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  • 1. Anderson, R. B.
    et al.
    Camp II, R. D.
    Dana, L. P.
    Honig, Benson
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, West Waterloo, ON, Canada.
    Nkongolo-Bakenda, J. -M
    Peredo, A. M.
    Indigenous land rights in Canada: The foundation for development2005In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 104-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the middle decades of the 20th Century Indigenous people were the target of efforts to assist in economic development. In large part these externally developed, modernisation based efforts failed. In response, a second wave of Indigenous development has emerged; one in which Indigenous peoples are striving to rebuild their 'nations' and improve their lot through economic development 'on their own terms'. Key to this approach is the pursuit by Indigenous people of the recognition of their rights to their traditional lands and resources. This paper examines the emergence of this second wave of Indigenous development in Canada.

  • 2. Anderson, R. B.
    et al.
    Honig, Benson
    Peredo, A. M.
    Communities in the global economy: Where social and indigenous entrepreneurship meet2006In: Entrepreneurship as Social Change: A Third Movements in Entrepreneurship Book, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2006, p. 56-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Anderson, R. B.
    et al.
    University of Regina, Canada.
    Peredo, A. M.
    University of Victoria, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Dana, L. -O
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Weir, W.
    University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
    The Saskatchewan experience2007In: International Handbook of Research on Indigenous Entrepreneurship / [ed] L.-P. Dana & R. B. Anderson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2007, p. 352-365Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4. Chandler, G. N.
    et al.
    Honig, Benson
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Creation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antecedents, moderators, and performance consequences of membership change in new venture teams2005In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 705-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on initial team size and membership change of new venture teams in two studies: (1) a panel study of 408 emerging ventures, and (2) a cross-sectional study of 124 new ventures. The findings suggest that larger initial team size provides an advantage for new organizations, and that the benefits of adding and dropping team members are contingent on the stage of development of the organization and the dynamism of the environment. Both external environment and team composition factors are associated with turnover in venture teams.

  • 5.
    Christie, Michael J.
    et al.
    Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Social entrepreneurship: New research findings2006In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Davidsson, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Honig, Benson
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel.
    The role of social and human capital among nascent entrepreneurs2003In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 301-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines nascent entrepreneurship by comparing individuals engaged in nascent activities (n=380) with a control group (n=608), after screening a sample from the general population (n=30,427). The study then follows the developmental process of nascent entrepreneurs for 18 months. Bridging and bonding social capital, consisting of both strong and weak ties, was a robust predictor for nascent entrepreneurs, as well as for advancing through the start-up process. With regard to outcomes like first sale or showing a profit, only one aspect of social capital, viz. being a member of a business network, had a statistically significant positive effect. The study supports human capital in predicting entry into nascent entrepreneurship, but only weakly for carrying the start-up process towards successful completion.

  • 7.
    De Clercq, D.
    et al.
    Brock University, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Martin, B.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    The roles of learning orientation and passion for work in the formation of entrepreneurial intention2013In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 652-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to extend understanding of the drivers that underlie entrepreneurial intention formation, this article investigates the hitherto underexplored roles of people's learning orientation and passion for work. It considers how these personal characteristics may moderate the instrumentality of their perceived ability to become a successful entrepreneur, and perceptions of the attractiveness of becoming an entrepreneur. Using a survey of 946 university students, it finds that learning orientation and passion for work invigorate the role of these feasibility and desirability considerations in enhancing entrepreneurial intention. A follow-up analysis reveals that the moderating effects of learning orientation and passion for work on the perceived attractiveness-entrepreneurial intention relationship are stronger to the extent that people value the intrinsic goal of autonomy in their future career more, but these moderating effects are immune to the importance of the extrinsic goal of earning financial rewards. Several implications for research and practice emerge.

  • 8.
    de Clercq, Dirk
    et al.
    Faculty of Business, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Entrepreneurship as an integrating mechanism for disadvantaged persons2011In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 23, no 5-6, p. 353-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper theorises about a specific facet of social entrepreneurship, namely, the integration of disadvantaged persons into the field of entrepreneurship. Drawing from Bourdieu's theory of practice, the authors conceive of this integration as a power-laden process that reflects normative expectations imposed by field incumbents on entrants to the field that require them to both comply with and challenge existing field arrangements. Propositions outline the desirability and ability of disadvantaged persons to meet these expectations. 

  • 9.
    Drori, I.
    et al.
    College of Management, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    A Process Model of Internal and External Legitimacy2013In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 345-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the results of a longitudinal case study depicting the relationship between internal and external legitimacy at Orion, an emergent creative professional firm. We address the following questions: How do different types of legitimacy emerge, and how do they interact to shape organizational evolution? Introducing a staged process model, we demonstrate that organizational legitimacy is a product of action, which is continually reproduced and reconstructed by members of an organization in concert with external legitimation activities. Internal and external legitimacy evolve through a process of emergence, validation, diffusion and consensus, sometimes recursively repeating the cycle when imbalances result in conflict and friction.

  • 10.
    Drori, I.
    et al.
    College of Management, School of Business Administration, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfrid Laurier University, School of Business and Economics, Canada.
    Ginsberg, A.
    New York University, Stern School of Business, United States.
    Transnational Entrepreneurship: Toward a unifying theoretical framework2006In: Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to develop a unifying analytical framework to advance the study of Transnational Entrepreneurship (TE), which refers to the processes of creating and growing new business ventures across national boundaries by social actors. We first examine relevant research literatures and theoretical perspectives and identify the limitations of each in analyzing the process of TE. We then introduce a new theoretical lens for studying TE that is grounded in the theory of practice and the concept of "habitus", which refers to aspects of culture that are anchored in the body of daily practices of individuals, groups, societies, and nations. Our proposed analytical framework views TE as a social realm of immigrants who operate in a complex, cross-national habitus, consisting of dual cultural, institutional and economic features from which actors can formulate their entrepreneurial strategies of action. We show how this framework integrates perspectives that focus on actors' motivation and behavior, cultural values and norms, institutional fields, political meaning and consequences, and social capital and network formation. We conclude by developing theoretical propositions and recommendations for future research.

  • 11.
    Drori, Israel
    et al.
    School of Business, College of Management, Academic Studies, Rishon LeZion, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Lampel, Joseph
    Cass Business School, City University London, United Kingdom.
    Ingenuity research: Current problems and future prospects2014In: Handbook of Organizational and Entrepreneurial Ingenuity / [ed] B. Honig, J. Lampel & I. Drori, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 289-297Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Drori, Israel
    et al.
    College of Management Academic Studies, School of Business Administration, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
    Sheaffer, Zachary
    Open University of Israel, Ra'anana, Israel.
    The life cycle of an internet firm: Scripts, legitimacy, and identity2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 715-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study, longitudinally and ethnographically, the construction of legitimacy and identity during the life cycle of an entrepreneurial Internet firm, from inception to death. We utilize organizational scripts to examine how social actors enact identity and legitimacy, maintaining that different scripts, both contested and consent-oriented, become the source of action for acquiring legitimacy and creating organizational identity. We show that scripts enable entrepreneurs and other social actors to invoke a set of interactions within and outside the organization. Scripts construct values and interests, form social bonding and consented actions, and eventually shape and reshape the individual and institutional contexts of identity and legitimacy. We found that the strategic action of organizational members in pursuing and enacting their preferred scripts depends on their position and role in the organization. We observed that the institutionalization of simultaneously competing scripts created a path-dependent process leading to organizational conflict and eventual failure. 

  • 13.
    Drori, Israel
    et al.
    College of Management, School of Business, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
    Wright, Mike
    Center for Management Buyout Research, Nottingham University Business School, United Kingdom.
    Transnational entrepreneurship: An emergent field of study2009In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1001-1022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces the reader to the scope, boundaries, variation, and theoretical lenses of transnational entrepreneurship (TE) research. We discuss issues concerning why, how, and when individuals and/or organizations pursue new business ventures, often in far less attractive environments, while relying on abilities and opportunities stemming from the exploitation of resources, both social and economic, in more than one country. We compare TE with international entrepreneurs, ethnic entrepreneurs, and returnee entrepreneurs. TE is considered from several perspectives: agency, institutional, cultural, power relations, and social capital and networks. We summarize the articles presented in this special issue and outline an agenda for further research.

  • 14.
    Gedajlovic, E.
    et al.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Moore, C. B.
    Rawls College of Business, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States.
    Payne, G. T.
    Rawls College of Business, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States.
    Wright, M.
    Imperial College Business School, University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Social Capital and Entrepreneurship: A Schema and Research Agenda2013In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 455-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue considers past and current research on "Social Capital and Entrepreneurship" to develop a schema and an associated research agenda. With the general goal of establishing social capital as a foundational theory of entrepreneurship, we discuss how future research can utilize social capital perspectives across levels of analysis and contexts to explain a wide variety of entrepreneurship phenomena.

  • 15.
    Honig, Benson
    University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Human capital and structural upheaval: A study of manufacturing firms in the west bank2001In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 575-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms in various worldwide locations are repeatedly subjected to radical political, economic, and social upheavals, including changes in administrative governance, new economic paradigms, natural disasters, and warfare. Perhaps because of the difficulty of conducting research in these environments, little is known regarding the unique requirements of entrepreneurs and their business organizations in such troubled locations. Reliable research and information is necessary in order to design and assess methods of providing institutional support both during, and after, such turmoil. Based on data collected from field interviews over a six-month period, this article examines the characteristics of the owners of 64 small manufacturing businesses that have undergone or were experiencing radical political and economic upheaval in the West Bank town of Ramallah in the Palestinian Territories. The objective of the study is to examine characteristics that influence and assist an entrepreneur's resource allocation decision-making processes. This was done by comparatively assessing the effects on profitability of both firm and individual assets in a highly constrained rapidly changing environment. Understanding this allocation process will lead to more effective targeted assistance in regions experiencing or exiting environmental transitions and upheavals. Human capital theory is utilized in this study as a framework for understanding the comparative response of owners to reallocate resources under the stressful environment of the pre- and post-intifada West Bank territories. While human capital has been well studied in literature examining resource allocation in "typical" competitive environments, our understanding of the influence of human capital in transitional environments is quite limited. This study provides some useful, and perhaps surprising results, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Owner's human capital (coded from formal education) was found to impact profitability only with the micro firms studied (those with three or fewer employees), however, it is possible that this finding reflects dilution of human capital in comparatively larger small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). One interesting departure from similar studies is that experience was not found to affect the profitability of the firm. Plant capital, on the other hand, was found to be associated with the profitability of only larger SMEs, controlling for business age and experience of the owner. This finding is significant because, presently, institutions such as the World Bank, NGOs and national development agencies focus their efforts primarily on providing credit to small businesses, whereas training and education currently are somewhat out of favor. A model is proposed in this study comparing resource requirements according to both the size and the productivity/technological level of the firm. The object is to explain the reduced importance of human capital and experience in environments of radical transition, specifically the arbitrary nature and lack of predictability of transitional governance, and the increased importance of financial capital only with large SMEs. It is argued that skills acquired in functional expertise do not necessarily prepare an entrepreneur for the abrupt environmental transformations characteristic of tumultuous political events. This research suggests that owners are in a better position to maximize their cognitive skills in decision making within smaller organizations. However, these skills are naturally diffused and so less effective at influencing the outcomes of somewhat larger organizations. Larger SMEs are necessarily more capital intensive and more bureaucratic, and so the cumulative human capital at the organizational level may be more important to allocative efficiency than the human capital of the individual firm owner. Further, larger SMEs require organizational expertise that may not be captured in the individual level characteristics of entrepreneurs. This research suggests that efforts to support such environments should carefully consider the size of the firms in question before designing and implementing programs of assistance, differentiating microenterprises from small businesses. In particular, the findings of this study suggest that smaller firms experiencing rapid environmental upheaval will benefit most from formal education, training and advice. Larger firms, in contrast, appear to benefit most from loans providing traditional capital support, and from advice across the entire firm's human capital base, particularly regarding organizational management and delegation skills. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  • 16.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Canada.
    Institutionalization of the field and its impact on both the ethics and the quality of entrepreneurship research in the coming decades2015In: Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 123-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Canada.
    Planning For Entrepreneurial Finance And Capital: A Critical Review Of The Importance Of Teaching Business Planning2012In: The Oxford Handbook of Entrepreneurial Finance / [ed] Douglas Cumming, Oxford University Press, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article broadly reviews the history of planning, its successes and failures, existing research on planning, and the theoretical and cultural underpinnings by which planning takes place. It reflects the profound and ubiquitous triumph of the planning paradigm in the twentieth (and now twentyfirst) century. It provides material adjudicating the validity of using, or not using, one or another planning technique, and suggests alternative procedures to eliminate possible time-wasting bureaucratic routines, constraints on organizational action, and losses resulting from myopia frequently introduced by the planning process. The objective of this article is to illuminate an area of human activity that, to date, has been largely ignored by scholarly study.

  • 18.
    Honig, Benson
    Tel Aviv International School of Management, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    What determines success?: Examining the human, financial, and social capital of Jamaican microentrepreneurs1998In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 371-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the performance of 215 informal microenterprises in Jamaica, studying the influence of human capital, social capital, and financial capital of the owners on their business profitability. Understanding the importance of particular relationships that result in successful micro-businesses is important for a number of reasons. First, among many developing countries, the growth of microenterprise provides the most visibly vibrant and growing economic activity. Although considerable effort and resources are being directed toward microenterprise promotion schemes, empirical research on the subject is quite limited. Second, economies in developing countries mirror many of the social and institutional problems existent in urban economically disadvantaged areas of the United States and other developed countries. For these areas, microenterprise may be an essential component of urban renewal and community development. This study helps in identifying important characteristics of social and individual attributes that may be relevant to those attempting to strengthen this subsector. Finally, this study seeks to provide insight into a dimension of microbusiness research for which there are limited data, specifically, the role that social capital plays among practicing entrepreneurs and owners. This research found that different structural environments, even within a singular and small economy, may considerably alter the rates of return to human, social, and financial capital. As a result, the analysis of enterprises includes segmentation according to both the usage, or not, of employees, and the sophistication of the technologies used. Several factors were determined to enhance the profitability of the businesses in all categories. Vocational training, for example, demonstrated consistently strong and positive effects. Mother's high occupational status (a proxy for socioeconomic status) and years of experience in the business were also consistently positive and strongly associated with increasing profits. Although additional starting capital played an important role for both the businesses with and without employees, increasing amounts failed to differentiate the success of those firms that were already operating in the higher technological tier. Obtaining a small business loan acted in a similar manner, enhancing the profitability of all firms, except those segmented into a high technological tier. One interpretation of this finding is that the role of technological choice is extremely important, and appears to dwarf that of varying amounts of starting capital. Social capital, as operationalized by frequent church attendance and marital status of the owner, was found generally to increase the profitability of the business. The data demonstrate that social networks play an important role in the success of these businesses, and that conditions in the highest tier utilize social capital in a somewhat unique manner.

  • 19.
    Honig, Benson
    Department of Management, St. Andrews University, St. Katharine's West The Scores, St. Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom.
    Who gets the goodies?: An examination of microenterprise credit in Jamaica1998In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 313-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the lending decisions made by microenterprise credit support programmes in Jamaica, focusing on what types of owners of firms successfully obtain loans. Utilizing agency theory, human capital and social capital theories, the study examines what types of borrowers successfully navigate the credit market nurtured by non-governmental organizations (NGOs). It is based on field research comparing five organizations, evaluating the loan process and characteristics of each lender, with a study of their market, utilizing interviews conducted with entrepreneurs of 254 informal sector firms. The study first describes and examines the organizational character of the loan agencies, to discern their effect on the loan granting process. Subsequent analysis examines the characteristics of those individuals who received loans, and compares them with those who did not. The research shows that the behaviour of NGO microenterprise credit institutions in Jamaica conform closely to predictions based on agency theory, behaving very differently from banks, credit unions, informal lending associations and families. Although the bureaucratic mechanisms and organizational goals and objectives were found to be quite similar among the five different NGO credit agencies studied, each lender varied considerably in their tacit selection criteria of their clientele. The research underscores the importance of social capital and human capital on the lending process. 

  • 20.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Acquaah, Moses
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States.
    Sustainable management and managing sustainability: The continued challenges of the African continent2016In: Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0825-0383, E-ISSN 1936-4490, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 177-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, United States.
    Bedi, A.
    Bishop's University, United States.
    The fox in the hen house: A critical examination of plagiarism among members of the academy of management2012In: Academy of Management Learning & Education, ISSN 1537-260X, E-ISSN 1944-9585, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on academic plagiarism has typically focused on students as the perpetrators of unethical behaviors, and less attention has been paid to academic researchers as likely candidates for such behaviors. We examined 279 papers presented at the International Management division of the 2009 Academy of Management conference for the purpose of studying plagiarism among academics. Results showed that 25% of our sample had some amount of plagiarism, and over 13% exhibited significant plagiarism. This exploratory study raises an alarm regarding the inadequate monitoring of norms and professional activities associated with Academy of Management members.

  • 22.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada.
    Black, Elizabeth Leslie
    The University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom.
    The industrial revolution and beyond: Two hundred years of entrepreneurship and "dis-entrepreneurship" in a small Scottish town2007In: Journal of Management History, ISSN 1751-1348, E-ISSN 1758-7751, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 269-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine empirically a previously overlooked aspect of entrepreneurship: community "dis-entrepreneurship". Through the lens of political and historical theory, the authors propose learning from unusual circumstances of failure in order to inform social policy regarding factors that facilitate community entrepreneurship.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on political and economic theory, formulating propositions that are tested using interpretive methods.

    Findings: Strong patron-client relations were found to negatively impact the formation of diversity and meritocracy necessary for entrepreneurial environments to thrive. They also account for an inward orientation that negatively influenced investments in infrastructure. Path dependent processes were found to hold sway regarding the stability of political/social norms.

    Originality/value: This is the first paper of which the authors are aware that considers issues related to community dis-entrepreneurship. The paper highlights the importance of effective community leadership.

  • 23.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    Stanford University, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Drori, Israel
    College of Management, Rishon Le Zion, Israel.
    A review of related streams of immigration and global entrepreneurship research2010In: Transnational and Immigrant Entrepreneurship in a Globalized World / [ed] B. Honig, I. Drori & B. Carmichael, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010, p. 224-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    Stanford University, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Drori, IsraelCollege of Management, Rishon Le Zion, Israel.Carmichael, BarbaraWilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
    Transnational and immigrant entrepreneurship in a globalized world2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational entrepreneurs are individuals who migrate from one country to another, concurrently maintaining business-related linkages with their countries of origin and their adopted countries and communities. Once thought of as contributing primarily to ethnic enterprise and small business, they are recognized now as playing a leading role around the world in important start-ups and high technology ventures. Transnational and Immigrant Entrepreneurship in a Globalized World brings together leading international scholars from a cross-disciplinary basis to examine the economic, social, regulatory, technological, and theoretical issues related to the impact of transnational entrepreneurs on business and economic development. Drawing on the work of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu and other international perspectives, the scholars in this volume examine both theory and case studies to discuss how entrepreneurial activity relates to international business, economic development, and the institutional and regulatory implications of globalization. 

  • 25.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    Stanford University, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Drori, Israel
    College of Management, Rishon Le Zion, Israel.
    Ginsberg, A.
    New York University, United States.
    Researching transnational entrepreneurship: An approach based on the theory of practice2010In: Transnational and Immigrant Entrepreneurship in a Globalized World, University of Toronto Press, 2010, p. 28-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Hopp, Christian
    RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    New venture planning and lean start-up activities: A longitudinal empirical study of entrepreneurial success, founder preferences and venture context2016In: Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches / [ed] Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 75-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we examine two theorized approaches to entrepreneurial activity: experiential versus prediction based strategies. We empirically assess the comparative performance of several commonly recommended approaches researching customer needs, researching the competitive landscape, writing a business plan, conceptually adapting the business plan or experimentally adapting the primary business activity. We foundthat the majority of nascent entrepreneurs began with a business plan, but only about a third adapted their plan in later stages. We also found that talking with customers and examining the competitive landscape were normative activities. Those who started a plan were more likely to create a venture, although the effects much stronger for those who changed their plan later on, as well as for those who researched customer needs. Our results show that the selection of these activities is both ubiquitous and driven by pre-start-up experience and new venture characteristics. The activities themselves do not robustly link with successful new venture foundation. Hence, pre-start-up experiences, venture characteristics, and the institutional environment are more important in explaining successful performance than recommended activities. Implications for research, practice, and pedagogy are discussed.

  • 27.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    Graduate School of Business, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Institutitonal forces and the written business plan2004In: Journal of Management, ISSN 0149-2063, E-ISSN 1557-1211, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 29-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined factors that led nascent organizations to write business plans, following 396 nascent entrepreneurs during a two-year period. We examined both the production and the outcomes of written business plans produced in nascent organizations. Our findings show that institutional variables, such as coercion and mimetic forces, are important predictors influencing the propensity of new organizations to write business plans. Our results are contrary to rationalist predictions of planning-performance, and are more in line with institutional predictions. Interestingly there was no evidence to support positive outcomes, in terms of profitability, for those nascent organizations that produced business plans during a two-year initial period. We discuss the implications for institutional theory and studies of nascent businesses, as well as for the literature on business planning.

  • 28.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Katongole, Celestine
    Makerere University Business School, Kampala, Uganda.
    Perry, Maya
    University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, United States.
    Entrepreneurial promotion and sustainability: The community as a unit of analysis2014In: Advancing research methodology in the African context: Techniques, methods, and designs / [ed] D. B. Zoogah, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 167-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To introduce researchers to useful techniques and methodologies that are effective in the African environment that reflect both the unique context, challenges, and opportunities of community-based research.

    Methodology/approach - We argue that strategic research methods should be utilized that reflect the variation that is found environmentally and geographically. Because the field of strategy emerged in the United States followed by Europe, it lacks an adequate methodology to examine comparative underdevelopment by communities in Africa and the developing world. We provide a case study example of an action research project that highlights an effective way to introduce strategic change at the community level in an African context - a small rural town in Uganda.

    Research limitations - Our example is based on a single case study in Uganda and may or may not have generalizable implications.

    Originality/value - We explain the necessity and the process by which the action research takes place, longitudinally, providing a strategic solution to the problem of behavioral poverty. We introduce our process of community entrepreneurship as an alternative to strategic methods based primarily on existing organizations reflecting resource munificence. We demonstrate the importance of extensive community debate, collaborative decision making, and solidarity in supporting positive action-research outcomes.

  • 29.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Lampel, J.
    City University London, United Kingdom.
    Siegel, D.
    Drnevich, P.
    Ethics in the production and dissemination of management research: Institutional failure or individual fallibility?2014In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 118-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 50 years, we have witnessed considerable growth in business education, increased competition among business schools, and higher expectations for faculty scholarship. Increasing competition among scholars for limited publication opportunities in top-tier journals and the proliferation of bottom-tier journals has given rise to a variety of systemic ethical issues and dilemmas, for scholars and their institutions. In this article, we critically examine the current state of normative publishing activities and expectations, including doctoral education, promotion and tenure processes and research expectations, editorial and peer review processes, academic freedom, acceptable breadth, depth, and accuracy or legitimacy of research designs and methodologies, academic integrity, replication, and data availability concerning the trends and implications of contemporary and future management scholarship. We also provide recommendations for additional research and discussion on these issues.

  • 30.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Lampel, JosephCass Business School, City University London, United Kingdom.Drori, IsraelSchool of Business, College of Management, Academic Studies, Rishon LeZion, Israel.
    Handbook of organizational and entrepreneurial ingenuity2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The editors of this Handbook, Benson Honig, Joseph Lampel and Israel Drori, define organizational ingenuity as 'the ability to create innovative solutions within structural constraints using limited resources and imaginative problem solving'. They and the authors examine the dichotomy between organizational freedom and necessity in order to better understand the role of ingenuity in the success of an organization.

  • 31.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Lerner, M.
    Raban, Y.
    Social capital and the linkages of high-tech companies to the military defense system: Is there a signaling mechanism?2006In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 27, no 4-5, p. 419-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates linkages of new Israeli high-tech companies to the military and defense system. We examine the impact of social capital, signaling, and learning spillovers on resource acquisition in terms of investments and the financial performance of companies with and without linkages. Social capital, signaling, and learning spillovers are examined as they impact individual and organizational resource acquisition and performance of 200 new Israeli high-tech companies. The study contributes to the existing literature of entrepreneurship by suggesting the relevance of knowledge spillovers, signaling theory and social capital to the context of the interface between defense and civilian spheres.

  • 32.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Canada.
    Martin, Bruce
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Entrepreneurship education2014In: Handbook of research on entrepreneurship: What we know and what we need to know / [ed] A. Fayolle, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada.
    Paul Dana, Leo
    College of Business and Economics, University of Canterbury, Sumner, New Zealand.
    Communities of disentrepreneurship: A comparative crossnational examination of entrepreneurial demise2008In: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, ISSN 1750-6204, E-ISSN 1750-6212, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 5-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To examine communities that temporarily demonstrated successful social and economic success, but regressed, or may have cycled through periods marked by unusual success and unusual failure.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The authors analyse events in two communities that have experienced disentrepreneurship.

    Findings

    The authors attribute three main forces accountable for community disentrepreneurship: a failure in community leadership that allows the continuation of path dependent patron-client relationships, peripheralisation resulting from both geographical and infrastructure constraints, and failure to adequately diversify the economic environment. It is believed that further study of communities that have experienced such cycles is both warranted, and essential.

    Practical implications

    A useful source of information for academics as well as for town planners, policy-makers and economists. Originality/value This paper addresses a largely overlooked area of the landscape.

  • 34.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    McMaster University, DeGroote School of Business, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Samuelsson, M.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Data replication and extension: A study of business planning and venture-level performance2014In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We longitudinally examine outcomes of entrepreneurial business planning to assess effectiveness. Both data replication and extension are used to examine previously published research. Our sample consists of 623 nascent ventures that we follow for more than ten years - from 1998 to 2010. Our findings highlight the importance of data replication, data extension, and sample selection bias. We not only add to the debate regarding the merits or liabilities of planning, but also contribute to evaluating normative research and publication standards by reexamining past research using more comprehensive data and an extended time frame.

  • 35.
    Honig, Benson
    et al.
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Canada.
    Samuelsson, M.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Planning and the Entrepreneur: A Longitudinal Examination of Nascent Entrepreneurs in Sweden2012In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 365-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied 623 nascent entrepreneurs during a six-year period, examining how their planning decisions impact venture-level performance. Our study is unique in that we tracked nascent ventures, examining their planning behavior, including changes to plans. Relying on the theory of legitimacy, this paper adds to the scholarly debate over the merits of business planning by examining, longitudinally, the impact of planning during a six-year period, accounting for both pre-emergent nascent activity and post-emergent success factors. We found that neither formal planning nor changes in the business plan increased venture-level performance over the six-year study period.

  • 36. Honig, Benson
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Mikael
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Replication in entrepreneurship research: A further response to Delmar2015In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 3, p. 30-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper continues our debate examining pertinent issues related to scholarship, in particular, whether matters related to technical rigor eclipse the importance of causality, replicability, or that of underlying statistical and methodological assumptions. We report on specific data findings to further stimulate discussion of these important matters.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfrid Laurier University, School of Business and Economics, Waterloo, Ont., Canada.
    Judging a business by its cover: An institutional perspective on new ventures and the business plan2009In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business plans are widely spread among new businesses, and they are supported by various universities, governmental assistance agencies, management consultants and a wide array of literature. Business plans are often taken for granted as highly useful tools that should be frequently updated and used. This study is based on data from six companies and their environments, over five years, using several forms of data collection such as interviews, observations, and archival data. In contrast to previous studies, we found that initial conformity to business plan norms gradually and without exception lead to loose coupling. Entrepreneurs who wrote business plans never updated or rarely referred to their plans after writing them.

  • 38.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Honig, Benson
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Shakked, Leora
    Sadaovski, Arie
    A Cross-National Comparison of Incubated Organizations: An Institutional Perspective2005In: International Entrepreneurship / [ed] Dean A. Shepherd & Jerome A. Katz, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2005, p. 165-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the process of starting new ventures, entrepreneurs typically reallocate existing resources to new uses. These resource reallocations challenge the status quo, and are therefore often viewed with suspicion by others (Aldrich & Fiol, 1994). Thus, entrepreneurs need to convince others that the actions required of their new venture are desirable, proper and/or appropriate - they need to gain legitimacy. Institutional theory holds that new ventures have to conform to institutional pressures in order to gain legitimacy. Legitimacy is essential for the new ventures' chances of survival (cf. Aldrich & Auster, 1986; Aldrich, 1999; Stinchcombe, 1965; Singh, Tucker, & House, 1986). For example, a new venture's reputation facilitates its entry into business networks, which enhances growth (Larson, 1992) and an individual's associations with government agencies and community organizations have positive effects on business founding and survival (Baum & Oliver, 1996). Consequently, institutional theory may lead us to expect that those new ventures that adapt most to institutional pressures would have the greatest chances of success. At the same time, entrepreneurship research suggests that new ventures are more prone than established firms to break away from established patterns of behavior. New ventures have become a major source of innovation and the creation of new technologies (Acs & Audretsch, 1990). These creative organizations and new technologies are difficult for established companies to imitate, leading some new ventures toward industry leadership positions (Utterback, 1994), as well as creating wealth for the owners and the society (Birch, 1987; Dahlqvist, 1998; Davidsson, Lindmark, & Olofsson, 1996; Storey, 1994). Thus, there is an unresolved paradox between the findings of entrepreneurship research that new ventures tend to break established patterns; and institutional theory's focus on the need for conformity to rules and legitimacy. However, recent conceptual developments in institutional theory potentially provide us with tools to resolve this paradox. It has been suggested by many institutional theorists that a more diverse image of organizational responses to institutional pressures must be offered (Beckert, 1999; Judge & Zeithaml, 1992; Oliver, 1991). In this chapter, we utilize such an approach. Organizational responses are influenced by the nature of institutional pressures, the congruence between different institutional pressures facing an organization, the coherence between the institutional pressures and the goals and strategies of the organization, and the extent to which different institutional pressures are enforced; as well as by the overall environment the organization is performing in. A repertoire of organizational responses to institutional pressures is thus conceivable (Oliver, 1991). While recent additions to institutional theory may provide insights into how new ventures deal with institutional pressures, little, if any, empirical research has been done that examines how different institutional fields influence strategic options and outcomes. Recent literature has begun to focus on the various aspects of internationalization of new and small businesses (Oviatt & McDougall, 1994; Wright & Ricks, 1994; Westhead, Wright, & Ucbasaran, 2001). Despite some recent efforts for systematic comparisons between countries (Reynolds, Bygrave, Autio, Cox, & Hay, 2002), most entrepreneurship research analyzes new venture creation and entrepreneurship from a micro-level perspective, taking the local or national institutional environment as given. In this study, we argue for a cross-national comparative framework to better understand how responses to institutional pressures influence young organizations in different institutional fields. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Lampel, J.
    et al.
    City University, London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    Wilfred Laurier University, United Kingdom.
    Let the children play: Muppets in the middle of the middle east2005In: The Business of Culture: Strategic Perspectives on Entertainment and Media, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005, p. 243-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Lampel, J.
    et al.
    Cass Business School, City University London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University College of Management, Canada.
    Drori, I.
    School of Business Administration, Faculty of Management, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
    Discovering Creativity in Necessity: Organizational Ingenuity under Institutional Constraints2012In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 279-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Lampel, J.
    et al.
    City University London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Drori, I.
    College of Management, Academic Studies, Israel.
    Organizational Ingenuity: Concept, Processes and Strategies2014In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction to the special issue we explore the main features of 'organizational ingenuity', defined as 'the ability to create innovative solutions within structural constraints using limited resources and imaginative problem solving'. We begin by looking at the changing views of the importance of ingenuity for economic and social development. We next analyse the nature of ingenious solutions. This is followed by a discussion of structural, resource and temporal constraints that face problem solvers. We next turn our attention to creative problem solving under constraints. We contrast 'induced' and 'autonomous' problem solving. The first arises when external stakeholders or top managers impose tasks that define problems for the individuals and groups that must solve them; the second arises when these individuals and groups recognize and define the problems for themselves. We argue that in both induced and autonomous problem solving, individuals and groups that wish to act creatively confront two types of constraint. The first are 'product constraints' that define the features and functionalities that are necessary for a successful solution. The second are 'process constraints' that stand in the way of creative problem solving in a given organizational context. We argue that both types of constraints can lead to organizational ingenuity, but that dealing with process constraints is crucial for organizational ingenuity, and hence for sustaining organizational ingenuity more generally. We provide an overview summary of the articles in the special issue, and conclude with suggestions for future research.

  • 42.
    Lampel, Joseph
    et al.
    Cass Business School, City University London, United Kingdom.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Drori, Israel
    School of Business, College of Management, Academic Studies, Israel.
    Organizational ingenuity: Insights and overview2014In: Handbook of organizational and entrepreneurial ingenuity / [ed] B. Honig, J. Lampel & I. Drori, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    McNally, Jeffrey J.
    et al.
    Faculty of Business Administration, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada.
    Martin, Bruce C.
    School of Business, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Honig, Benson
    DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Bergmann, H.
    University of St. Gallen, Swiss Research Institute of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Piperopoulos, P.
    Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Toward rigor and parsimony: a primary validation of Kolvereid’s (1996) entrepreneurial attitudes scales2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 358-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questioning the validity of scholarly work is not a typical path to publication in the management field. However, although considerable scholarship assesses entrepreneurial attitudes and intentions models of behaviour, methodological weaknesses in scale development have hampered scholars’ ability to rigorously interpret and build upon their research findings. We review 20 years of research and discover that the pioneer measure of entrepreneurial attitudes as a predictor of self-employment intentions, has yet to be empirically validated. We show that construct and measurement differences, one-off modifications to existing scales and a lack of adequate justification may partially explain why studies in the entrepreneurship education domain have produced inconsistent results. We address this limitation by performing factor analytic techniques on data from two sets of English-speaking university students from two North American countries. The result is a more parsimonious and streamlined ‘mini-Kolvereid’ scale. We further demonstrate that this scale is an effective predictor of entrepreneurial intentions.

  • 44. Peredo, A. M.
    et al.
    Anderson, R. B.
    Galbraith, C. S.
    Honig, Benson
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Wilfred Laurier University, Canada.
    Dana, L. P.
    Towards a theory of indigenous entrepreneurship2004In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous populations throughout the world suffer from chronic poverty, lower education levels, and poor health. The 'second wave' of indigenous development, after direct economic assistance from outside, lies in indigenous efforts to rebuild their 'nations' and improve their lot through entrepreneurial enterprise. This paper suggests that there is a distinguishable kind of activity appropriately called 'indigenous entrepreneurship'. We begin by defining the indigenous population and noting some general facts about their numbers and distribution. In an effort to discern the potential for development on indigenous peoples' own terms, we then explore three frameworks for understanding efforts at development, including indigenous development: modernisation theory, dependency theory and (at somewhat greater length) regulation theory. After distinguishing 'indigenous' from 'ethnic' entrepreneurship, we conclude by identifying a number of lead questions that present themselves at the outset of an enquiry into the nature of indigenous entrepreneurship.

  • 45.
    Sheaffer, Zachary
    et al.
    Department of Management and Economics, Ariel University Centre, Ariel, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Carmeli, Abraham
    Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.
    Ideology, crisis intensity, organizational demography, and industrial type as determinants of organizational change in kibbutzim2010In: Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, ISSN 0021-8863, E-ISSN 1552-6879, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 388-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kibbutzim were a pure missionary organization known for their egalitarian-communal lifestyle. However, like many other organizational forms, the kibbutz model has been subjected to significant pressures to become more market oriented. This challenges the existence of kibbutzim in many ways. Stressing ideological homogeneity as a key predictor of change, this study also examines the effect of crisis as assessed by financial distress, demographic depletion, and type of manufacturing industry, on change intensity. Using a sample of 171 kibbutzim over a 7 year-period, the findings indicate consistent effects of ideology, crisis intensity, demographic depletion, and organizational size on change intensity. Theoretical implications for atypical organizations are discussed.

  • 46.
    Sheaffer, Zachary
    et al.
    Dept. of Economics and Management, Ariel University Centre, Ariel, Israel.
    Honig, Benson
    Teresa Cascioli Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Zionit, Shaul
    Dept. of Management and Economics, The Open University of Israel, Israel.
    Yeheskel, Orly
    School of Management and Economics, The Academic College of Tel-Aviv Jaffa, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Radical changes, ideology, dwindling membership and financial distress: A macro longitudinal study2011In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 291-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this longitudinal study we examine how core changes, dwindling membership and ideological embeddedness, lead to financial distress in a unique organizational setting: declining Israeli kibbutzim. We analyze six years of core changes and their effects on financial distress for 102 Israeli kibbutzim. The research is based on an organizational macro-temporal dataset where the same 40 changes were measured concurrently and consecutively in 270 kibbutzim. These changes range from incremental or tectonic, to radical, and cover a range of organizational facets. Results indicate that turnaround measures, including radical transformation of governance and remuneration policies, serve only to exacerbate rather than alleviate financial distress. Stronger ideological embeddedness was also found to aggravate financial distress.

  • 47.
    Zeng, Zhaocheng E.
    et al.
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    How should entrepreneurship be taught to students with diverse experience? A set of conceptual models of entrepreneurship education2016In: Models of start-up thinking and action: Theoretical, empirical and pedagogical approaches / [ed] Jerome A. Katz , Andrew C. Corbett, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 237-282Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship education has been largely treated as a pedagogical "black box." Despite the emergence of popular entrepreneurship models such as business planning, the lean startup, or business model canvas, neither theoretical nor pedagogical foundations are typically evident. This limits the accumulation of useful evidence that could inform better teaching practices. In this chapter, we develop a set of conceptual models anchored in learning theory regarding how entrepreneurship education should be taught to students. These conceptual models are built on the techniques of entrepreneurship pedagogy such as experiential education. They are developed for three groups of students: students without any, entrepreneurship experience, students with previous entrepreneurship experience, and students who are currently running their start-ups. A set of potential variables that could be used for course evaluation purposes is also included. The proposed models meet the needs of students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience. Theoretically, we demonstrate that entrepreneurship students should not be treated as a homogeneous group, as they have different levels of startup experience and different educational needs. Lecturers of entrepreneurship programs could choose the suitable model proposed in this chapter in teaching based on the characteristics of their students. The chapter provides novel insights with regard to how entrepreneurship programs should be designed for students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience.

  • 48.
    Zeng, Zhaocheng
    et al.
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Honig, Benson
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    A study of living wage effects on employees' performance-related attitudes and behaviour2017In: Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0825-0383, E-ISSN 1936-4490, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 19-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the surge of interest in living wage research, most studies pay little attention to the effect of living wages on employee attitudes and behaviour. We examine the differences between living wage and minimum wage workers on three attitudinal and behavioural outcomes: affective commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), and turnover intention. We also examine the effects of training and benefits on the three outcomes. Results show that living wage workers have higher affective commitment and lower turnover intention. Training and benefits also improve workers' attitudinal and behavioural outcomes variously.

1 - 48 of 48
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