Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Hagen, Johannes
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    In the Eye of the Storm: Entrepreneurs and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Crisis2023In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 751-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the well-being of entrepreneurs. We surveyed a representative sample of Swedish entrepreneurs and wage employees at different stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey data, combined with register data, show that the COVID-19 outbreak has a negative effect on the well-being of entrepreneurs in terms of increased perceived stress. However, this negative effect is weaker for entrepreneurs who feel younger than their chronological age and entrepreneurs who are geographically distant from the epicenter of the crisis. 

  • 2.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, CharlieJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.Kekezi, OrsaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many developed countries are facing a demographic change with an increasing share of older individuals, yet little is known about how older workers will impact regional and national economies in terms of labor market dynamics. This Handbook deals with the important and emerging field of entrepreneurship among this group and focuses on the behavioral perspectives of this phenomenon; on innovation, dynamics and performance; and the ways entrepreneurship among the elderly looks within different countries.

    [From publisher's description]

  • 3.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Introduction to the Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging2019In: Handbook of research on entrepreneurship and aging / [ed] M. Backman, C. Karlsson & O. Kekezi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, , p. 448p. 1-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Full-text
  • 4.
    Credit, Kevin
    et al.
    Maynooth Univ, Natl Ctr Geocomputat, Maynooth, Ireland..
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Stockholm Univ, SOFI, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Florida, Richard
    Univ Toronto, Rotman Sch Management, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Sch Cities, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Third places, the connective fibre of cities and high-tech entrepreneurship2024In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban 'third places' foster informal interactions and face-to-face contact that is critical to the development of new innovations and start-up businesses. Our research utilises extensive microdata in combination with telephone interviews with over 200 start-up companies in Stockholm, Sweden. Our findings indicate that access to third places has a significant impact on the number of new high-tech start-ups (both by entrepreneur place of residence and work) in their vicinity. This suggests that third places play a demonstrable role in innovation and economic growth.

  • 5.
    Henning, Martin
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Econ Business & Law, POB 610, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Social Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Upward job mobility in local economies2023In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 431-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies upward job mobility in different types of local economies. Relying on Swedish register data, we disentangle the impacts stemming from local labour market size, the presence of related industries and occupations and the size of own-industry and own-occupation concentrations. Results show that the local economic structure is important in shaping upward mobility outcomes. However, we observe different impacts from local industry-versus-occupation agglomerations and depending on whether people move from lower-paid or higher-paid jobs. The results have important implications for understanding the drivers of upward job mobility in times of increasing labour market polarization and regional divergence.

  • 6.
    Holgersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics. Centre for Data Intensive Sciences and Applications, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Towards a multivariate innovation index2018In: Economics of Innovation and New Technology, ISSN 1043-8599, E-ISSN 1476-8364, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 254-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that traditional measures of innovation as a univariate phenomenon may not be dynamic enough to adequately describe the complex nature of innovation. Consequently, the purpose is to develop a multidimensional index of innovation that is able to reflect innovation enablers and outputs. The index may then be used (i) to assess and quantify temporal changes of innovation, (ii) to describe regional differences and similarities of innovation, and (iii) serve as exogenous variables to analyze the importance of innovation for other economic phenomena. Our index is defined in a four-dimensional space of orthogonal axes. An empirical case study is used for demonstration of the index, where 44 variables are collected for all municipalities in Sweden. The index spanning the four-dimensional innovation comprises size, accessibility, firm performance, and agglomeration. The proposed index offers a new way of defining and analyzing innovation and should have a wide range of important applications in a world where innovation is receiving a great deal of recognition.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). SOFI, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diversity of experience and labor productivity in creative industries2021In: Journal for Labour Market Research, ISSN 2510-5027, Vol. 55, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how the previous experience among workers relates to the labor productivity of the creative industries in Sweden. Effective knowledge transfers are dependent on the cognitive distance among employees. Using longitudinal matched employer-employee data, I measure the portfolio of the skills within a workplace through (i) the workers' previous occupation, and (ii) the industry they have been working in previously. Estimates show that diversity of occupational experience is positive for labor productivity, but the diversity of industry experience is not. When distinguishing between related and unrelated diversity, the relatedness of occupational experience is positive for labor productivity, while unrelated occupational experience instead shows negative relationship with productivity. These results point towards the importance of occupational skills that workers bring with them to a new employment, for labor productivity.

  • 8.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Geography and consumption of local media2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Labor market pooling and job outcomes of displaced workersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Labor mobility across jobs and space2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of one introductory chapter and four independent papers. Each paper looks at different aspects of labor mobility, especially focusing on the transferability of specific human capital and the role of space for job matching.

    The focus of the first paper is to examine how diversity of previous work experience of employees in creative industries matters for labor productivity. I further distinguish between related vs. unrelated occupation and industry experience to better understand how they matter for knowledge flows within a firm. The results show that diversity, and especially relatedness of previous occupational experience, are positively related to labor productivity.

    In the second paper, I study how co-location of knowledge-intensive business services influences the innovative capacity of the sector. The results suggest that co-location facilitates labor mobility and thereby knowledge flows as well as innovation capacity across firms.

    In the third and fourth papers, the focus shifts from the firm to the individual. The third paper examines how regional characteristics, especially Marshallian labor market pooling, influence the type of employment obtained after job displacement. The results show that regional industrial and occupational structures are crucial for facilitating job matches and occupational upgrades of individuals. The fourth paper examines whether there are wage returns to migration after job displacement, after the job match is considered. The results indicate that returns to migration are positive only when combined with a re-employment that matches the skills of the worker.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    presentationsbild
  • 11.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Previous experience and labor productivity in creative industriesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Boschma, Ron
    Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Returns to migration after job loss – The importance of job match2021In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1565-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loss of specific human capital is often identified as a mechanism through which displaced workers might experience permanent drops in earnings after job loss. Research has shown that displaced workers who migrate out of their region of origin have lower earnings than those who do not. This paper extends the discussion on returns to migration by accounting for the type of jobs people get and how related they are to their skills. Using an endogenous treatment model to control for selection bias in migration and career change, we compare displaced stayers with displaced movers in Sweden. Results show that migrants who get a job that matches their occupation- and industry-specific skills display the highest earnings among all displaced workers. If migration is combined with a job mismatch, earning losses are instead observed. This group experiences the lowest earnings among all displaced workers.

  • 13.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dall'erba, Sandy
    Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics and Center for Climate, Regional, Environmental and Trade Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
    Kang, Dongwoo
    Korea Labor Institute, Sejong National Research Complex, Sejong-si, Korea.
    The role of interregional and inter-sectoral knowledge spillovers on regional knowledge creation across US metropolitan counties2022In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, E-ISSN 1742-1780, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 291-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper relies on a regional knowledge production function to examine the heterogeneous determinants of knowledge creation across five US manufacturing sectors and 853 metropolitan counties over the period 2001-08. Using a Tobit model with state fixed effects, the results indicate that local intra- and inter-sectoral research and development (R&D) investments by the private sector as well as university R&D play a key role in knowledge creation across all sectors under study. We also find that the role of short- versus long-distance interregional spillovers on knowledge creation varies greatly across sectors. These key features improve the design of future local and national innovation policies.

  • 14.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Agglomeration and innovation of knowledge intensive business services2020In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, no 5, p. 538-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some time now, the research focusing on Knowledge Intensive Business Services (KIBS) has been very active. Observing that knowledge as a production factor is only becoming more and more pronounced, this focus is well-grounded. It is therefore important to examine how these knowledge-hubs gain and propagate their knowledge. We hypothesize that KIBS (as many other sectors) benefit from intra-industry knowledge spillovers facilitated by geographical concentration. Our focus is the innovative capacity of KIBS, which we measure through trademarks registered by KIBS firms. While there may be several mechanisms facilitating knowledge spillovers, we can identify local intra-sectoral labor mobility as one. Accessibility measures are used to assess the geographical attenuation of the spillover effects. Results show that the distance decay of spillovers is fast. Only local concentrations of KIBS seem to be of importance. Over longer distances, we instead observe negative consequences for trademarking, indicating possible spatial competition effects.

  • 15.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Agglomeration of economic activity and the performance of knowledge intensive business services2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Agglomeration of economic activity and the performance of knowledge intensive business services2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Social Res SOFI, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Geography and consumption of local media2018In: Journal of Media Economics, ISSN 0899-7764, E-ISSN 1532-7736, Vol. 31, no 3-4, p. 96-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization has led to the centralization of many important functions, including the media sector. In the case of Sweden, 53% of journalists now live in the capital region of Stockholm. The number of local editorial offices has shrunk from 668 to 273 in 28 years. What impact does this media centralization have? A recent report from the U.S. by the PEW Institute shows that rural communities experience a sense of being disconnected from what is being reported by the media. In this paper, we hypothesize that the lack of a local editorial office can lead to a lower consumption of local news (either in print form or online). Similarly, we also test if local news consumption decreases due to having fewer local journalists. Based on fine level data for Sweden in 2006 and in 2013, the results of our analysis suggest that the existence of an editorial office in a municipality is not significantly related to the consumption of local newspapers, but that accessibility to employed journalists who live in the municipality is.

  • 18.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Geography and Media: Does a Local Editorial Office Increase the Consumption of Local News?2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization and new digital technologies have significantly altered the news media industry. One major change is the disappearance of local editorial offices in many regions. This paper examines if there is a relation between access to local media in terms of editorial offices and journalists, and the likelihood of the public consuming local news. The study builds on fine level data for Sweden in 2006 and in 2013, allowing for a comparison of trends. Our results suggest that the existence of an editorial office in the municipality is not significantly related to the consumption of local newspapers but that accessibility to employed journalists who live in the municipality is.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Upplevda effekter av investeringsstöd2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utvärderingen undersöker stödmottagarnas egna uppfattningar om hur investeringsstöden påverkar företagens företagsutveckling, innovationsförmåga och konkurrenskraft. I den här rapporten söker man således fånga de effekter av investeringsstöd som inte kan följas genom indikatorer och ansökningsinformation.

  • 20.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Sjölander, Pär
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Månsson, Kristofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The efficiency of the Scandinavian banking sector – a wavelet quantile regression analysis2015In: Applied Economics, ISSN 0003-6846, E-ISSN 1466-4283, Vol. 47, no 50, p. 5378-5389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the Scandinavian housing financing market is analysed in order to determine whether the interest rate price-discovery processes of Denmark, Norway and Sweden are efficient. Based on wavelet quantile regression analysis, we find systematic positive asymmetric price transmission (APT) inefficiencies. We conclude that there is a very high propensity for mortgage lenders to directly increase its customers’ mortgage interest rates subsequently to an increase in its borrowing costs. However, after a corresponding borrowing cost decrease, the same mortgage lenders are very slow to decrease its customers’ mortgage rates. These positive coefficients for so-called APT effects are found in all Scandinavian countries, even if the coefficients for Norway were not statistically significant. Wavelet quantile regression analysis, with a focus on the relevant higher percentiles, is easily motivated since the mortgage rates are adjusted very infrequently. Moreover, wavelet decomposition allows a robust analysis at different time frequency scales, while simultaneously controlling for nonstationary trends, autocorrelation and structural breaks. Except for the still positive but yet insignificant and inconclusive coefficients for Norway, the result is very clear-cut. Regardless of which wavelet scaling decomposition or quantile coefficient that is studied – positive APT effects are clearly identified and confirmed on the Scandinavian mortgage market.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf