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  • 1.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Assessment philosophies and practices in Sweden2000In: Interdisciplinary clinical assessment of young children with developmental disabilities, Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes , 2000, p. 391-412Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Special education: a systems theory perspective2005In: Mångsidigt samspel: en vänbok till Siv Fischbein, Stockholm: Hls Förlag , 2005, p. 41-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Early Childhood Intervention2006In: Encyclopedia of Disability, London: Sage Publications , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The International Consortium for Early Childhood Intervention2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Varför behövs en barnversion av ICF?2003In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 6, p. 510-514Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Pan, Yi-Ling
    et al.
    Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Hwang, Ai-Wen
    Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School Psychology and Applied Developmental Science and Special Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
    Lu, Lu
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Liao, Hua-Fang
    Taiwan Society of ICF, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Utility of the early delay and disabilities code set for exploring the linkage between ICF-CY and assessment reports for children with developmental delay2019In: Infants and young children, ISSN 0896-3746, E-ISSN 1550-5081, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 215-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) offers a universal language of codes to document childhood functioning. The ICF-CY Code Set for Infants with Early Delay and Disabilities (EDD Code Set) has been developed to facilitate the practical application of the ICF for children. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the EDD Code Set by exploring the linkage between ICF and children's assessment reports. We reviewed 30 Comprehensive Assessment Reports (CAR) for children with developmental delay (DD), aged 9-34 months in a joint evaluation center. Meaningful concepts in compulsory and supplementary sections of the CAR were identified and linked to the EDD Code Set. Linkage was measured by (a) number of linked codes and (b) average of code-only and code-with-qualifier percentages. Content in the CAR was linked to 72 of the 82 EDD codes with more codes linked from the supplementary (71) than the compulsory section (58). The largest proportion of linked codes was activities and participation (85%). The EDD Code Set can be used to examine the ICF linkage of pediatric assessment reports and guide future development or revision of pediatric documentation and participation-based intervention. 

  • 7.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Leonardi, Mathilde
    Italian National Neurological Institute ‘‘Carlo Besta’’, Milan, Italy, and the World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lollar, Don
    National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Hollenweger, Judith
    Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Department of Research and Development, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Martinuzzi, Andrea
    Medea, Conegliano Research Centre, Conegliano, Italy.
    Applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to measure childhood disability2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 602-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-ICF addresses the broad need for a common language and classification of functioning and disability. A parallel need is appropriate measures compatible with the content of the ICF to document the nature and impact of limitations of function, activities and participation. The interaction of developmental characteristics and disability among children represent special challenges for classification as well as measurement. Demographic trends emphasize the need for universal measures that encompass the components of the ICF and can be used in surveillance, screening and evaluation. This paper identifies issues related to application of the ICF to measure disability in childhood; reviews approaches and tools to assess childhood disability and identifies priorities for the development of measures of functioning and disability in children based on the ICF. The development of measures should be framed within a framework of children's rights and application of the biopsychosocial model to document profiles of functioning and disability of children.

  • 8.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Classifying mental retardation: impairment, disability, handicap, limitations or restrictions?2002In: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolving disability, Washington DC.: American Association on Mental retardation , 2002, p. 309-329Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Concept and Classification of Mental Retardation2006In: What is mental retardation?: Ideas for an evolviong Disability in the 21st Century, Washington D.C.: American Association on Mental Retardation , 2006, p. 245-264Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lollar, Don
    Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Brown, Scott C.
    Westat, Washington, DC, USA.
    Zhuoying, Qiu
    Rehabilitation Institute, Beijing, China.
    Gray, David
    Occupational Therapy & Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
    Pan, Yi
    FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    ICF and ICF-CY lessons learned: Pandora’s box of personal factors2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 25, p. 2187-2194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to examine the component of “personal factors” described as a contextual factor in the ICF and ICF-CY.

    Methods: A critical examination of the construct of “personal factors” and description of the component was made with reference to conceptual and taxonomic criteria.

    Results: The “personal factors” component in the ICF/ICF-CY is not defined, there is no taxonomy of codes, there is no explicit purpose stated for its use and no guidelines are provided for its application. In spite of these constraints, the component of “personal factors” is being applied as part of the classifications. Such uncontrolled applications constitute significant risks for the status of ICF/ICF-CY as the WHO reference classification in that: (a) the component is accepted for use by default simply by being applied; (b) component content is expanded with idiosyncratic exemplars by users; and (c) there is potential misuse of “personal factors” in documenting personal attributes, including “blaming the victim”.

    Conclusion: In the absence of formal codes, any application of the component of “personal factors” lacks the legitimacy that documentation with a scientific taxonomy should provide. Given the growing use of the ICF/ICF-CY globally, a priority for the revision process should be to determine if there is in fact need for “personal” or any other factors in the ICF/ICF-CY.

  • 11.
    Vale, Maria do Carmo
    et al.
    Pediatric Neurodevelopment Unit, Hospital Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pereira-da-Silva, Luıs
    Woman, Children and Adolescent’s Medicine Teaching and Research Area, NOVA Medical School of Lisbon, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pimentel, Maria João
    Pediatric Neurodevelopment Unit, Hospital Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Marques, Teresa Nunes
    Early Intervention Program Regional Lisbon Area, Ministry of Social Security and Solidarity, Portugal.
    Rodrigues, Helena
    Department of Special Education, Ministry of Education and Science, Portugal.
    Cunha, Gilda
    Department of Exact Science, Lisbon School of Health Technology, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Machado, Maria do Céu
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Sanches-Ferreira, Manuela
    Special Education Department, School of Education, Porto Polytechnic, Porto, Portugal.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Classifying Functioning of Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: The Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2017In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observational cross-sectional study carried out in a pediatric neurodevelopment unit of a tertiary-care hospital. A sample of 355 children with median ((min.–max.) 1.0–17.3) years with intellectual disability (30.4% borderline, 43.1% mild, 19.7% moderate, 5.1% severe, and 1.7% profound disability) was seen over a period of 3 years. Based on clinical observation and psychological evaluation, a neurodevelopmental pediatrician selected ICF-CY body functions codes, and respective qualifiers, to effectively describe functioning of children. Based on evaluation reports, a psychologist and a special educator assigned the previously chosen ICF-CY body functions codes to 139 and 67 children, respectively. Inter-rater agreement was estimated using simple and weighted Cohen's kappa coefficients and Gwet's AC1 statistic and Gwet's weighted kappa coefficient statistic. A set of eight ICF-CY codes was identified as efficiently describing impairments of body functions of children with intellectual disability: global mental functions b117 and b122; specific mental functions b147, b163, b164, and b167; and voice and speech functions b320 and b330. Results indicate a correspondence between the level of severity of qualifiers assigned to ICF-CY codes and the level of intellectual disability. Inter-rater agreement was variable among raters, with the best agreements found for qualifying intellectual functions (b117) and psychomotor functions (b122). A profile of eight ICF-CY codes effectively describes functioning of children with intellectual disability, providing an alternative to medically based classification, based on diagnoses with functionally based classification of children's characteristics. The findings contribute to define a comprehensive set of codes to reliably record individual differences of functioning in this population.

1 - 11 of 11
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  • fi-FI
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