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  • 1.
    Alcaraz, Jose M.
    et al.
    Munich Business School, Munich, Germany.
    Shandler, Keary
    Murdoch University, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Western Australia University, Perth, Australia.
    Connectivity and cross-scale dynamics: MBA learning - experiences across three regions2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can non-experts and, particularly, business professionals and students grasp key issues around industry, connectivity and cross-scale dynamics? Here we will present the findings of our pedagogical work, undertaken during more than two years across three regions (Perth in Western Australia, a mining-dependent state, and the two fast-developing regions of Singapore and Dubai). Our key assumption is that it is precisely the business community the one that needs to understand and address important connectivity issues, as industry is the main driver of the Anthropocene. We engaged our MBA [Master in Business Administration] students in an amateur, documentary-style film-making project centered on the linkages between industry, the Anthropocene and the planetary boundaries framework (Rockstrom et al, 2009; Steffen et al, 2015). Here we will present the multiple insights and outcomes (at cognitive, skills and emotional spheres) resulting from their experiential-learning project, and how similar pedagogical experiences may help learners identify key industry dynamics, interactions and teleconnections - experiencing those at the local level ("in their own skin" or "backyard"), at regional and planetary levels. We argue that these are key issues for organizational leaders, to foster deeper and more informed approaches to justice and responsibility and, ultimately, to reconnect with the biosphere.

  • 2.
    Cacioppe, Ron
    et al.
    University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia.
    Adjusting blurred visions: A typology of integral approaches to organisations2005In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 230-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The growing interest in developing and applying "integral" approaches to organisations has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in different ways of interpreting this term. This article aims to present a set of criteria to help in defining the varieties of integral approaches to the study of organisations.

    Design/methodology/approach - These criteria are derived from Ken Wilber's integral framework. The constitutive elements of Wilber's multi-paradigm framework are used to develop a typology that honours the many forms that integral approaches can take.

    Findings - It is proposed that the key criteria for assessing integral approaches to organisational life are: the structural focus, the engagement with process, and the emphasis on spirituality or essential purpose. Four type categories result from applying the structural criteria. These range from a general type that utilises broadly holistic concepts through to type which employs the detailed application of developmental quadrant and level concepts that formally define the integral approach as conceived by Ken Wilber. The engagement and spirituality criteria are additional enriching criteria that establish the integrity of the methods and purposes used in truly integral approaches.

    Originality/value - The proposed typology will help in understanding how different authors, researchers and practitioners represent and apply the term "integral" within organisational contexts.

  • 3.
    Cacioppe, Ron
    et al.
    Integral Leadership Centre, Graduate School of Management, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Integral Leadership Centre, Graduate School of Management, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
    Seeking the Holy Grail of organisational development: A synthesis of integral theory, spiral dynamics, corporate transformation and action inquiry2005In: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 86-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - There are several stage-based models of organisational development (OD) that provide a systematic overview of the developmental potential of organisations. This paper compares four such models - Ken Wilber's integral theory, the spiral dynamics model of Don Beck and Chris Cowan, Richard Barrett's corporate transformation model, and William Torbert's action inquiry model - with the aim of presenting an integrated account of the stages of OD.

    Design/methodology/approach - Integral theory is used as the basis for considering the theoretical scope of these other models of OD. The integral framework is specifically designed to recognise the valid insights of other models of organisational change and, as such, is well suited for situating those insights in a comprehensive and coherent approach for mapping the developmental paths of organisations. The models considered represent some of the more innovative OD approaches.

    Findings - From the comparative analysis an integral model for OD is described. The description includes a new definition of OD which is based on integral theory's core developmental principles.

    Research limitations/implications - The proposed framework provides a means for assessing the scope and specificity of other approaches to OD. It also provides criteria for distinguishing between those approaches that are concerned with incremental or continuous change and those that focus on transformative development.

    Practical implications - The comparative analysis and resulting framework will assist practitioners and consultants in the OD field in developing a better understanding of the relationships between various stage-based approaches to OD. Originality/value - This paper provides a comprehensive framework that can assist in comparing and situating the many approaches to OD that are currently available.

  • 4. Caspersz, D.
    et al.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The Body Corporate: An Integrative Framework For Embodied Emotion In Family Business Life2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Chappell, Stacie
    et al.
    Western New England University, College of Business, USA.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    The University of Western Australia.
    Webb, Dave
    The University of Western Australia.
    Sustaining voices: Applying giving voice to values to sustainability issues2013In: Journal of Business Ethics Education, ISSN 1649-5195, E-ISSN 2044-4559, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 211-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We apply an action-oriented approach to business ethics education, Giving Voice to Values (GVV), to the topic of sustainability. The increasingly problematic impact of unsustainable economic activity is demanding actionable responses from business. However, traditional business ethics education has focussed on awareness and decision-making and neglected action-oriented methods. The GVV curriculum offers an applied and process-driven ethics approach that complements more analytical ethics pedagogies. Because of its focus on action and expressing personal values, GVV can be thought of as largely applicable to the micro-level of interpersonal interactions. This paper illustrates GVV's potential for much broader application by presenting two caselettes spanning the micro-level of workplace refurbishment to the global-level of the mass dumping of electronic waste. Ways of crafting conversations around these sustainability issues are presented and implications of the GVV approach for both the teaching and practice of sustainability ethics are discussed.

  • 6. Chappell, Stacie
    et al.
    Webb, Dave
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    A required GVV ethics course: Conscripting ethical conversations2011In: Journal of Business Ethics Education, ISSN 1649-5195, E-ISSN 2044-4559, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 308-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business schools around the globe are seeking effective ways of incorporating business ethics into their programs (Melé 2008, Swanson 2004). Indications from both the market and accrediting bodies suggest best-practice programs will include ethics education. However, the debate continues as to whether meaningful learning is best achieved through stand-alone ethics experiences or via an integrated theme across the program of study (Tesfayohannes & Driscoll 2010, Wilhelm 2005). While many examples of required ethics-experiences can be found, to date, there is only one business school that we are aware of that has implemented a required full-term post-graduate ethics course based on the Giving Voice To Values (GVV) (Gentile 2008) philosophy and content. The purpose of this article is to share the tacit knowledge gained in the authors' experience of implementing such a course at the University of Western Australia's Business School.

  • 7. Edwards, Mark G.
    A future in the balance: Integral theory and global developmental pathologies2005In: Knowledge base of futures studies: Vol. 3: Directions and outlooks / [ed] Richard Slaughter, Sohail Inayatullah & José Ramos, Indooroopilly, Qld: Foresight International , 2005, Rev. ed.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    A metatheoretical evaluation of chaordic systems thinking2014In: Systems research and behavioral science, ISSN 1092-7026, E-ISSN 1099-1743, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 160-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a metatheoretical evaluation of chaordic systems thinking (ChST) as it applies to organizational transformation. The diversity of approaches to transformation means that it is rich territory for metatheoretical research. ChST can be regarded as a metatheoretical attempt to integrate conceptual lenses so that a richer conceptualisation of transformation can be developed. ChST aims to be an integrative and innovative theoretical contribution to understanding change. How might these claims be evaluated? A metatheoretical method called metatriangulation is applied here to evaluate the ChST framework. A review and analysis of 20 ChST texts was performed and found that the approach shares several lenses with other theories of organizational transformation, but it also omits some important lenses and only partially described others. Recommendations for the further development of ChST are presented. Although important for developing novel insights, metatheoretical research is rarely performed systematically. This paper presents an original approach to building and evaluating overarching frameworks for organizational transformation.

  • 9. Edwards, Mark G.
    An integral metatheory for organisational sustainability: Living with a crowded bottom line in chaotic times2010In: Business sustainability I: Management, technology and learning for individuals, organisations and society in turbulent environments / [ed] Putnik, G. D., Ávila, P., Guimarães: School of Engineering, University of Minho , 2010, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    An integrative metatheory for organisational learning and sustainability in turbulent times2009In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 189-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Theories of organizational learning and sustainability must be able to respond to contemporary social issues and accommodate, in some way, the multiplicity of perspectives that are present in society on these topics. One way of developing multi-perspectival capacities in the scientific understandings is through the building of metatheory. Nowhere is this task more urgently needed than in the study of organisational sustainability. To be sustainable, organisations must not only meet economic, environmental, social and governance requirements but also learn to embody them in their practices and values even during times of turbulence and extraordinary upheaval. The purpose of this paper is to propose a metatheoretical approach to organizational sustainability that can accommodate this plurality.

    Design/methodology/approach: Three important metatheoretical lenses - the developmental, internal-external and learning lenses - are presented which have particular relevance to turbulent organizational environments and the transformational imperatives that arise from them. These lenses are then used individually and in combination to discuss several paradoxes related to learning and sustainability issues.

    Findings: The growth, learning and sustainability paradoxes present a number of challenges to organisational learning capacities that can be usefully discussed within a metatheoretical context. The set of metatheoretical lenses identified here provide some new avenues for achieving authentic sustainability.

    Practical implications: There are two important implications of metatheoretical discussion. The first is the opening up of new directions for middle-range theory. The second is the capacity of metatheory to critically examine extant theories and research paradigms. Several issues are raised in this paper concerning the evaluation of current theories of organisational learning and sustainability.

    Originality/value: The metatheoretical approach to learning and sustainability proposed here resolves some fundamental paradoxes facing organisations and it opens up new ways of conceptualising the radical transformations required to meet the sustainability challenges that are being faced in the twenty-first century.

  • 11.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Corruption, globalisation and business ethics: A metatheoretical approach2010In: Organizational immunity to corruption: building theoretical and research foundations / [ed] Agata Stachowicz-Stanusch, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2010, p. 69-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    "Every today was a tomorrow": An integral method for indexing the social mediation of preferred futures2008In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The visions we hold of the future, whether they are of utopias or dystopias, are not simply a matter of personal imagination. Our conceptions of the future are mediated to us as much as they are privately created by us. To this point, futures studies have not developed an integrative and broad-based framework for considering the social mediation of futures. Understanding how social mediation impacts on our futures visioning requires an interpretive framework that can cope with the multilayered nature of futures visions, the worldviews that are associated with them and a theory of mediation that can be applied within such a context of 'depth'. Using theory-building methodology, the current paper attempts this task by describing a theory of social mediation that builds on the integral futures framework. An application of the framework explores the relationship between various scenarios of health care futures, their associated worldviews and the mediational factors that influence our visions of future health care systems.

  • 13. Edwards, Mark G.
    Good for business: An integral theory perspective on spirituality in organisations2005In: Spirituality in Leadership and Management JournalArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the hallmarks of successful organisations and community leaders of the future will be the capacity to develop more holistic and spiritual understandings of people in the workplace. This understanding of spirituality includes not only the personal spirituality of individuals but also of corporate ethics and morality, cultural diversity, organisational values, social responsibility, communal concerns and environmental awareness. Given the complexity of this contemporary understanding of spirituality in the workplace, how can organisations and leaders make sense of such a concept? Ken Wilber's Integral theory provides a framework for this task. Integral theory is an comprehensive approach to social change that is ideally suited to investigating complex social entities and constructs. Using the model, various definitions and perspectives of spirituality are presented in personal, leadership and collective contexts. Some implications of this new approach are discussed.

  • 14.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Growth, transformation and organisational purpose2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Edwards, Mark G.
    Healing the half-world: Ideology and the emancipatory potential of meta-level social science2016In: Metatheory for the twenty-first century: critical realism and integral theory in dialogue, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 69-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16. Edwards, Mark G.
    Integrating plurality: towards an integral perspective on leadership and organisation2008In: 21st century management: A reference handbook. Vol. 2 / [ed] Charles Wankel, London: Sage Publications, 2008, p. 311-322Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Introduction2013In: Marketing strategy casebook / [ed] Mark Edwards & Alvin Lee, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    "Jobs and Growth": An Inquiry into the transformation of organisational purpose2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mapping resilience: Metatheoretical reflections2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mapping resilience theory: A metatheoretical exploration2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience theory has an extensive research history and has appeared in many forms in different research schools over the decades. As a means for understanding the adaptive capacities of complex human and ecological systems, each expression of resilience theory has something to contribute to its contemporary usage. For example, the social disciplines have brought transformation perspectives, ideas of growth through adversity and the identification of resilient qualities. The health disciplines have contributed process-related notions of resilience as relational and involving socio-cultural contexts for improving quality of life. The environmental sciences have emphasised system dynamics, non-linearity, thresholds and temporal and spatial scales. In this paper I map these contributions and the development of resilience theory from a metatheoretical and transdisciplinary perspective. The aim here was not to review theories of resilience but to systematically chart the definitive architectonics, that is, the key theoretical constructs and their relationships, of schools of resilience thinking across various disciplines and research paradigms. Using an adapted version of the multiparadigm method known as metatriangulation, I analysed literature reviews of resilience theory from different disciplines to identify conceptual lenses and their systemic relationships. This architectonic-centred analysis resulted in a number of metatheoretical frameworks that identify: i) explicit and implicit lenses, ii) conceptual strengths and weakness, and iii) opportunities for transdisciplinary integration of resilience constructs. Although it has a reputation for speculative abstractness, metatheoretical research can be useful for the practical task of assessing assumptions in theories on the causes and cures of social problems. Hence, this kind of research has relevance to the complex questions and big challenges that the Anthropocene is throwing up. I conclude with a discussion of the implications of this metatheoretical mapping for the future development of resilience theory and its application to the global challenges of the Anthropocene.

  • 21.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Marketing for transformational futures: The case of Marshalls PLC2013In: Marketing strategy casebook / [ed] Mark Edwards & Alvin Lee, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, p. 75-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Metatheorising transformational management: A relational approach2009In: Cybernetics and systems theory in management: Tools, views, and advancements, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2009, p. 127-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate management is facing a world full of transformational challenges. How might theory development contribute to a more transformative vision of management? While there have been attempts by theorists to move beyond conventional conceptualizations, more innovative and, in particular, more integrative theoretical frameworks are still needed. Conventional and new paradigm management theories take contending sides in the change debate and often define their approaches in terms of dichotomous oppositions. Using an integrative approach to metatheory building, this article proposes that the application of a relational lens overcomes many common polarities and oppositions present within current theorisings. The relational qualities that emerge from this metatheoretical approach are presented as useful guides for developing innovative theories that address the operational and transformational challenges of 21st century management. The metatheoretical analysis not only provides an integrative framework for exploring more visionary conceptualisations of management it also shows that metatheorising has powerful critical capacities for assessing scientific theories in the social sciences.

  • 23.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Misunderstanding metatheorizing2014In: Systems research and behavioral science, ISSN 1092-7026, E-ISSN 1099-1743, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 720-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metatheorizing is an important but generally poorly understood genre of social science inquiry that has particular relevance to systems research. In this paper, I define and present the major characteristics of metatheoretical research, discuss why it is neglected as a form of research and how it is often misunderstood and inadequately represented in the systems and management science literature. I illustrate the discussion with some examples of misunderstanding of metatheorizing from the systems science literature. I also make some recommendations for how researchers can improve their own metatheorizing and so, hopefully, help this important form of research become more widely acknowledged and critically appreciated.

  • 24.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Organizational transformation for sustainability: An integral metatheory2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 21st century organizations will undergo a level of radical and global change that has rarely been seen before. This transformation will come as a result of the environmental, social and economic challenges that now confront organisations in all their activities. But are our understandings and theories of change up to the task of meeting these challenges? Will we be able to develop sustaining visions of how organizations might contribute to the long-term viability of our interdependent global communities? Organizational Transformation for Sustainability: An Integral Metatheory offers some innovative answers to the big questions involved in organizational sustainability and the radical changes that organizations will need to undergo as we move into the third millennium. This new approach comes from the emerging field of integral metatheory. Edwards shows how a "Big Picture" view of organisational transformation can contribute to our understanding of, and search for, organisational sustainability. There are four key themes to the book: i) the need for integrative metatheories for organisational change; ii) the development of a general research method for building metatheory; iii) the description of an integral metatheory for organisational sustainability; and iv) the discussion of the implications of this metatheory for organisational change and social policy regarding sustainability. This book brings a unique and important orienting perspective to these issues.

  • 25. Edwards, Mark G.
    Seeking wisdom: A transdisciplinary perspective on Australian indigenous practices and planetary management2016In: Development and sustainability: The challenge of social change / [ed] Alberto Cimadamore, Maurice Mittelmark, Gro Therese Lie, and Fungisai P. Gwanzura Ottemöller, London: Zed Books, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Integral Leadership Centre, Graduate School of Management, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    The integral holon: A holonomic approach to organisational change and transformation2005In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 269-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Over the past two decades there has been a growing recognition of the need to develop integrative approaches to understanding and explaining organisational change. One of the barriers to achieving this has been the lack of an integrative theoretical framework that can cope with the multiple demands of researching and explaining organisational change across diverse domains. To meet this challenge a holonomic framework for the study of organisational change is proposed. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the suitability of the holon construct as the basis for a multilevel and multi-paradigm framework for the study of organisational change.

    Design/methodology/approach - Arthur Koestler's holon construct and the developmental principles of Ken Wilber's AQAL framework are used as foundations for developing the framework. To this end theory building techniques are used to describe how the holon construct can accommodate the essential explanatory characteristics of ten paradigms commonly used in organisational studies.

    Findings - The holonomic framework described here possesses significant integrative capacity by demonstrating its ability to incorporate multiple concepts from a diversity of organisational fields.

    Originality/value - It has the potential to contribute significantly to the integrative investigation of change across many levels and domains of organisational activity.

  • 27. Edwards, Mark G.
    Visions of sustainability: An integrative metatheory for management eduction2009In: Management education for global sustainability / [ed] Charles Wankel & James Arthur Finch Stoner, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2009, p. 51-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Vygotsky’s warning: General science and the need for metalevel research2016In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over ninety years ago Lev Vygotsky warned of a growing crisis in psychology and social science research. Vygotsky’s warning has been echoed on many occasions but his solution to the problem has not been widely acknowledged. He advocated for a form of meta-science which he called “general science”, an integrative science that could connect and guide the development of specialised disciplines and schools of research. In this paper I explore the parallels between Vygotsky’s general science and contemporary forms of meta-level research and discuss their relevance and implications for addressing global challenges.

  • 29.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia.
    Wisdom and integrity: Metatheoretical perspectives on integrative change in an age of turbulence2013In: A handbook of practical wisdom: Leadership, organization and integral business practice / [ed] Wendelin Küpers and David J. Pauleen, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Ltd., 2013, p. 197-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Alcaraz, Jose M.
    Berlin School of Creative Leadership, Germany.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Management education and earth system science: Transformation as if planetary boundaries mattered2018In: Business & society, ISSN 0007-6503, E-ISSN 1552-4205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earth system science (ESS) has identified worrying trends in the human impact on fundamental planetary systems. In this conceptual article, we discuss the implications of this research for business schools and management education (ME). We argue that ESS findings raise significant concerns about the relationship between business and nature and, consequently, a radical reframing is required to embed economic and social activity within the global sustainability of natural systems. This has transformative implications for ME. To illustrate this reframing, we apply the ESS lenses of social-ecological interdependence, multiscalar relations, environmental governance, and environmental values to the ME functional domains of institutional purpose, social context and engagement, pedagogical practice, curricular design, and research focus. Our work contributes to the literature on business education for sustainability and the business-society-nature nexus. We explore and apply key ESS findings and concepts, discuss normative implications of these ideas, and offer guidance on transformational pathways for business schools and ME.

  • 31.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    Business School, The University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Kirkham, Nin
    Department of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia, Australia .
    Situating 'giving voice to values': A metatheoretical evaluation of a new approach to business ethics2014In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 477-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evaluation of new theories and pedagogical approaches to business ethics is an essential task for ethicists. This is true not only for empirical and applied evaluation but also for metatheoretical evaluation. However, while there is increasing interest in the practical utility and empirical testing of ethical theories, there has been little systematic evaluation of how new theories relate to existing ones or what novel conceptual characteristics they might contribute. This paper aims to address this lack by discussing the role of metatheorising in assessing new approaches to ethics. The approach is illustrated through evaluating a new pedagogy and curriculum for ethics education called Giving Voice to Values (GVV). Our method involves identifying a number of metatheoretical lenses from existing reviews of ethical theories and applying these to examine GVV's conceptual elements. Although GVV has been explicitly presented as a pedagogy and teaching curriculum, we argue that it has the potential to contribute significantly to the development of ethical theory. We discuss the general implications of this metatheoretical method of evaluation for new approaches to business ethics and for GVV and its future development.

  • 32.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Alvin
    Deakin University, Victoria, Australia.
    Marketing strategy casebook2013Book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    The University of Western Australia.
    Soo, Christine
    The University of Western Australia.
    Greckhamer, Thomas
    Louisiana State University.
    Public value management: A case study of transitional change in disability sector reform in Western Australia2016In: Australian journal of public administration, ISSN 0313-6647, E-ISSN 1467-8500, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 176-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the study of public value management (PVM). PVM is distinguished from other approaches to public administration in its focus on establishing community networks and collaborative capacity building for the creation of public value. We explore PVM through a case study of a public-community sector partnership strategy called the positive behaviour framework (PBF), a state government initiative designed to transform services for people with disabilities. The development and implementation of the PBF is analysed via a transitional change or 'sector awareness' model. Each phase of the model is illustrated through 'positive stories' that depict key moments in the change process and in the activities that public sector managers employed to raise awareness, build capacity, and promote collaboration. We discuss the implications of the study for disability sector change management and for the further study of the PVM approach to public sector administration. This paper contributes to the study of Public Value Management (PVM). We explore PVM through a case study of a public-community sector partnership strategy. We discuss the implications of the study for disability sector change management and for the further study of the PVM.

  • 34.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Webb, David A.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Chappell, Stacie
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Gentile, Mary C.
    Babson College, United States.
    Giving voice to values: A new perspective on ethics in globalised organisational environments2011In: Ethical models and applications of globalization: Cultural, socio-political and economic perspectives / [ed] Charles Wankel and Shaun Malleck, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2011, p. 160-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a multilevel approach to the practical expression of core values and ethical commitments in a globalised world. GVV is an innovative approach to business ethics that offers a way of implementing and expressing ethical values at the micro, meso, and macro levels of social interaction. In this chapter we describe the GVV approach and show how it can be applied both theoretically and practically to the task of expressing our shared values from the personal all the way to the global level of ethical concerns.

  • 35.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    Business School, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Webb, David A.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Chappell, Stacie
    Western New England University, United States.
    Kirkham, Nin
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Gentile, Mary C.
    Babson College, United States.
    Voicing possibilities: A performative approach to the theory and practice of ethics in a globalised world2015In: Handbook of research on business ethics and corporate responsibilities / [ed] Daniel E. Palmer, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 249-275Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Business ethics is witnessing the emergence of new activity-based, communicative approaches to ethics theory and pedagogy that go beyond the conventional normative-descriptive distinction. The authors call this emergent approach "performative ethics" and recognise it as a fundamentally innovative new orientation towards theorising and teaching ethics. They apply this notion of performative ethics to the topic of sustainability, and illustrate their discussion using "Giving Voice to Values" (GVV). GVV is an innovative approach that focuses on implementing ethical values and how they might be expressed at multiple levels of organisational life. The challenge of intergenerational sustainability requires a multilevel orientation to the practical expression of core values in a globalised world. To illustrate this, the authors present three short case studies and explore them from a GVV perspective. They show how GVV can be applied, both theoretically and practically, to the task of expressing and acting on shared values for developing sustaining and sustainable personal, organisational, and global futures.

  • 36.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    et al.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Webb, David A.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Chappell, Stacie
    Western New England University, United States.
    Kirkham, Nin
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Gentile, Mary C.
    Babson College, United States.
    Voicing possibilities: A performative approach to the theory and practice of ethics in a globalised world2016In: Leadership and personnel management: Concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications, Hersey, PA: IGI Global, 2016, Vol. 4, p. 1955-1981Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business ethics is witnessing the emergence of new activity-based, communicative approaches to ethics theory and pedagogy that go beyond the conventional normative-descriptive distinction. The authors call this emergent approach "performative ethics" and recognise it as a fundamentally innovative new orientation towards theorising and teaching ethics. They apply this notion of performative ethics to the topic of sustainability, and illustrate their discussion using "Giving Voice to Values" (GVV). GVV is an innovative approach that focuses on implementing ethical values and how they might be expressed at multiple levels of organisational life. The challenge of intergenerational sustainability requires a multilevel orientation to the practical expression of core values in a globalised world. To illustrate this, the authors present three short case studies and explore them from a GVV perspective. They show how GVV can be applied, both theoretically and practically, to the task of expressing and acting on shared values for developing sustaining and sustainable personal, organisational, and global futures.

  • 37.
    Küpers, Wendelin
    et al.
    Karlshochschule International University, Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Deeg, Jürgen
    University of Hagen, Germany.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    ‘Inter-bridging’: Bridges and bridging as metaphors for ‘syn-integrality’ in organization studies and practice2015In: Integral Review, ISSN 1553-3069, E-ISSN 1553-3069, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 117-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By interpreting the bridge as a relational metaphor, and reflecting an interrelational ‘space between’ of positions, the paper contributes to a different view of integrating pluralism in organization studies. Following an embodied realism, first bridges and bridging are presented as phenomena, media and metaphors for connecting and separating. Showing their ambivalent character the role of bridges as metaphors and metaphors as bridges are discussed in relation to organisation studies and as transition zones for paradigms. Based on an integrative orientation, mediating qualities of bridges and bridging are outlined for gaining a decentered, but interconnected understanding of organising. The final part discusses some implications for organization studies.

  • 38.
    Lee, Alvin
    et al.
    Deakin University, Victoria, Australia.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Marketing strategy: Towards a new paradigm for sustaining forms of marketing2013Book (Other academic)
  • 39. Soo, Christine
    et al.
    Chen, Shannon
    Edwards, Mark G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    A knowledge-based approach to public value management: A case study of change implementation in disability services in Western Australia2018In: Australian journal of public administration, ISSN 0313-6647, E-ISSN 1467-8500, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 187-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a knowledge‐based perspective to understanding public value management (PVM). As distinct from other approaches to public administration, PVM focuses on collaborative capacity building for the creation of public value. To develop the notion of PVM further, we explore the role of a knowledge‐based strategy in a case study of change implementation in 18 disability service organisations in Western Australia. Our findings show important inter‐relationships between knowledge management strategy, adopting a person‐centred approach to service provision, and sustainability of change implementation. We discuss the implications of the study for disability sector change management and for the further exploration of the strategic role of knowledge management capabilities in the study and practice of PVM in public sector administration. The paper explores the relationship between an organisation's knowledge capture and sharing systems and processes and its ability to implement change in a way that generates long‐term benefits for both public sector employees (e.g., engaging with key stakeholders to generate innovative solutions for serving client needs) and clients (i.e., increased well‐being through better service design and support).

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-05 00:00
  • 40.
    Stachowicz-Stanusch, Agata
    et al.
    The Silesian University of Technology.
    Edwards, Mark G.
    University of Western Australia, Business School.
    Gumennaia, Alexandra
    National University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”.
    Gunn, Alastair
    University of Waikato.
    Organizations’ anti-corruption declarations and reporting practices from multi-culture perspectives – research report summary2009In: Journal of Intercultural Management, ISSN 2080-0150, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 30-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few years the issue of corruption has attracted renewed interest both among academics and policymakers. Today corruption is acknowledged to be a key factor in preventing development in large areas of the world, and accordingly a vast array of projects and tools have been developed to fight it effectively and to build a strong organizational system of immunity to corruption. The study of corruption and its effect on the workplace has become one of the 21st centuries’ most exciting and burgeoning fields of research.Public statements on anti-corruption policies and reporting practices are one of the crucial steps in a company’s anti-corruption activities. Open declarations of this kind encourage the development of management systems which helps companies to “walk the talk”. The main purpose of this paper is to look at anti-corruption materials published on the websites of the biggest companies in Australia, New Zealand, Poland and Ukraine. One of the foundations of any anti-corruption policy is its visibility both inside and outside organization. In this paper we present the results of international research about organizations’ anti-corruption declarations and reporting practices.

1 - 40 of 40
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