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  • 1.
    Golding, Michael A.
    et al.
    Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Batac, Ayel L. R.
    Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Ahlstedt, Staffan
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Protudjer, Jennifer L. P.
    Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg,Manitoba, Canada; Department of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    The burden of food allergy on children and teens: A systematic review2022In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 33, no 3, article id e13743Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Over the last two decades, researchers have placed increasing attention on understanding how food allergy affects the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and psychosocial well-being of children and teens. In response, a number of reviews have been published that aim at synthesizing the literature. However, many of these papers focus narrowly on HRQL or suffer from methodological limitations.

    Method

    The current review aims to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive overview of the burden of pediatric food allergy by synthesizing the quantitative and qualitative literature.

    Results

    Findings from the present review provide evidence of reduced HRQL among children and teens with food allergy, particularly older children and those with more severe manifestations of the condition. In comparison to HRQL, the link between food allergy and psychosocial functioning is less clear; however, some evidence can be cited linking food allergy to greater levels of psychological distress. Qualitative evidence suggests that the burden of pediatric food allergy largely stems from worries surrounding exposures outside of the home and the social consequences of the condition. The current review also highlights several gaps in the literature, including a paucity of longitudinal research, research focused on predictors of psychological distress among children and teens with food allergy as well as a dearth of studies comparing rates of bullying in food-allergic and non-food-allergic samples.

    Conclusion

    More emphasis should be placed on not only alleviating the social and psychological consequences of food allergy, but also on identifying and assisting those most acutely burdened by the condition.

  • 2.
    Golding, Michael A.
    et al.
    The Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlstedt, Staffan
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Protudjer, Jennifer L. P.
    The Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    A scoping review of the caregiver burden of pediatric food allergy2021In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 127, no 5, p. 536-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    While a number of papers have described the psychosocial impact of raising a child with a food allergy, recent attempts at synthesizing this literature have been narrow in focus and/or methodologically limited. Consequently, the current study aimed to synthesize both the quantitative and qualitative literature in order to achieve a better understanding of the psychosocial and financial burdens faced by families raising children with food allergy.

    Data Sources

    Searches were performed on PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo and CINAHL for articles related to the psychosocial and financial burden experienced by individuals caring for a child with food allergy.

    Study Selections

    English language, original research articles were included in the current review.

    Results

    A total of 53 articles were deemed eligible for review. Results from the quantitative literature revealed that parents of children with food allergy (i.e., food allergy and food protein-induced enterocolitis, proctocolitis, and enteropathy) consistently reported lower QoL relative to their comparison groups. Within-group analyses suggest that this burden is increased for parents managing multiple food allergies, severe food allergy, and comorbid allergic conditions. Thematic synthesis of the qualitative literature suggests that the psychosocial burden shouldered by parents of children with food allergy stems, in part, from the unpredictable threat of exposure as well as the practical and social burdens of managing a food allergy. In addition to psychosocial burdens, a small but growing body of literature suggests that families with food allergy also incur greater financial costs.

    Conclusion

    Findings suggest that pediatric food allergy imposes considerable burdens on parents both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  • 3.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    “Stop acting like a child – you're immature”: The reversed ageism of practicing self-injury as adult women and the reclaiming of our bodies2023In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 67, article id 101187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of self-injury is considered deviant and pathological, and the stereotype of a self-injuring individual is a young, white, middle-class woman. By using an autoethnographic approach, I elucidate how four women and I, aged 35–51, with experiences of self-injury in adulthood, use, internalize, and speak through dominant discourses of self-injury. The practice of self-injury is an embodied one, and self-injury is stereotypically associated with immature, irresponsible, and emotionally unstable young women. As adult women who self-injure, we use and speak through this representation, which, to some extent, affects our self-image and identity as we are often “misrecognized” as full partners in everyday social interaction or when we represent our professions. Still, we resist the idea of self-injury as stemming from immaturity, and we work to reclaim our bodies and agency from the medicalized, ageist assumptions of the practice of self-injury. By doing this, we can also rewrite and transform the meaning of this practice. Our self-inflicted wounds or scars do not define who we are nor our level of maturity, intelligence, and attractiveness. Thus, we acknowledge that we have the right to our own bodies and what we do to that body.

  • 4.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    The activation and restoration of shame in an intimate relationship: A first-hand account of self-injury2021In: Qualitative Sociology Review, ISSN 1733-8077, E-ISSN 1733-8077, Vol. XVII, no 2, p. 104-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is grounded in a first-hand account of my own experiences with self-injury and shame. By using my personal diary entries as support for this account and a sociological framework of shame, I explore the process of shame and shame reactions in an intimate relationship. I illustrate how shame was activated by my internalized critical other, how the shame cycle de-stabilized my relationship, and, finally, how shame was restored through the other’s validation and acceptance, or how it led to more shame managed by self-injury. However, this account is not simply about self-analysis, or a need to indulge in my pain; rather, it is an inner dialogue that rests on the commitment to develop a richer understanding of the personal and interpersonal experiences of self-injury and shame. Today, I finally understand how shame works and this has helped me to not get caught up in my emotions. So, although shame may take a hold of me at times, I am no longer, like before, controlled by my shame. 

  • 5.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    The scarred body: A personal reflection of self-injury scars2022In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-injury is deemed a pathology and a deviant practice that is not socially sanctioned and culturally accepted as soothing and healing the self. The marked female body is also pathologized and perceived as deviant; hence, having self-inflicted scars may easily lead to social stigma, shame, and the need to hide the scars. In this personal reflection I explore how self-inflicted scars can have the same meaning as self-injury to control the self and act as self-expression, and how the marked female body can be a resistance to the cultural idea of femininity. I draw upon my own personal experiences of self-inflicted scars and how these scars have become intertwined with my identity. I have carved or burnt my body in different situations and from different moods in the past, but they are all with me at the present and will be with me in the future. Without the scars, I am not the person that others see me as or I see myself as. I sometimes feel that I would be nothing without my scars. 

  • 6.
    Gunnarsson, Nina V.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Lönnberg, Mikaela
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    The “good” and the “bad” subject position in self-injury autobiographies2022In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 974-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing published autobiographies, we explore how individuals who self-injure discursively construct their experiences of the self and self-injury. The authors construct their selves into two seemingly opposite subject positions, here named the "bad girl" and the "good girl." For the most part, the authors identify themselves with the "bad girl" position. Although there is a struggle to uphold normalcy in front of others, they regard evidence of the "good girl" position as fake. We demonstrate how they, to a large extent, accept the dominant discourse of self-injury as an individual and pathological problem for which they tend to blame themselves. However, they also challenge the negative subject position by separating themselves discursively from the bad "side of the self." Acts of self-injury are described as a way to cope with the negative perception of themselves and at the same time being what causes feelings of self-loathing. Thus, understanding how the psychomedical discourse affects individuals who self-injure as well as the consequences of the medicalization of self-injury are of importance. Furthermore, social workers may be in a legitime position to work with the self-representations and the social factors that may underlie an individual's need to cut or in other ways physically hurt oneself.

  • 7.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Allergins tillblivelse: Föräldrars berättelser om hur barnetskroppsliga besvär identifieras som allergi2007In: Att leva med allergi: Samhällsvetenskapliga och humanistiska perspektiv / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Karolinska institutet.
    Discovery and Management of Child Allergy from the Parent Perspective2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Karolinska Institutet Inst för lärande, informatik, management och etik.
    Parenting Children with Allergy2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
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  • 10.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    The Self-perpetuating Cycle of Shame and Self-injury2021In: Humanity and Society, ISSN 0160-5976, E-ISSN 2372-9708, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous studies have considered shame to be a significant emotion in making sense of self-injury, the connection is still not fully understood. Drawing on sociological ideas on shame, this communication contributes to a theoretical understanding of actions of self-injury by demonstrating how shame operates and unfolds in social interaction. It argues for how shame and self-injury may reproduce and amplify each other, hence turning into a self-perpetuating cycle of shame and self-injury. It shows how shame is triggered in social interaction, how shame leads to self-injury, and how self-injury may turn into more shame. Self-injury is used to fend off shame by upholding social and cultural commitments and maintaining social bonds with others. However, self-injury may also threaten social order and social bonds and, consequently, trigger more shame. The most important reason that self-injury does not fully work as emotion work, and internalized social control, lies in the interactive cycle of shame, that is, you feel shame and cut, you cut again and are (a)shamed, you are shamed and cut, and so on. It is proposed that people who self-injure do not necessarily lack the ability to self-soothe or regulate emotions or that they suffer from a clinical psychopathology.

  • 11.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköpings universitet.
    Mothers' accounts of healthcare encounters: Negotiating culpability and fulfilling the active mother role2013In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 446-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores mothers’ accounts of initial interactions and encounters with healthcare professionals and the outcomes where questions about their children’s problems are concerned. A case-based storyline was reconstructed as part of the analysis, focusing on when and how mothers claimed to be responsible parents. The outcomes of these encounters were presented by the mothers in this study as a drawn-out process, with disagreement between mothers and healthcare providers, resulting in different performances of moral agency. Some mothers portrayed themselves as dependent on healthcare expertise and made moral claims by attributing and deflecting blame, negotiating back and forth about their own and the healthcare professionals’ culpability, restoring moral agency. Other mothers did not generally defend or justify their actions or place blame, but appealed instead to fulfilment of the active mother role where they controlled the interaction and claimed full responsibility for their child’s care, hence presenting their moral agency as indisputable.                 

  • 12.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Managing Family Relations and Controlling Information While Supporting an Allergic Child2013In: Qualitative Sociology Review, ISSN 1733-8077, E-ISSN 1733-8077, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 204-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores parental (particularly mothers’) support in the daily lives of children with allergies in a Swedish context. An ordinary life is established by making comparisons to what other children without allergies presumably can do (and eat). Although the parents’ goal is to support their child in managing allergies, neither their practical nor their interactional strategies work in a clear-cut direction to promote the child’s ordinary life and identity. On the contrary, parents’ accounts convey that they function just as much against an everyday life and the child’s identity. When managing family relations, parents expect immediate family members (specifically grandparents) to understand and accommodate the child’s needs. However, claims of family responsibility are made through moral tales about lack of support from “generalized others.” Family responsibility is also downplayed in parents’ accounts as demands of support may put parents’ moral self at risk. The strategy of information control in certain situations and (non-family) relations used to keep the child safe may risk stigmatizing the child, alternatively, making the child into a social threat. One of the conclusions that could be drawn from this study is that claims of family support may be contradictory to other cultural principles that ascribe responsibilities between families and individuals, as the principles of individual freedom and autonomy.

  • 13.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University.
    Organizing allergy and being a “good” parent: Parents’ narratives about their children’s emerging problems2009In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on the early and problem-solving phases of the child's illness trajectory and on how child allergies are constructed and organized by the parents in a moral everyday context. The parents' narratives were reconstructed as narratives, describing the pathways parents take before they decide to seek professional medical aid as well as showing how they construct themselves as responsible parents. Before consulting health professionals the parents have often tried a range of different ways to define, control and manage their children's various problems. Allergy problems were interpreted and responded to differently, depending on the way they emerged in everyday life. Acute reactions quickly led to an illness definition and a diagnosis. Gradual and diffuse problems were not so easily defined. They were at first interpreted and responded to as normal infant problems, but, through the parents' readiness and various situational and temporal clues, they were organized as symptoms of illness. Parents seek medical aid when their own strategies fail or do not fully work, but their decisions are also formed within a pre-problem context of their moral accountability as parents.

  • 14.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Marklund, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ahlstedt, Staffan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Allergy-like conditions and health-care contacts among children with exclusion diets at school.2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To find out whether children with exclusion diet at school had allergy-like conditions that could explain their food avoidance, the objective of this study was to describe health-care contacts and diagnostic testing among schoolchildren with exclusion diet and compare the magnitude of allergy-like conditions between those children who had vs. had not consulted health-care professionals. Telephone interviews were conducted with the parents of 230 schoolchildren, aged 6–18 years, with certificates for exclusion diets at school.

    Results:  The majority of the schoolchildren (85%) had consulted health-care professionals for food-related problems, and 68% were doctor-diagnosed as having food hypersensitivity. Those who had consulted health-care professionals specifically for their food-related problems had more complex and severe problems compared with those who had not consulted health-care professionals. Breathing difficulties (27/196) and anaphylaxis (9/196) related to intake of food were reported only for those who had sought health-care professionals (n = 196). Regardless of whether the children had consulted the health-care professionals, their food-related problems were consistent with food hypersensitivity. Schoolchildren avoided food items known to be associated with food hypersensitivity such as tree nuts, fruit, egg, peanut, lactose and fish. Furthermore, 83% of the 230 children also had allergic diseases (i.e. asthma, eczema or hay fever) or were hypersensitive to other substances besides food, and 83% had at least one sibling or parent with hypersensitivity to foods or other substances.

    Conclusions and implications for the school nurse:  Schoolchildren with food certificates for exclusion diets, based on parents’ statements, have food-related and allergy-like problems that may well motivate exclusion diets at school. The school nurses can rely on the parents’ information as to what foods their children should avoid, even when doctor diagnoses have not been made or health-care consultations have not been carried out.

  • 15.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Gunnarsson, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Center for Collaborative Palliative care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and to explore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health and social work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between 2003–2013.

    Design

    An integrative literature review.

    Methods

    PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Index and AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles including the concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articles are in accordance to Meleis' typologies of transition by experts in each discipline. Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

    Results

    Meleis' four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except development in oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored, whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

  • 16.
    Middelveld, R.
    et al.
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlstedt, S.
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Protudjer, J. L. P.
    Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between food allergy and perceived life status2020In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 125, no 6, p. P703-P705.E1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Middelveld, R.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Ahlstedt, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Protudjer, J. L. P.
    Univ Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Establishing perceived life status of children with food allergy, and their families by use of a visual analogue scale2020In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 75, no Supplement 109, p. 511-511Article in journal (Refereed)
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