations, the analytical framework supports in describing scenarios and their implications for effective knowledge sharing.

  • 2.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Early steps in learning about organizational learning in customization settings: A communication perspective2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to empirically investigate the role of learning for suppliers of individualized customizations from a communication perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach: Five companies providing individualized customizations are investigated through an in-depth qualitative approach. The empirical material is based on data from five presentations in one workshop and seven interviews.

    Findings: Four important categories of communication processes between suppliers and customers that stimulate learning were identified: the identification and confirmation of existing knowledge, the identification of knowledge gaps and the creation of new knowledge, the definition of relations and procedures and evaluation and learning.

    Practical implications: These findings can help suppliers of individualized customizations become aware of the important role of organizational learning in their day-to-day operations and the value of improving as a learning organization.

    Originality/value: This cross-disciplinary study brings together organizational learning and customization research. It is a study that focuses on communication in customization tasks as a base for learning. 

  • 3.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Learning to make a difference in customization settings2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Customization-based interaction in ETO2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Customization is an important way for suppliers to offer value to customers and to be competitive. There is a variety of methods suppliers can adopt to offer customization. What they have in common is that some form of interaction between customer and supplier is required as customization is based on involving individual customers in specifying a solution to be produced. This can be achieved, for example, by allowing the customer to choose from components or values that have been defined in advance, later to be assembled or put together according to the customer's wishes. As the possibilities for customization are clearly defined in advance, the supplier can rationalize their procedure to capture customer needs and propose an appropriate solution. This differs from cases where the customer is already involved in the development, design, or engineering stage ± so-called engineer-to-order (ETO) scenarios. Here, the customer is not bound to predefined possibilities for customization, which means that the interaction required to define the solution can extend beyond that required when customization possibilities are predefined and thus limited. In this thesis, customization-based interaction in ETO is investigated, both with the intention of improving the understanding of interaction in this context as such but also to offer ways of explaining how some approaches to customization have implications for interaction that differ from others. The result of the research consists of an account of how interaction is manifested in ETO and how different approaches to customization can be understood to clarify their implications for how solutions are defined.

  • 5.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Viskleken2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Allt fler företag upplever krav på kundanpassning av produkter men för att få nöjda kunder är en förutsättning att förstå vad kunder verkligen vill ha. Kundanpassade produkter förknippas ofta med små serier och kundernas beställningar innehåller olik information för varje order. För företag som erbjuder kundanpassningar kan kundkraven representeras av ”kundorderspecifik information” (KOSI) som inkluderar när, var och vad kunden vill ha. Att fånga dessa parametrar kan vara svårt då ordern ofta skiljer sig från andra. KOSI är inte bara svårt att fånga, när den kommuniceras eller överlämnas mellan individer, avdelningar eller olika informationssystem kan den lätt förvanskas, medvetet eller omedvetet, vilket kan liknas vid en visklek. När meddelandet nått den sista mottagaren är det ofta väsentligt annorlunda mot det som ursprungligen sändes. Dynamiken i denna process kan ses som ”kundorderspecifik kommunikation” (KOSK), dvs den kundorderspecifika informationens överföringsprocess. Syftet med pappret är således att skapa en konceptuell, teoretisk modell kring hur begreppen information och kommunikation förhåller sig till varandra i ETO-kontexter samt diskutera hur vidare forskning på området kan utformas.

  • 6.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Defining solution spaces for customizations2018In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management for Data-Driven, Intelligent, Collaborative, and Sustainable Manufacturing. APMS 2018 / [ed] Ilkyeong Moon, Gyu M. Lee, Jinwoo Park, Dimitris Kiritsis, Gregor von Cieminski, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 95-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customization in different flavors have been identified as an important differentiator if low-cost competitiveness is not viable. To provide a customer unique solution is however not the same as providing a solution that is designed and individualized for a particular delivery to a customer. These two cases are illustrations of how customer requirements may be fulfilled differently depending on the match between stated requirements and the solution offered. The range of solutions that can be offered is represented by a solution space consisting of either predefined or postdefined solutions. Predefined refers to solutions that are defined before commitment to a customer and postdefined refers to solutions that are defined after commitment to a customer. Both cases are constrained by a boundary of possible solutions but the postdefined solutions provide opportunities for bounded innovation beyond what the predefined solutions can provide. Combining the properties of the different solution spaces provides not only an operational definition of customization but also supports in identifying strategic opportunities for extending the solutions and types of customizations a business provides. 

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