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  • 1.
    Davoodi, Anahita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    A Conceptual Framework for Integration of Evidence-Based Design with Lighting Simulation Tools2017In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 82Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of lighting simulation tools has been growing over the past years which has improved lighting analysis. While computer simulations have proven to be a viable tool for analyzing lighting in physical environments, they have difficulty in assessing the effects of light on occupant’s perception. Evidence-based design (EBD) is a design method that is gaining traction in building design due to its strength in providing means to assess the effects of built environments on humans. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for integrating EBD with lighting simulation tools. Based on a literature review, it was investigated how EBD and lighting simulation can be combined to provide a holistic lighting performance evaluation method. The results show that they can mutually benefit from each other. EBD makes it possible to evaluate and/or improve performance metrics by utilizing user feedback. On the other hand, performance metrics can be used for a better description of evidence, and to analyze the effects of lighting with more details. The results also show that EBD can be used to evaluate light simulations to better understand when and how they should be performed. A framework is presented for integration of lighting simulation and EBD

  • 2.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Futurum Academy for Health and Care Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Are children as relatives our responsibility? How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to elucidate how nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives to a parent with a serious physical illness.

    Method: A qualitative explorative design with focus group interviews was used. In total, 22 nurses working at one neurological, one haematological and two oncological wards were interviewed. The transcripts from the interviews were analysed in steps in accordance with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results: This study revealed six variations in how nurses perceived their role in the encounter with child relatives, ranging from being convinced that it is not their responsibility to being aware of the children's situation and working systematically to support them.

    Conclusion: Nurses should consider whether their patients have children who might be affected by their parent's illness. The nurses' self-confidence when meeting these children must be increased by education in order to strengthen their professional role. Furthermore, guidelines on how to encounter child relatives are required.

  • 3.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Sciences, Borås, Sweden.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Sciences.
    Decision Support Tool in Prehospital Care: A systematic Review of Randomized Trials2011In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 319-329Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the decision support tool (DST) on the assessment of the acutely ill or injured out-of-hospital patient.

    Methods: This study included systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) where the DST was compared to usual care in and out of the hospital setting. The databases scanned include: (1) Cochrane Reviews (up to January 2010); (2) Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials (1979 to January 2010); (3) Cinahl (1986 to January 2010); and (4) Pubmed/Medline (1926 to January 2010). In addition, information was gathered from related magazines, prehospital home pages, databases for theses, conferences, grey literature and ongoing trials.

    Results: Use of the DST in prehospital care may have the possibility to decrease “time to definitive care” and improve diagnostic accuracy among prehospital personnel, but more studies are needed.

    Conclusions: The amount of data in this review is too small to be able to draw any reliable conclusions about the impact of the use of the DST on prehospital care. The research in this review indicates that there are very few RCTs that evaluate the use of the DST in prehospital care.

  • 4.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Sjöqvist, Bengt-Arne
    Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, .
    Lundberg, Lars
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jonsson, Anders
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Decision support system in prehospital care: a randomized controlled simulation study2013In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 145-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Prehospital emergency medicine is a challenging discipline characterized by a high level of acuity, a lack of clinical information and a wide range of clinical conditions. These factors contribute to the fact that prehospital emergency medicine is a high-risk discipline in terms of medical errors. Prehospital use of Computerized Decision Support System (CDSS) may be a way to increase patient safety but very few studies evaluate the effect in prehospital care. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a CDSS.

    Methods: In this non-blind block randomized, controlled trial, 60 ambulance nurses participated, randomized into 2 groups. To compensate for an expected learning effect the groups was further divided in two groups, one started with case A and the other group started with case B. The intervention group had access to and treated the two simulated patient cases with the aid of a CDSS. The control group treated the same cases with the aid of a regional guideline in paper format. The performance that was measured was compliance with regional prehospital guidelines and On Scene Time (OST).

    Results: There was no significant difference in the two group's characteristics. The intervention group had a higher compliance in the both cases, 80% vs. 60% (p < 0.001) but the control group was complete the cases in the half of the time compare to the intervention group (p < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The results indicate that this CDSS increases the ambulance nurses' compliance with regional prehospital guidelines but at the expense of an increase in OST.

  • 5.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Sjöqvist, Bengt-Arne
    Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jonsson, Anders
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    The effect of a Computerized Decision Support System on prehospital assessment: results of an interrupted time-series studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås, Insitutionen för vårdvetenskap.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Högskolan i Borås, Insitutionen för vårdvetenskap.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Exclusion of context knowledge in the development of prehospital guidelines: results produced by realistic evaluation2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Prehospital work is accomplished using guidelines and protocols, but there is evidence suggesting that compliance with guidelines is sometimes low in the prehospital setting. The reason for the poor compliance is not known. The objective of this study was to describe how guidelines and protocols are used in the prehospital context.

    Methods

    This was a single-case study with realistic evaluation as a methodological framework. The study took place in an ambulance organization in Sweden. The data collection was divided into four phases, where phase one consisted of a literature screening and selection of a theoretical framework. In phase two, semi-structured interviews with the ambulance organization's stakeholders, responsible for the development and implementation of guidelines, were performed. The third phase, observations, comprised 30 participants from both a rural and an urban ambulance station. In the last phase, two focus group interviews were performed. A template analysis style of documents, interviews and observation protocols was used.

    Results

    The development of guidelines took place using an informal consensus approach, where no party from the end users was represented. The development process resulted in guidelines with an insufficiently adapted format for the prehospital context. At local level, there was a conscious implementation strategy with lectures and manikin simulation. The physical format of the guidelines was the main obstacle to explicit use. Due to the format, the ambulance personnel feel they have to learn the content of the guidelines by heart. Explicit use of the guidelines in the assessment of patients was uncommon. Many ambulance personnel developed homemade guidelines in both electronic and paper format. The ambulance personnel in the study generally took a positive view of working with guidelines and protocols and they regarded them as indispensable in prehospital care, but an improved format was requested by both representatives of the organization and the ambulance personnel.

    Conclusions

    The personnel take a positive view of the use of guidelines and protocols in prehospital work. The main obstacle to the use of guidelines and protocols in this organization is the format, due to the exclusion of context knowledge in the development process.

  • 7. Hamlin, Maria
    et al.
    Jemsson, Monica
    Rahm, Ann-Sofie
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Patienters upplevelse av delaktighet i sin självdialys: en intervjustudie2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To suffer from kidney failure requiring dialysis is a major setback on the patient’s life situation. The trend in dialysis care is that the patients should be increasingly involved in their own dialysis treatment. The aim of this study was to illustrate the patients’ experiences of participation in their own dialysis treatment. A qualitative approach was chosen and the study consists of nine narrative interviews with patients in self-care dialysis who had hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis at two different hospitals. The results are categorized into the areas of safety and freedom. In order to feel safe the patients must have good knowledge of their disease and dialysis treatment. Patients experience freedom when they participate in their own dialysis treatment and may manage their dialysis schedule. The result also shows that the patients perceive themselves to be healthier when they are able to perform their own dialysis. The major challenge for today’s dialysis care is to involve the patients more in their own treatment and to offer them greater flexibility.

  • 8.
    Haraldsson, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Conlon, Lisa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    The experiences of ICU patients during follow-up sessions: A qualitative study2015In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Evidence supports the recommendation for follow-up session(s) for patients after discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of these follow-up sessions is to allow patients to express and discuss their experiences and problems following their time in an ICU. To optimise the knowledge gained from the follow-up session experience, it is necessary to describe how patients experience these sessions. The aim of this study was to describe how ICU-patients, experience a follow-up session.

    Design/setting

    This study adopted a qualitative design utilising semi-structured interviews, and which examined the experiences of seven men and five women. Qualitative content analysis was utilised.

    Findings

    The participants stated that the information gained from these sessions, which had previously seemed unclear to some of them, was, on the whole, now clarified and confirmed. A discernible difference was found between participants who were cared for on a general ward and those who were cared for on a rehabilitation ward and also were offered a meeting with a counsellor, following discharge their from the ICU. The findings also indicated that participants who were not offered psychosocial support showed a greater need for a follow-up session.

    Conclusion

    This study has highlighted the need for increasing collaboration between intensive care staff and staff in other units to provide support to this patient group in order to reduce their suffering post intensive care experience.

  • 9.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Diskussion2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 471-479Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Forskningsprocessen: problem, syfte och inledning/bakgrund2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 53-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Intensivvård2010In: Taktil beröring och lätt massage - från livets början till livets slut / [ed] Henricson, M. & Billhult, A., Studentlitteratur, 2010, p. 82-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Opponentskap och försvar2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 543-552Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Presentation av examensarbete2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 555-566Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Henricson, Maria
    University College of Borås. School of Health Sciences.
    Tactile touch in intensive care: Nurses' preparation, patients' experiences and the effects on stress parameters2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to acquire knowledge about whether tactile touch as a complementary method can (i) promote comfort and (ii) reduce stress reactions during care in an intensive care unit (ICU) Method: In Paper I, five nurses with a touch therapist training were interviewed about their experiences of preparation before giving tactile touch in an ICU. To analyse the meaning of preparation as a phenomenon, Giorgi’s descriptive phenomenological approach was used. In Paper II and III a randomised controlled trial was set up to investigate the effects of a five-day tactile touch intervention on patients’ oxytocin levels in arterial blood (II), on patients’ blood pressure, heart rate and blood glucose level, and on patients’ levels of anxiety, sedation and alertness (III). Forty-four patients were randomised to either an intervention group (n = 21) or a control group (n = 23). Data were analysed with non-parametric statistics. In Paper IV, six patients who had received the tactile touch intervention were interviewed to illuminate the experience of receiving tactile touch during intensive care. To gain a deeper understanding of the phenomenon and to illuminate the meaning, Ricoeur’s phenomenological hermeneutical method, developed by Lindseth and Norberg, was used. Findings: The nurses need four constituents (inner balance, unconditional respect for the patients’ integrity, a relationship with the patient characterized by reciprocal trust and a supportive environment) to be prepared and go through the transition from nurse to touch therapist (I). In the intervention study, no significant differences were shown for oxytocin levels between intervention and control group over time or within each day (II). There were significantly lower levels of anxiety for patients in the intervention group. There were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups for blood pressure, heart rate, the use of drugs, levels of sedation or blood glucose levels (III). The significance of receiving tactile touch during intensive care was described as the creation of an imagined room along with the touch therapist. In this imagined room, the patients enjoyed tactile touch and gained hope for the future (IV). Conclusion: Nurses needed internal and external balance to be prepared for providing tactile touch. Patients did not notice the surroundings as much as the nurses did. Patients enjoyed the tactile touch and experienced comfort. The impact on stress parameters were limited, except for levels of anxiety which declined significantly. The results gave some evidence for the benefit of tactile touch given to patients in intensive care.

  • 15.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Vetenskaplig teori och metod: Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 16. Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Berglund, Anna-Lena
    Määttä, Sylvia
    Segesten, Kerstin
    A transition from nurse to touch therapist: a study of preparation before giving tactile touch in an Intensive Crae Unit.2006In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 239-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile touch is a complementary therapy that is rarely undertaken in intensive care units (ICUs) in Sweden. This study was a part of a larger project that examines whether tactile touch can relieve the suffering of patients in the ICU. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ lived experience of preparation before giving tactile touch in an ICU. Four assistant nurses and one registered nurse, each with diplomas in tactile touch working at three different ICUs in Sweden, participated in the study. A phenomenological approach was chosen to achieve experience-based and person-centred descriptions. Data were collected through interviews and analysed following Giorgi's method. The main finding was that before providing tactile touch, the nurses needed to add the new role as touch therapists, to their professional one. The essential aspect being the transition from nurse to touch therapist. Findings included a general structure, with four constituents; a sense of inner balance, an unconditional respect for the patients’ integrity, a relationship with the patient characterised by reciprocal trust, and a supportive environment. Furthermore, the study underlines the difficulties to integrate a complementary caring act, such as tactile touch, in a highly technological environment.

  • 17. Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Berglund, Anna-Lena
    Määttä, Sylvia
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Ekman, Rolf
    The outcome of tactile touch on oxytocin in intensive care patients: a randomised controlled trial2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 19, p. 2624-2633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  To explore the effects of five-day tactile touch intervention on oxytocin in intensive care patients. The hypotheses were that tactile touch increases the levels of oxytocin after intervention and over a six-day period.

    Background.  Research on both humans and animals shows a correlation between touch and increased levels of oxytocin which inspired us to measure the levels of oxytocin in arterial blood to obtain information about the physiological effect of tactile touch.

    Design.  Randomised controlled trial.

    Method.  Forty-four patients from two general intensive care units, were randomly assigned to either tactile touch (= 21) or standard treatment – an hour of rest (= 23). Arterial blood was drawn for measurement of oxytocin, before and after both treatments.

    Results.  No significant mean changes in oxytocin levels were found from day 1 to day 6 in the intervention group (mean −3·0 pM, SD 16·8). In the control group, there was a significant (= 0·01) decrease in oxytocin levels from day 1 to day 6, mean 26·4 pM (SD 74·1). There were no significant differences in changes between day 1 and day 6 when comparing the intervention group and control group, mean 23·4 pM (95% CI −20·2–67·0).

    Conclusion.  Our hypothesis that tactile touch increases the levels of oxytocin in patients at intensive care units was not confirmed. An interesting observation was the decrease levels of oxytocin over the six-day period in the control group, which was not observed in the intervention group.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Tactile touch seemed to reduce the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Further and larger studies are needed in intensive care units to confirm/evaluate tactile touch as a complementary caring act for critically ill patients.

  • 18.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Billhult, Annika
    Förberedelse, tillvägagångssätt, effekter och påverkan2010In: Taktil beröring och lätt massage - från livets början till livets slut / [ed] Henricson, M. & Billhult, A, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2010, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Billhult, Annika
    FoU-enheten Södra Älvsborgs sjukhus.
    Kvalitativ design2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 129-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Billhult, Annika
    Taktil beröring och lätt massage: från livets början till livets slut2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Billhult, Annika
    Utbildning, Lagstiftning och Dokumentation, Kontraindikationer och Etik2010In: Taktil beröring och lätt massage - från livets början till livets slut / [ed] Henricson, M. & Billhult, A., Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2010, p. 107-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22. Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Ersson, Anders
    Määttä, Sylvia
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Berglund, Anna-Lena
    The outcome of tactile touch on stress parameters in intensive care: A randomized controlled trial2008In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 244-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of a five-day tactile touch intervention in order to find new and unconventional measures to moderate the detrimental influence of patients’ stressors during intensive care. The hypothesis was that tactile touch would decrease stress indicators such as anxiety, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, heart rate and requirements of sedative drugs and noradrenalin. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken with 44 patients, which were assigned either to tactile touch or standard treatment (a rest hour). Observations of the stress indicators were made before, during and after the intervention or standard treatment. The study showed that tactile touch led to significantly lower levels of anxiety. The circulatory parameters suggested increased circulatory stability indicated by a reduction in noradrenalin requirement. The results need to be further validated through studies with larger sample sizes.

  • 23.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    The validation of the Supervision of Thesis Questionnaire (STQ)2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 65, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The supervision process is characterized by differences between the supervisors’ and the students’ expectations before the start of writing a bachelor thesis as well as after its completion. A review of the literature did not reveal any scientifically tested questionnaire for evaluating nursing students’ expectations of the supervision process when writing a bachelor thesis.

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of a questionnaire for measuring nursing students’ expectations of the bachelor thesis supervision process.

    Design & Methods: The study had a developmental and methodological design carried out in four steps including construct validity and internal consistency reliability statistical procedures: construction of the items, assessment of face validity, data collection and data analysis.

    Settings & Participants: This study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden, where students on the “Nursing student thesis, 15 ECTS” course were consecutively selected for participation. Of the 512 questionnaires distributed, 327 were returned, a response rate of 64%.

    Results: Five factors with a total variance of 74% and good communalities, ≥0.64, were extracted from the 10-item STQ. The internal consistency of the 10 items was 0.68. The five factors were labelled: The nature of the supervision process, The supervisor's role as a coach, The students’ progression to self-support, The interaction between students and supervisor and supervisor competence.

    Conclusions: A didactic, useful and secure questionnaire measuring nursing students’ expectations of the bachelor thesis supervision process based on three main forms of supervision was created.

  • 24.
    Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Publicering av examensarbete2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 569-581Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Henricson, Maria
    et al.
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Berglund, Anna-Lena
    Määttä, Sylvia
    Enjoying tactile touch and gaining hope when being cared for in intenisve care: A phenomenological hermeneutical study2009In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch has been a part of the healing process in many civilisations and cultures throughout the centuries. Nurses frequently use touch to provide comfort and reach their patients. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of receiving tactile touch when being cared for in an intensive care unit. Tactile touch is a complementary method including the use of effleurage, which means soft stroking movements along the body. The context used to illuminate the meaning of receiving tactile touch was two general intensive care units (ICUs). Six patients, who have been cared for in the two ICUs, participated in the study. A phenomenological–hermeneutical method based on the philosophy of Ricoeur and developed for nursing research by Lindseth and Norberg [Lindseth A, Norberg A. A phenomenological hermeneutical method for researching lived experience. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 2004;18:145–53] was chosen for the analysis. Data consisted of narratives, which were analysed in three recurring phases: naïve understanding, structural analyses and comprehensive understanding. Two main themes were found: being connected to oneself and being unable to gain and maintain pleasure. The comprehensive understanding of receiving tactile touch during intensive care seems to be an expression of enjoying tactile touch and gaining hope for the future. This study reveals that it is possible to experience moments of pleasure in the midst of being a severely ill patient at an ICU and, through this experience also gain hope.

  • 26.
    Milton da Silva, Jenny
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås; Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, CIVA.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Promotion of hope in patients care for in an intensive care unit in Indonesia2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective: The aim was to describe the nurses’ perception about how to promote hope in critically ill patients, cared for in intensive care units in Indonesia.

    Background: The concept of hope and hopelessness has been in focused in nursing from various orientations as a subjective phenomenon in relation to illness experiences. There is a lack of studies examining patterns of how nurses promote hope in critically ill patients in in tensivecare.

    Design and Method: Five specialized intensive care nurses from two different intensive care units were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to a qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The patient’s hope is something personal and depends on different factors. These factors can either be a supporting system or an inhibiting factor to the nurse’s illumination of hope. Meaning, if something is very important for the patient (i.e. the family), there can be a radical difference if that person is present and supporting, present and not supporting or even not present at all.

    Conclusion: By using interventions including information, communication and religion, the nurses may release hope within the patient. This hope can be cultural and socially bound but it does not avoid the facts of the promotion that can be tailored by the nurses to individual circumstances and possibly used in other wards but also in different countries.

  • 27.
    Tingsvik, Catarina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bexell, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Meeting the challenge: ICU-nurses' experiences of lightly sedated patients2013In: Australian Critical Care, ISSN 1036-7314, E-ISSN 1878-1721, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 124-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sedation of intensive care patients is necessary for comfort and to implement appropriate treatment. The trend of sedation has gone from deep to light sedation. The topic is of interest to intensive care nursing because patients are generally more awake, which requires a different clinical approach than caring for deeply sedated patients.

    Purpose

    The aim of this study was to describe intensive care unit (ICU) nurses experiences of caring for patients who are lightly sedated during mechanical ventilation.

    Methods

    A qualitative approach was used. Semi-structured interviews with nine intensive care nurses were conducted. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis, resulting in the formulation of one main category and six sub-categories.

    Findings

    The nurses’ experience of lightly sedated patients was described as a challenge requiring knowledge and experience. The ability to communicate with the lightly sedated patient is perceived as important for ICU nurses. Individualised nursing care respecting the patients’ integrity, involvement and participation are goals in intensive care, but might be easier to achieve when the patients are lightly sedated.

    Conclusion

    The results reinforce the importance of communication in nursing care. It is difficult however to create an inter-personal relationship, encourage patient involvement, and maintain communication with deeply sedated patients. When patients are lightly sedated, the nurses are able to communicate, establish a relationship and provide individualised care. This is a challenge requiring expertise and patience from the nurses. Accomplishing this increases the nurses satisfaction with their care. The positive outcome for the patients is that their experience of their stay in the ICU might become less traumatic.

  • 28.
    Tingsvik, Catarine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hammarskjöld, Fredrik
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Patients' lived experience of intensive care when being on mechanical ventilation during the weaning process: A hermeneutic phenomenological study.2018In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 47, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The medical and nursing care of the patient on mechanical ventilation has developed and proceeds in terms of ventilator functions, sedation strategies and patient participation. New data are needed to explore the weaning process from the patients' perspective. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the meaning of being a patient on mechanical ventilation during the weaning process in the intensive care unit.

    METHODS: This study used van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Interviews were conducted, including twenty former intensive care patients from three different hospitals in Sweden.

    FINDINGS: Five themes emerged including thirteen related themes; Maintaining human dignity, Accepting the situation, Enduring the difficulties, Inadequate interaction and A sense of unreality. The experiences differed from each other and varied over time, and the same patient expressed both pleasant and unpleasant experiences. Weaning was not a separate experience but intertwined with that of being on mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit.

    CONCLUSIONS: The patient's experiences differ and vary over time, with the same patient expressing various experiences. The favourable experiences were more clearly described, compared to previous research, this might depend on factors related to communication, participation and proximity to healthcare professionals and next-of-kin.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-04-05 01:00
  • 29.
    Wallengren, Catarina
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Henricson, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Vetenskaplig kvalitetssäkring av litteraturbaserat examensarbete2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod. Från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Henricson. M, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, p. 481-496Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 29 of 29
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