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  • 1.
    Abu-Ata, Amani
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sopher, Ran
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Portnoy, Sigal
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Ratzon, Navah Z.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Upper Limb Kinematics of Handwriting among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder2022In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 22, no 23, article id 9224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often experience difficulties with handwriting legibility and speed. This study investigates the relationship between handwriting and upper limb kinematics to characterize movement patterns of children with DCD and typically developing (TD) children.

    Methods: 30 children with and without DCD matched for age, gender, and parent education were compared across handwriting abilities using a standardized handwriting assessment of both copied and dictated tasks (A-A Handwriting). The 3D motion capture system (Qualysis) was used to analyze upper limb kinematics and characterize movement patterns during handwriting and contrasted with written output.

    Results: Children with DCD wrote fewer legible letters in both copying and dictation. Children with DCD also showed poor automatization of key writing concepts. Atypical wrist postures were associated with reduced legibility for children with DCD (F (1,27) 4.71, p = 0.04, p = 0.04, p-η2  0.15); whereas for TD children, better legibility was associated with greater variations in movement speed, particularly of the wrist (rho = −0.578, p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: Results reflect different movement parameters influencing handwriting in children with DCD. An improved understanding of the movement characteristics during handwriting of these children may assist intervention design.

  • 2. Artzi, M.
    et al.
    Shiran, S. I.
    Weinstein, M.
    Myers, V.
    Tarrasch, R.
    Schertz, M.
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    Miller, E.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Green, Dido
    Department Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Ben Bashat, D.
    Cortical reorganization following injury early in life2016In: Neural Plasticity, ISSN 2090-5904, E-ISSN 1687-5443, article id 8615872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain has a remarkable capacity for reorganization following injury, especially during the first years of life. Knowledge of structural reorganization and its consequences following perinatal injury is sparse. Here we studied changes in brain tissue volume, morphology, perfusion, and integrity in children with hemiplegia compared to typically developing children, using MRI. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated reduced total cerebral volume, with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and reduced total white matter volumes, with no differences in total gray matter volume, compared to typically developing children. An increase in cortical thickness at the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion (CLH) was detected in motor and language areas, which may reflect compensation for the gray matter loss in the lesion area or retention of ipsilateral pathways. In addition, reduced cortical thickness, perfusion, and surface area were detected in limbic areas. Increased CSF volume and precentral cortical thickness and reduced white matter volume were correlated with worse motor performance. Brain reorganization of the gray matter within the CLH, while not necessarily indicating better outcome, is suggested as a response to neuronal deficits following injury early in life.

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  • 3. Barnett, A.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Blank, R.
    New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD): focus on adolescents and adults2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Blank, Rainer
    et al.
    Clinic for Child Neurology and Social Pediatrics, Child Centre Maulbronn, Maulbronn, Germany.
    Barnett, Anna L.
    Department of Psychology, Health & Professional Development, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Cairney, John
    Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kirby, Amanda
    Dyscovery Centre, University of South Wales, Newport, United Kingdom.
    Polatajko, Helene
    Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Rosenblum, Sara
    Laboratory of Complex Human Activity and Participation, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien
    Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Sugden, David
    School of Special Needs Education, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Wilson, Peter
    School of Psychology and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Vinçon, Sabine
    Clinic for Child Neurology and Social Pediatrics, Child Centre Maulbronn, Maulbronn, Germany.
    International clinical practice recommendations on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of developmental coordination disorder2019In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 242-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: These international clinical practice recommendations (CPR) for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), initiated by the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), aim to address key questions on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of DCD relevant for clinical practice.

    METHOD: Key questions in five areas were considered through literature reviews and formal expert consensus. For recommendations based on evidence, literature searches on 'mechanisms', 'assessment', and 'intervention' were updated since the last recommendations in 2012. New searches were conducted for 'psychosocial issues' and 'adolescents/adults'. Evidence was rated according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (level of evidence [LOE] 1-4) and transferred into recommendations. For recommendations based on formal consensus, two meetings of an international, multidisciplinary expert panel were conducted with a further five Delphi rounds to develop good clinical practice (GCP) recommendations.

    RESULTS: Thirty-five recommendations were made. Eight were based on the evidence from literature reviews (three on 'assessment', five on 'intervention'). Twenty-two were updated from the 2012 recommendations. New recommendations relate to diagnosis and assessment (two GCPs) and psychosocial issues (three GCPs). Additionally, one new recommendation (LOE) reflects active video games as adjuncts to more traditional activity-oriented and participation-oriented interventions, and two new recommendations (one GCP, one LOE) were made for adolescents and adults with DCD.

    INTERPRETATION: The CPR-DCD is a comprehensive overview of DCD and current understanding based on research evidence and expert consensus. It reflects the state of the art for clinicians and scientists of varied disciplines. The international CPR-DCD may serve as a basis for national guidelines.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    • Updated international clinical practice guidelines on developmental coordination disorder (DCD).
    • Refined and extended recommendations on clinical assessment and intervention for DCD.
    • A critical synopsis of current research on mechanisms of DCD.
    • A critical synopsis of psychosocial issues in DCD, with implications for clinical practice.
    • The first international recommendations to consider adolescents and adults with DCD.
  • 5. Bonthrone, A. F.
    et al.
    Morgan, A. T.
    Mankad, K.
    Clark, C. A.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Liegeois, F. J.
    Brain imaging correlates of limb and speech motor difficulties in children aged 8-10 with Developmental Coordination Disorder2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bonthrone, Alexandra F.
    et al.
    Clinical Systems Neuroscience Section, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; Department of Health Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UK.
    Morgan, Angela T.
    Speech and Language Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
    Mankad, Kshitij
    Radiology Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Clark, Christopher A.
    Clinical Systems Neuroscience Section, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
    Liégeois, Frédérique J.
    Clinical Systems Neuroscience Section, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
    Attention and motor profiles in children with developmental coordination disorder: A neuropsychological and neuroimaging investigation2024In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 362-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study aimed to (1) quantify attention and executive functioning in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), (2) assess whether some children with DCD are more likely to show attention difficulties, and (3) characterize brain correlates of motor and attention deficits.

    METHOD: Fifty-three children (36 with DCD and 17 without) aged 8 to 10 years underwent T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and standardized attention and motor assessments. Parents completed questionnaires of executive functioning and symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity. We assessed regional cortical thickness and surface area, and cerebellar, callosal, and primary motor tract structure.

    RESULTS: Analyses of covariance and one-sample t-tests identified impaired attention, non-motor processing speed, and executive functioning in children with DCD, yet partial Spearman's rank correlation coefficients revealed these were unrelated to one another or the type or severity of the motor deficit. Robust regression analyses revealed that cortical morphology in the posterior cingulate was associated with both gross motor skills and inattentive symptoms in children with DCD, while gross motor skills were also associated with left corticospinal tract (CST) morphology.

    INTERPRETATION: Children with DCD may benefit from routine attention and hyperactivity assessments. Alterations in the posterior cingulate and CST may be linked to impaired forward modelling during movements in children with DCD. Overall, alterations in these regions may explain the high rate of non-motor impairments in children with DCD.

  • 7. Bundy, A.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Group Approaches in Childhood2017In: Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance in Occupational Therapy: Using the CO-OP Approach (TM) to Enable Participation Across the Lifespan / [ed] D. Dawson, S. Mcewen, & H. Polatajko, American Occupational Therapy , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Bundy, Anita C.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Viewing children through multiple lenses2015In: Sensory integration: Theory and practice / [ed] A. C. Bundy & S. J. Lane, Philadelphia: F. A. Davis , 2015, 3Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cohen-Holzer, Marilyn
    et al.
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Katz-Leurer, Michal
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Meyer, Shirley
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Center for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Parush, Shula
    School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine of Hadassah and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
    The effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on hand functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: A non-randomized clinical trial2017In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 516-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To compare the effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on manual functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP).

    Methods:

    Seventeen children aged 6–11 years with UCP participated in one of two intensive therapeutic camps: bimanual (n = 9) incorporating one hour of constraint (“Hybrid”) or Bimanual (n = 8). Each camp met for 2 weeks, 5 days per week for 6 hours each day. The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF) examined bimanual and unimanual functions pre, post- and 3-months post-intervention.

    Results:

    A significant improvement was noted in AHA scores for both groups between the pre-, post- and three months post-intervention [Hybrid (F2; 16 = 85.5, p < 0.01); Bimanual (F2; 16 = 15.4, p < 0.01)] with no significant differences between groups over time (F2; 30 = 0.74, p = 0.48). For the JTTHF, a significant improvement was noted in the affected hand following the Hybrid program (F2; 30 = 7.45, p = 0.01), while following the Bimanual program a significant difference was noted only in the less-affected hand (F2; 16 = 6.02, p < 0.01].

    Conclusion:

    Both interventions Hybrid and Bimanual were similarly effective for improving use of the affected hand in bimanual tasks. The unique contribution of each intervention, the Hybrid program on the affected and the Bimanual on the less-affected side, warrants further examination.

  • 10.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Imms, Christine
    Apex Australia Chair of Neurodevelopment and Disability, Melbourne, Australia; The University of Melbourne, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, Canada; Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Adams Lyngbäck, Liz
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; FUB Swedish National Association for People with Intellectual Disability, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University.
    Arnell, Susann
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Centre for Research & Development Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Brooks, Rob
    Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK.
    Eldh, Maria
    Norrköping Habilitation Centre, Region Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Engde, Lisa
    Linköping Habilitation Centre, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Engkvist, Helena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. College of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UK.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Karlsson, Charlotte
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sjödin, Linda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping Habilitation Centre, Region Jönköpings län, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    A systematic review of longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities2023In: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, ISSN 1056-263X, E-ISSN 1573-3580Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To review the longitudinal trajectories – and the factors influencing their development – of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Systematic review methods were employed. Searches of six databases used keywords and MeSH terms related to children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, mental health problems, and longitudinal research. After the removal of duplicates, reviewers independently screened records for inclusion, extracted data (outcomes and influencing factors), and evaluated the risk of bias. Findings were tabulated and synthesized using graphs and a narrative. Searches identified 94,662 unique records, from which 49 publications were included. The median publication year was 2015. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were the most commonly included population in retrieved studies. In almost 50% of studies, trajectories of mental health problems changed by < 10% between the first and last time point. Despite multiple studies reporting longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems, greater conceptual clarity and consideration of the measures included in research is needed, along with the inclusion of a more diverse range of populations of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

  • 11. Farr, W.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom.
    Male, I.
    Morris, C.
    Bailey, S.
    Gage, H.
    Speller, S.
    Colville, V.
    Jackson, M.
    Bremner, S.
    Memon, A.
    Therapeutic potential and ownership of commercially available consoles in children with cerebral palsy2017In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    We conducted a survey amongst families of children with cerebral palsy to ascertain the ownership and therapeutic use and potential of commercial games consoles to improve motor function.

    Method:

    Three hundred families in South East England were identified through clinical records, and were requested to complete an anonymised questionnaire.

    Results:

    A total of 61 families (20% response) returned a completed questionnaire with 41 (68%) identified males and 19 (32%) identified females with cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 11 years 5 months (SD 3Y 7M). The large majority of families, 59 (97%), owned a commercial console and the child used this for 50-300 minutes a week. Returns by severity of motor impairment were: Gross Motor Function Classification System I (22%), II (32%), III (13%), IV (15%), V (18%). Consoles were used regularly for play across all Gross Motor Function Classification System categories.

    Conclusion:

    The potential of games consoles, as home-based virtual reality therapy, in improving the motor function of children with cerebral palsy should be appropriately tested in a randomised controlled trial. Wide ownership, and the relative ease with which children engage in the use of commercially-based virtual reality therapy systems, suggests potential as a means of augmenting therapy protocols, taking advantage of interest and participation patterns of families.

  • 12.
    Farr, W. J.
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Male, I.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Morris, C.
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Gage, H.
    School of Economics, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.
    Bailey, S.
    Medical School. University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Speller, S.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Colville, V.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Jackson, M.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Bremner, S.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Memon, A.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability2017In: Rehabilitation: Innovations and Challenges in the Use of Virtual Reality Technologies / [ed] W. Powell, A. Rizzo, P. M. Sharkey, & J. Merrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Farr, W. J.
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Male, I.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Morris, C.
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Gage, H.
    School of Economics, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.
    Bailey, S.
    Medical School. University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Speller, S.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Colville, V.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Jackson, M.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Bremner, S.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Memon, A.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability2016In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference in Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, Los Angeles, California, USA, 20-22 September, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) approach is adopted to discuss issues and challenges in virtual reality therapy research in community health settings. Widespread variation within and between populations, e.g. co-morbid conditions, complicates treatment fidelity and applicability. Interventions require flexible dose and frequency to fit into children’s family circumstances, with clearly employed specialist paediatric research staff. Comparisons require adaptation to digital technology, and keep pace with development. Outcomes may overstate the impact of virtual reality therapy and technological novelty, while not fully unpacking hidden digital effects. A wide set of agreed, flexible, and patient-centred outcome measures are required to establish positive clinical baseline.

  • 14. Farr, William
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Male, Ian
    Morris, Christopher
    Bailey, Sarah
    Gage, Heather
    Speller, Sandra
    Colville, Val
    Jackson, M.
    Bremner, Stephen
    Memon, Anjum
    Feasibility of an RCT to evaluate home-based virtual reality therapy in children with cerebral palsy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Farr, William J.
    et al.
    Research and Innovation, Sussex Community NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Bremner, Stephen
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Male, Ian
    Research and Innovation, Sussex Community NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Gage, Heather
    School of Economics, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom.
    Bailey, Sarah
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Speller, Sandra
    Research and Innovation, Sussex Community NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Colville, Valerie
    Parent partnership advisors Sussex Community NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Jackson, Mandy
    Parent partnership advisors Sussex Community NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Memon, Anjum
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Morris, Christopher
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate home-based virtual reality therapy in children with cerebral palsy2021In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 85-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Evidence is increasing for effective virtual reality therapy for motor rehabilitation for children with Cerebral Palsy. We assessed the feasibility of a virtual reality therapy mode of intervention, appropriateness of measures, and potential cost-effectiveness.

    Methods: A 12-week, 2-group, parallel-feasibility trial (ISRCT 17624388) using Nintendo Wii FitTM at home. Children aged 5–16, with ambulatory Cerebral Palsy, who were able to follow simple instructions were randomised to two groups; one supported by physiotherapists (individualised activity programme), the other unsupported with children having free choice (control). Children were assessed in clinic at baseline, week 6, and week 12 by blinded assessors. Feasibility of the intervention was assessed via recruitment, adherence, and usefulness of measurement tools.

    Results: Forty-four children were eligible (out of 48 approached): 31 consented, 30 were randomised, 21 completed the study; 10 in the supported group and 11 in the unsupported group. Nine children discontinued from tiredness, after-school activities, homework, surgery, technical difficulties or negative system feedback. The supported group completed 19 of 36 (IQR 5-35) possible sessions; the unsupported group 24 of 36 sessions (IQR 8-36). Gross Motor Function Measure scores varied by Cerebral Palsy severity after the intervention. There were no adverse events.

    Conclusion: Virtual reality therapy offers potential as a therapeutic adjunct for children with Cerebral Palsy, warranting substantive confirmatory study. Gross Motor Function Measure, with modifications to improve sensitivity, appeared appropriate as a primary measure, with Timed up and Go test secondary. The intervention was inexpensive costing £20 per child. An explanatory trial to evaluate the clinical/cost-effectiveness of commercial system virtual reality therapy is feasible with minor methodological adaptation.

    Implications for rehabilitation

    • Home-based interactive computer gaming was feasible, safe and cost effective as a therapy adjunct.
    • Discontinue if additional pressures are present: imminent surgery, family resilience to technical difficulties, negative system feedback, after-school activities.
    • Change in Gross Motor Function Measurement scores varied by severity of Cerebral Palsy. 
  • 16.
    Farr, William
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Male, Ian
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Oxford Brookes University.
    Morris, Christopher
    University of Exeter Medical School.
    Gage, Heather
    University of Surrey.
    Bailey, Sarah
    University of Exeter Medical School.
    Speller, Sandra
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Colville, Val
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Jackson, Mandy
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Bremner, Stephen
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School.
    Memon, Anjum
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School.
    Methodological issues of using placebos in interventions based on digital technology2017In: Journal of Mobile Technology in Medicine, ISSN 1839-7808, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 56-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Use of placebo is the ideal for comparison in clinical trials to reduce biases. With digital technology being used more frequently in healthcare interventions, how do we determine the placebo effect where interventions exploit technology? If placebo in medicine is traditionally defined by a lack of pharmacological agents, how might we begin to move towards controlling for effects of digital technology?

    Method: This paper explores the traditional placebo effect and discusses its impact in healthcare contexts with digital technology with reference to a particular trial. Different meanings of placebo in the context of evaluating technology suggest new challenges and positive consequences.

    Results: Methodological considerations are discussed, which enabled the development of a placebo-controlled evaluation of a digital technology in healthcare and rehabilitation.

    Conclusion: Digital placebo was controlled in our trial by employing technology across all groups in the absence of evidence-based practice and shows how to control for unknown and hidden effects of technology.

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  • 17.
    Fischer, E.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Occupation as means and ends in paediatric occupational therapy: A systematic review2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1181-1198Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge in paediatric occupational therapy about the effectiveness of interventions using daily activities as a treatment modality in improving children’s participation.

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions in improving participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability.

    Material and methods: A systematic review based on Joanna Briggs Institute methodology and critical appraisal tools was conducted. Six databases were searched for quantitative intervention studies aimed at improving participation in everyday occupations of young children with a disability through the use of everyday occupation.

    Results: The search yielded 3732 records, of which 13 studies met inclusion criteria. Ten studies met methodological quality criteria and were included in the synthesis, five randomised controlled trials and five quasi-experimental studies, involving a total of 424 children with a mean age of 6.5 years. The studies were classified into cognitive (n = 5), context-focussed (n = 2) and playgroup interventions (n = 3). Study quality ranged from low to moderate, only one study was rated high quality.

    Conclusions and significance: Occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions may have a positive effect on participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability, but study design, risk of bias and insufficient reporting limit confidence in the body of evidence.

  • 18.
    Fischer, Evelin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Systematic review protocol of the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupation-focused interventions used in occupational therapy to improve participation in everyday activities for young children with a disability [protocol]2022Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Review question / Objective: The aim of this review was to identify, appraise, evaluate and synthesise evidence of the effectiveness of interventions using occupations and/or occupational performance outcomes in improving activities of daily living and participation of young children with a disability. The PICOS framework was used to develop the review question: Population – children with a disability under the age of 10. Intervention – interventions which are both occupation-based and occupation-focused provided by an occupational therapist in groups or individually, incorporating participation in everyday occupations in the most natural context possible or focusing directly on participation in everyday occupations instead of focusing on improving underlying functions in order to better participate in everyday occupations (1)(Fisher, 2013). Control – alternative occupational therapy (OT) intervention, alternative non-OT intervention or no intervention. Outcome – improved participation in everyday occupations assessed before and after the intervention, measured by standardized assessment tools or self-report measures of occupational performance, engagement and participation. Study characteristics – Systematic Review of original studies (levels I and II, Joanna Briggs Institute) including Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) or quasiexperimental designs (eg. with Pre-test – post-test or historic/ retrospective control group study). Research Question: “What is the evidence for the effectiveness of occupation-based and occupationfocused interventions in improving participation in everyday occupations for young children with a disability?”

  • 19.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Are proprioceptive functions affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy?2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 805-806Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Caring for Carers2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Challenges in combining upper limb and lower limb interventions in protocols for children with brain injury2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 335-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Designing ‘free’ spaces for children with disabilities2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 730-730Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Green, Dido
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Developmental coordination disorder in children with ADHD and physical therapy intervention2010In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 308-308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    From Body Functions to Activity Competence, Participation & Engagement2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Green, Dido
    NIHR GSTFT/KCL Biomedical Research Centre, Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Hand function and fine motor activities2009In: Finnie's Handling the Young Child with Cerebral Palsy at Home / [ed] Eva Bower, Elsevier, 2009, 4, p. 243-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler School of Medicine, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Limitations of meta-analyses2012In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1774-1775Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders: Review and Implications for Occupational Therapy practice2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Overlapping samples in systematic reviews and meta-analyses: Interpreting findings of cognitive outcomes following preterm birth2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 12, p. 1290-1290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Prognostication and the unpredictable nature of HIV encephalopathy with bilateral lower limb spasticity2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, p. 348-349Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The Tyneside Pegboard Test: balancing clinical utility against ecological validity2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 224-224Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Time and relativity in therapeutic rehabilitation2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Translating evidence into practice2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1132-1133Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Typology and categorization in developmental coordination disorder: Where does this leave us?2022In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 64, no 11, p. 1316-1317Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Virtual reality for rehabilitation : Moving forward2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Baird, G.
    Barnett, A. L.
    Henderson, L.
    Huber, J.
    Henderson, S. E.
    The severity and nature of motor impairment in Asperger's syndrome: A comparison with Specific Developmental Disorder of Motor Function2002In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 655-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The aims of this study were to measure objectively the extent and severity of motor impairment in children with Asperger's syndrome and to determine whether the motor difficulties experienced by such children differed in any way from those classified as having a Specific Developmental Disorder of Motor Function (SDD-MF). Criteria derived from ICD 10-R were used to identify 11 children with Asperger's syndrome and a matched group of 9 children with a Specific Developmental Disorder of Motor Function. Children in both groups were required to have a verbal IQ of 80 or greater on the WISC IIIR.

    Method:

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview (Revised; Lord, Rutter, & LeCouteur, 1994) was used to identify features of AS in the first group and to exclude them in the latter. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children (Henderson & Sugden, 1992) provided a standardised test of motor impairment. A Gesture Test based on that by Cermak, Coster, and Drake (1980) was used to assess the child's ability to mime the use of familiar tools and to imitate meaningless sequences of movements.

    Results:

    All the children with Asperger's syndrome turned out to meet our criterion for a diagnosis of motor impairment, five of the six most severely motor impaired children in the whole study being from this group. Performance of the Asperger group was also slightly poorer on the Gesture Test. The profile of performance on each test was examined in detail but no evidence of group differences in the pattern of impairment was found.

    Conclusions:

    This study is consistent with others suggesting a high prevalence of clumsiness in Asperger's syndrome. Our findings also attest to the widespread prevalence of motor impairment in developmental disorders and the problems such co-morbidity poses for attempts to posit discrete and functionally coherent impairments underlying distinct syndromes.

  • 36.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Baird, G.
    Sugden, D.
    A pilot study of psychopathology in Developmental Coordination Disorder2006In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This paper explores the prevalence of emotional and behavioural disorders in children referred to a Community Paediatric Occupational Therapy service for assessment and treatment of problems with development of motor skills.

    Methods:

    Parents of 47 children from a clinical sample of children who had been identified with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) returned the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) - a brief measure of the pro-social behaviour and psychopathology that can be completed by parents, teachers or youths.

    Results:

    Significant emotional and behavioural problems were reported by 29 parents (62%) with a further six (13%) reporting problems in the borderline range. Seven children (15%) were without significant problems in one or more area although only four of these (9%) were outside the borderline range for all of the sub-domains of the SDQ.

    Discussion:

    A significant proportion of children with DCD were reported by their parents to be at risk of psychopathology. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between motor difficulties and emotional and behavioural symptoms; however, it is recommended that interventions for children with DCD should support mental health and behavioural problems as well as motor development.

  • 37.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Beaton, L.
    Moore, D.
    Warren, L.
    Wick, V.
    Sanford, J. E.
    Santosh, P.
    Clinical incidence of sensory integration difficulties in adults with learning disabilities and illustration of management2003In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 454-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigated the prevalence of sensory processing problems in a clinical group and also examined the clinical effectiveness of a specialised therapeutic technique, sensory integrative therapy (SIT), in the treatment of maladaptive behaviours in two adults with learning disabilities. The Sensory Integration Inventory - Revised for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (SII-R, Reisman and Hanschu 1992) was used to identify two clients suspected of having poor sensory processing. A single-subject experimental design (ABAB) was used to assist the objective measurement of the effects of SIT. The results suggest that the SII-R has some limitations in identifying clients who would benefit from SIT. One client (Ms D) was seen to instigate more positive interactions with her environment during and following the treatment phases; however, the overhabituated behaviours of the other client (Mr K) showed little response to SIT. These results are discussed in the form of a practitioner's update, with respect to the indicators of sensory processing dysfunction and the potential therapeutic benefits of SIT as an adjunct to therapeutic interventions for individuals with learning disabilities.

  • 38.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Bishop, T.
    Wilson, B. N.
    Crawford, S.
    Hooper, R.
    Kaplan, B.
    Baird, G.
    Is questionnaire-based screening part of the solution to waiting lists for children with developmental coordination disorder?2005In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to determine whether questionnaire-based screening could be part of the solution to a long waiting list of referrals for occupational therapy assessment by identifying the requirement for clinical assessments. The performance of two questionnaires - the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) completed by parents and the Checklist of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (C-ABC) completed by teachers - was compared with a more traditional clinical assessment for the identification of DCD in children already referred to occupational therapy. It was found that the parent report was quite reliable in the identification of DCD if no other developmental problem was present. However, there was little benefit to using the teacher report to screen children. Several confounding variables, including an unequal proportion of children with DCD in the sample and the inclusion of children who were younger than the age range of the DCDQ, may have influenced how well the questionnaires performed. Although questionnaires cannot replace a full clinical assessment, the results showed that there may be some value in including the parent report in the identification of DCD.

  • 39.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Occupational Therapy, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
    Boltin, Shana
    Occupational Therapy, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
    Ward, Aimee
    Occupational Therapy, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
    Gowing, Francesca
    Clinical Research, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
    Hutchon, Betty
    Occupational Therapy, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
    Coproducing virtual reality technologies for rehabilitation2019In: 2019 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation (ICVR), IEEE, 2019, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-production is essential to ensure patient needs are identified, outcomes met and implementation achieved. A modified Delphi approach involving key stakeholders was used to: identify and prioritise outcomes of importance in relation to Virtual Reality (VR) technology design in order to address clinical issues; define outcome measures/develop bespoke project measures; and determine clinical trial design. Results reflect three key themes of motivation for system design and evaluation: autonomy, relatedness and competence. Young people with disabilities and their families have invaluable contributions to the design and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation.

  • 40.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Chambers, M. E.
    Sugden, D. A.
    Does subtype of developmental coordination disorder count: Is there a differential effect on outcome following intervention?2008In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 363-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a heterogeneous condition in which children frequently present with co-occurring conditions in addition to their motor difficulties. This study considered whether there would be a differential effect of a group treatment program on subtypes of perceptual and movement problems or associated co-occurring conditions. A subset of children (n = 43) from a larger clinical sample (n = 100) with DCD participated in a 2 frac(1, 4) year cross-over intervention study which followed the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance (CO-OP) approach. Original subtypes were determined by contrasting the current sample with previously published subtyping studies in DCD [Hoare, D. (1994). Subtypes of developmental coordination disorder. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 11, 158-169; Macnab, J. J., Miller, L. T., & Polatajko, H. J. (2001). The search for subtypes of DCD: Is cluster analysis the answer? Human Movement Science, 20, 49-72]. No advantage was conferred to any subtype although children with more profound and complex difficulties at initial assessment, despite progress following intervention, were most likely to have continuing difficulties at the end of the project.

  • 41.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Marston Road Campus, Jack Straw’s Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Chandler, S.
    Charman, T.
    Simonoff, E.
    Baird, G.
    Brief Report: DSM-5 Sensory Behaviours in Children With and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder2016In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 3597-3606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical responses to sensory stimuli are a new criterion in DSM-5 for the diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) but are also reported in other developmental disorders. Using the Short Sensory profile (SSP) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised we compared atypical sensory behaviour (hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual sensory interests) in children aged 10–14 years with (N = 116) or without an ASD but with special educational needs (SEN; N = 72). Atypical sensory behaviour was reported in 92 % of ASD and 67 % of SEN children. Greater sensory dysfunction was associated with increased autism severity (specifically restricted and repetitive behaviours) and behaviour problems (specifically emotional subscore) on teacher and parent Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires but not with IQ.

  • 42.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Guy's ad St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Charman, T.
    Pickles, A.
    Chandler, S.
    Loucas, T.
    Simonoff, E.
    Baird, G.
    Impairment in movement skills of children with autistic spectrum disorders2009In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 311-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    We undertook this study to explore the degree of impairment in movement skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and a wide IQ range.

    Methods:

    Movement skills were measured using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) in a large, well defined, population-derived group of children (n = 101: 89 males, 12 females; mean age 11 y 4 mo, SD 10 mo; range 10 y-14 y 3 mo) with childhood autism and broader ASD and a wide range of IQ scores. Additionally, we tested whether a parent-completed questionnaire, the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ), was useful in identifying children who met criteria for movement impairments after assessment (n = 97 with complete M-ABCs and DCDQs).

    Results:

    Of the children with ASD, 79% had definite movement impairments on the M-ABC; a further 10% had borderline problems. Children with childhood autism were more impaired than children with broader ASD, and children with an IQ less than 70 were more impaired than those with IQ more than 70. This is consistent with the view that movement impairments may arise from a more severe neurological impairment that also contributes to intellectual disability and more severe autism. Movement impairment was not associated with everyday adaptive behaviour once the effect of IQ was controlled for. The DCDQ performed moderately well as a screen for possible motor difficulties.

    Interretation:

    Movement impairments are common in children with ASD. Systematic assessment of movement abilities should be considered a routine investigation.

  • 43.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lavesson, Niklas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computing, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Chaos theory and artificial intelligence may provide insights on disability outcomes2019In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 1120-1120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Marston Road Campus, Jack Straw s Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Lim, M.
    Lang, B.
    Pohl, K.
    Turk, J.
    Sensory Processing Difficulties in Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome2016In: Journal of Child Neurology, ISSN 0883-0738, E-ISSN 1708-8283, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 965-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare but serious neurological condition resulting in loss of control of eye movements, often accompanied by difficulties in posture and movement control with reports of sensory sensitivities potentially impacting on behavior. This pilot study characterizes the presence of atypical sensory behaviors in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome through questionnaire survey of a cohort of families. The Short Sensory Profile, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, and Developmental Behaviour Checklist were distributed to 30 families; 16 were returned anonymously. Atypical sensory behaviors were identified in a large proportion (62.5%). Children reported as being more anxious showed greater sensitivity to auditory stimuli, U(14) 11, P =.026. This is consistent with recent recognition of more extensive disease neurocognitive effects in Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Further research is needed to increase understanding of the complex pathology of this disease and to provide indicators for sensory and behavioral as well as pharmacological interventions.

  • 45.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Lingam, R.
    Mattocks, C.
    Riddoch, C.
    Ness, A.
    Emond, A.
    The risk of reduced physical activity in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder: A prospective longitudinal study2011In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1332-1342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder have an increased risk of reduced moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), using data from a large population based study. Prospectively collected data from 4331 children (boys = 2065, girls = 2266) who had completed motor coordination testing at 7 years and accelerometry at 12 years were analysed from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Probable DCD (p-DCD) was defined, using criteria based on the DSM IV classification, as those children below the 15th centile of the ALSPAC Coordination Test at seven years who had a functional impairment in activities of daily living or handwriting, excluding children with a known neurological diagnosis or IQ < 70. Secondary exposure variables consisted of subtests from the ALSPAC Coordination test (manual dexterity, ball skills and balance). Objective measurement of the average daily minutes of MVPA was recorded as ≥3600 counts per minute (cpm) using actigraph accelerometry. Boys with p-DCD were less physically active than boys without DCD (mean difference in MVPA 4.36. cpm, t= 2.69; p= 0.007). For boys, targeting skill (bean bag toss) was related to increased MVPA, after adjustment for confounding factors including neonatal, family and environmental factors as well as Body Mass Index at age seven and 12 years (β= 0.76, t= 3.37, p< 0.001, CI 0.32-1.20). There was no difference in level of MVPA in girls with and without p-DCD (mean difference 1.35. min, t= 0.97, p= 0.31), which may reflect the low levels of MVPA of girls in this cohort. Our findings suggest that the presence of movement difficulties, particularly poor targeting (bean bag toss/ball skills), at a young age is a potential risk factor for reduced MVPA in boys.

  • 46.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Meroz, A.
    Margalit, A. E.
    Ratzon, N. Z.
    A validation study of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS) for use with children2012In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 985-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines a potential instrument for measurement of typing postures of children. This paper describes inter-rater, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS), an observational measurement of postures and movements during keyboarding, for use with children. Two trained raters independently rated videos of 24 children (aged 7-10 years). Six children returned one week later for identifying test-retest reliability. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing ratings obtained using the K-PECS to scores from a 3D motion analysis system. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to high for 12 out of 16 items (Kappa: 0.46 to 1.00; correlation coefficients: 0.77-0.95) and test-retest reliability varied across items (Kappa: 0.25 to 0.67; correlation coefficients: r = 0.20 to r = 0.95). Concurrent validity compared favourably across arm pathlength, wrist extension and ulnar deviation. In light of the limitations of other tools the K-PeCS offers a fairly affordable, reliable and valid instrument to address the gap for measurement of typing styles of children, despite the shortcomings of some items. However further research is required to refine the instrument for use in evaluating typing among children.

  • 47.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mount, M.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Jon-Dare, G.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Carroll, J.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Relationship between capacity and performance in young children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy and impact on participation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Ealing Services for Children with Disabilities, London NW Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
    Mount, M.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Jon-Dare, G.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Carroll, J.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Social‐emotional impact of unilateral cerebral palsy on participation: influence of a group intervention2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no S2, p. 14-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Payne, Sally
    Heart of England Foundation, NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK.
    Understanding organisational ability and self-regulation in children with developmental coordination disorder2018In: Current Developmental Disorders Reports, ISSN 2196-2987, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Review

    This paper examines physical and emotional coherence in young people with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Specifically, the transactional relationship between motor and non-motor/executive dysfunction in children with DCD and its impact on psychosocial functioning is explored.

    Recent Findings

    This paper integrates the subjective reported experiences of young people with DCD with objective measurements and findings from neuroimaging studies.

    Summary

    Consideration of the transactional relationship between the person, the activity and the environment, whether these factors be physical, social, attitudinal or virtual, will be fundamental to our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning organisational and emotional issues presenting in DCD. Integrating the experiences of young people with research evidence will be essential to improve outcomes for young people with DCD in clinical practice.

  • 50.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Schertz, M.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Moore, A.
    Schejter Margalit, T.
    Farquharson, Y.
    Ben Bashat, D.
    Weinstein, M.
    Lin, J. -P
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    A multi-site study of functional outcomes following a themed approach to hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy for children with hemiplegia2013In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 527-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    This study investigated the effects of a theme-based ('magic') variation of the hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy programme, in two different countries, in improving activity performance for children with hemiplegia, including those with severe movement restrictions.

    Method:

    Twenty-three children with spastic hemiplegia (13 males, 10 females; mean age 10y 7mo, range 7-15y; Manual Ability Classification System level I, two; level II, 13; level III, eight), participated in one of three, 2-week, summer camps. A within-participant experimental design was used with the Assisting Hand Assessment and Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire as primary outcome measures. Evaluations occurred immediately before the first day, on the last day, and 3 months after intervention. Two groups underwent additional assessments 2 weeks before the camp.

    Results:

    Significant intervention effects were seen on the Assisting Hand Assessment (p=0.002) and on the Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire (p<0.001), the latter maintained at follow-up. The affected hand was reported to be used in 25% of bimanual activities before the camp, progressing to 93% after camp, and decreasing to 86% at follow-up. Severity of impairment did not influence progress.

    Interpretation:

    This themed approach to intensive intervention showed positive results in bimanual use, with improvements in independence sustained at follow-up. Although children across camps and motor severity made progress, some questions remain about intensity and duration of intervention to optimize longer-term outcomes.

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