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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, CIRCLE, Lund, Sweden.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    External Trade and Internal Geography: Local Export Spillovers by Industry Characteristics and Firm Size2012In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, E-ISSN 1742-1780, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 421-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exporting firms in a region may reduce export entry costs for other local firms either through market or non-market interactions. This paper tests this proposition by analyzing whether the probability of exporting among Swedish firms is positively associated with the local presence of exporters in their region and industry. Our results support this conjecture, while also providing some support for such export spillovers being more important in contract-intensive industries and small firms. The results for different industries and size-classes of firms are also sensitive to whether we focus on firms' export status or restrict the sample to export starters.

  • 2.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    et al.
    Linneuniversitet Ekonomihögskolan, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mavondo, Felix T.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The influence of corporate brand perceptions on consumer satisfaction and loyalty via controlled and uncontrolled communications: a multiple mediation analysis2019In: Journal of Consumer Marketing, ISSN 0736-3761, E-ISSN 2052-1200, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Drawing on the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) model, the purpose of this study is to investigate mediating effects of controlled and uncontrolled communications of corporate brand perceptions on consumer satisfaction and loyalty.

    Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypotheses on a sample of 271 Australian automobile consumers.

    Findings: The authors find that while consumer satisfaction is indirectly influenced by corporate-level attributes via controlled and uncontrolled communication, the authors did not find an indirect effect between consumer benefits on consumer satisfaction via controlled and uncontrolled communication. By contrast, the authors find highly significant indirect effects – via controlled and uncontrolled communication as well as consumer satisfaction – for the relationship between, on the one hand, corporate-level attributes and consumer benefits and consumer brand loyalty on the other. Uncontrolled communication was significantly associated with consumer loyalty, a relevant finding that indicates an importance of tracking media coverage and maintaining favorable relationships with the media.

    Research limitations/implications: The cross-sectional method limits data collection to one point in time.

    Practical implications: This study adds to a better understanding of how to leverage corporate brand through communications in ways that it positively resonates with consumers. A fine-grained analysis of corporate brand attributes and consumer-perceived benefits can aid managers in developing specific and more effective marketing strategies.

    Originality/value: The overall thrust of this empirical study, which is to investigate how corporate brand perceptions influence short term (satisfaction) and long term (loyalty) via controlled and uncontrolled communications is original. This study comprehensively conceptualizes and operationalizes the corporate brand as a multidimensional construct consisting of corporate-level attributes and brand-level attributes such as perceived consumer benefits. To examine the hypothesized relationships between and among our constructs, the authors go beyond the commonly studied single mediator model and test a multiple mediator model instead.

  • 3.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Mavondo, Felix T.
    Monash University, Department of Marketing, Melbourne, Australia.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Controlled and uncontrolled communication stimuli and organic food purchases: The mediating role of perceived communication clarity, perceived health benefits, and trust2019In: Journal of Marketing Communications, ISSN 1352-7266, E-ISSN 1466-4445, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 180-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing demand worldwide, organic food remains a niche category, with consumers only purchasing it some of the time. This study examines the mediating effects of consumers’ perceived clarity of organic food-related communication, trust for, and perceived health benefits of organic foods in the relationship between controlled and uncontrolled communication stimuli and organic food purchases. We test our hypotheses on a sample of 1011 Australian organic food consumers using Structural Equation Modeling. We find that all mediators except perceived communication clarity perform as hypothesized, with the latter not mediating the relationship between uncontrolled communications and perceived health benefits of organic foods. The results suggest that marketers should ensure clarity in controlled organic food communications, signal health benefits of organic food and build consumer trust to generate organic purchases. 

  • 4.
    Ghosal, Vivek
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Weiss, Jan F.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Decentralized environmental regulations and plant-level productivity2019In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 998-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the framework provided by the Porter hypothesis, we study the impact of environmental regulations and enforcement policies on plant-level green total factor productivity (TFP) growth and its components related to efficiency change and technical change. The detailed microdata we use are from Sweden and for the pulp and paper industry. This industry is the source of significant amounts of water and air pollution and is one of the most heavily environmentally regulated manufacturing industries. Sweden has a unique decentralized regulatory structure where the manufacturing plants have to comply with plant-specific regulatory standards stipulated at the national level, as well as decentralized local supervision and enforcement. Our empirical results point to beneficial impacts of the environmental policies on plants' green TFP growth and sustainable production practices. We also find that political economy considerations are important, as the presence of the Green Party and aspects like plant size (with corresponding local and regional economic effects) matter in enforcement of the standards.

  • 5.
    Lejpras, Anna
    et al.
    DIW Berlin, department Innovation, Manufacturing, Service.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Bartkowiak, Igor
    Europa-Universität Viadrina, Frankfurt/Oder.
    Kampe, Carsten
    LASA Brandenburg GmbH.
    Höhne, Markus
    LASA Brandenburg GmbH.
    Weiss, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Innovationspotenzialanalyse: Stadt Luckenwalde2010Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Stephan, Andreas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Weiss, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Regionale Innovationspolitik: Konzentration auf Hightech kann in die Irre führen2010In: Wochenbericht des DIW Berlin, ISSN 0012-1304, Vol. 77, no 29, p. 8-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Weiss, Jan F.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Essays on externalities, regulation, institutions, and firm performance2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is devoted to the empirical analysis of how externalities—the nonexistence of private markets in some good or the absence of sufficient incentives to establish such markets— affect firm performance and growth. A minor part investigates a direct link between positive externalities, in the form of localized knowledge spillovers, and firm growth, by testing the so-called local export spillover hypothesis: Exporting firms in a region may reduce export entry costs for other local firms through export-related informal knowledge and information flows. The results support the notion of the role of such local externalities as external input into firms’ export-specific knowledge function, while also providing some support for such export spillovers being more important in contract-intensive industries and small firms.

    The bulk of my articles examines indirect performance effects of negative pollution externalities. This type of externality calls for formal, as well as informal, institutions that take corrective measures to make polluting agents pay the social and environmental cost of their emissions, thereby restoring the social efficiency losses caused by those externalities. The operational tool to achieve an internalization of the social and environmental costs brought about by pollution externalities is environmental policy, with laws and regulations constituting common policy manifestations. In other words, protecting human health and the environment is the primary purpose of environmental policies. Increasingly, the economic growth paradigm of modern market economies has added a second argument to polluting societies’ welfare function: economic growth.

    Harmonizing these two arguments—social and environmental well-being and economic welfare—has traditionally been considered difficult, with conventional wisdom arguing that environmental regulation of polluting agents is costly and ultimately detrimental to growth. Harvard professor Michael Porter, in his widely debated Porter Hypothesis, has challenged this entrenched view, arguing that environmental policy, if ‘well-designed,’ can attain a ‘double dividend’ or ‘win-win’situation of simultaneous environmental and economic benefits. The present thesis aims to find empirical evidence of Porter’s reasoning. Using microdata on the Swedish pulp, paper and chemical industries, it attempts to empirically analyze whether there are adequate institutional configurations in the form of properly crafted environmental policies that allow for an internalization of pollution externalities such that a ‘win-win’ situation characterized by the simultaneous accomplishment of environmental benefits for society and economic benefits for the polluting agents can be created. The empirical results suggest that environmental regulation, if properly designed, indeed can induce mutual environmental and economic benefits, which provides valuable implications for modern environmental policy.

  • 8.
    Weiss, Jan F.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Shirokova, Galina
    St. Petersburg University, Russia.
    The translation of entrepreneurial intention into start-up behaviour: The moderating role of regional social capital2019In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 473-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the moderating role of regional social capital in the intention–behaviour link in entrepreneurship. We investigate to what extent the regional social capital context in which aspiring entrepreneurs are embedded strengthens or weakens the translation of individual entrepreneurial intentions into new venture creation activities. Our results suggest that the intention–behaviour link is weakened by cognitive regional social capital in the form of regional hierarchy values and strengthened by structural regional capital in the form of regional cultural diversity and regional breadth of associational activity, as well as by relational regional social capital in the form of high levels of regional generalised trust. Our findings suggest that to support new venture creation activity, there is a need to grow regional social capital via the enhancement of social trust, associational activities and regional cultural diversity – and at the same time decrease hierarchical social structures within regions.

  • 9.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    The innovation and performance effects of well-designed environmental regulation: evidence from Sweden2019In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 534-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis (PH) and its dynamic nature. The PH posits that well-designed environmental regulations induce eco-innovations at polluting firms that improve both their environmental and business performance via ‘innovation offsets.’ We conduct an econometric test of this proposition, using Swedish pulp and paper plants as empirical application. Swedish environmental regulation of polluting industries provides an interesting case because it has been praised, due to containing elements of ‘well-designed’ regulations, for being conducive to accomplishing the ‘win-win’ situation of mutual environmental and economic benefits. The empirical results indicate that flexible and dynamic command-and-control regulation and economic incentive instruments have induced innovation offsets through improved energy efficiency. Our study bears important implications: empirical tests of the PH that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure ‘well-designed’ regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

  • 10.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Well-designed environmental regulation and firm performance: Swedish evidence on the Porter hypothesis and the effect of regulatory time strategies2019In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 342-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using recent data on a cross-section of Swedish chemical and pulp and paper firms, this paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis. Well-designed environmental regulation can stimulate firms’ innovative capabilities, while at the same time generating innovation offsets that may both offset net compliance costs and yield a competitive edge over those firms that are not affected by such regulations. In doing so, we also test the alleged effectiveness of regulatory time strategies in stimulating innovation activities of regulated firms. We find evidence for the effectiveness of such well-designed regulations: announced rather than existing regulation induces innovation and some innovation offsets. Our results imply that empirical tests of the Porter hypothesis that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure well-designed regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

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