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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    A four-dimensional model of mindfulness and its implications for health2014In: Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, ISSN 1941-1022, E-ISSN 1943-1562, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 162-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces a four-field model of mindfulness training and discusses its implications for health. Through the pioneering work of Kabat-Zinn and others, a vast amount of research has been conducted regarding both physical and mental mindfulness; as such, it is generally these two dimensions that are relied upon for intervention by health care professionals. While certainly a sign of progress, this article proposes that the essential next step in mindfulness training is to involve the less known social and existential dimensions as well. Indeed, it is herein argued that the addition of these two fields can serve to enhance the theory of resilience, the general promotion of human health, and the specific practice of mindfulness, especially as it relates to both group and meaning-of-life contexts. It is further argued that a more nuanced understanding of physical (a Western notion) and spiritual (an Eastern notion) mindfulness can be obtained by examining the interconnectedness of all four fields. The aim is to open the way toward a more broad, holistic, and altruistic approach to the practice of mindfulness as well as to encourage further research along these potentially productive lines.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Conceptualizing and contextualizing mindfulness: New and critical perspectives2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation aims at analyzing mindfulness as a concept and a multidimensional phenomenon in its historic and primordial but also contemporary contexts. In the course of examining this more general question, this dissertation targets four specific objectives: 1) classifying existing definitions of mindfulness, 2) critically analyzing and interpreting the Buddhist and Western interpretations and practices of mindfulness, 3) elaborating on the social and existential dimensions of mindfulness, and 4) applying these dimensions in advancing the notion of mindful sustainable aging in the context of successful aging. Paper I examines and assesses the numerous definitions of mindfulness that have been presented over the years by a wide range of scholars from a variety of disciplines. Paper II traces the roots of modern mindfulness in Buddhism. It continues by exploring the utility and practices of mindfulness in the context of social work. The definitions provided in Paper I and the Buddhist underpinnings discussed in Paper II call attention to the fact that in addition to the more commonly considered physical and mental dimensions, mindfulness contains a social and an existential dimension as well – dimensions that remain under-researched and not well understood. To redress this imbalance, Paper III elaborates on these two latter dimensions, emphasizing their potential to enhance health, wellbeing and meaning in life. Paper III further argues that a more nuanced understanding of physical, mental, social and existential mindfulness can be obtained by examining the interconnectedness of all four fields. Paper IV continues the discussion of the social and the existential dimensions of mindfulness with specific emphasis on their utility for successful aging, and advances the notion of mindful sustainable aging. Paper IV highlights the potential of mindfulness for living a meaningful life and boosting the elderly’s capacity to find deeper meaning in their final stage of life.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Social Studies and Didactics.
    Cultivating Mindfulness Through The Practice Of Iaidō2017In: Contemporary Buddhism, ISSN 1463-9947, E-ISSN 1476-7953, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iaidō is a Japanese swordsmanship art that teaches the practitioner, iaidokan, a series of sword techniques known as kata. The number, and severity of [sword] techniques increases as the practitioner achieves higher grades (kyu and dan). To understand and conduct the [spiritual] core of iaidō, the iaidoka must learn how to be attentive and bodily and mindfully present when carrying out these [sword] techniques. In this respect, mindfulness training could be of great help by enhancing the ability of the iaidokan skills in this regard. Additionally, mindfulness training may be used to teach the practitioner of iaidō how to develop a being-mode. This article discusses, from both an outside-in perspective, as academic researcher and an inside-out perspective as a mindfulness and iaidō practitioner, the meaning of iaidō in terms of attention, [mindfulness] meditation and a being-mode. This discussion may prepare the way for a new and inspiring understanding of Asian spiritual practices in a Western guise.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Existential social work and the quest for existential meaning and well-being: A conceptual framework2018In: Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work, ISSN 1542-6432, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 64-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to conceptualize “existential social work.” A greater understanding of what existential social work means may enable social workers and those studying social work to see how its practice can reveal “the truth” about human existence and how they, as professionals, can enhance existential meaning and existential well-being among their clients. In such work, existential social workers have at their disposal tools such as the Frankl therapeutic approach to existential analysis (i.e., logotherapy) as well as spiritual-sensitive modalities (prayer and mindfulness). To interpret and understand apparent phenomena in the therapy is the ultimate goal with existential social work practices, thus providing clients with the opportunity to discover the meaning that exists in themselves. In addition, these practices pave the way for existential well-being. 

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för teknik och samhälle.
    Hjärnans signalsystem metodologi och funktion2007In: Neurodidaktik: Om hjärnvägar och knutpunkter / [ed] Aadu Ott & Carl E. Olivestam, Göteborg: Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik, Neurodidaktiska kollegiet, Göteborgs universitet , 2007, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för teknik och samhälle.
    How Mindfulness Becomes Mindlessness – A Hermeneutical Approach2013In: Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies, ISSN 2321-2799, E-ISSN 2229-3795, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last several decades the practice of mindfulness has grown to become one of the most widespread applications in the West, so much so that it now rivals words such as yoga and meditation in terms of public recognition. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly it intends to shed light on mindfulness as a concept and practice that is rooted in Theravada Buddhism. As understood in terms of Buddhism’s ontological soteriology, mindfulness (sati) involves the practice of “right meditation” (samma sati) as a means of realizing one’s true nature, escaping the cycle of birth and death (samsara) and attaining the ultimate goal of nirvana through wisdom (panna) and the ethics of the eightfold path (magga). Secondly, this paper aims to highlight mindfulness as a popular form of intervention and therapy among health care professionals and private therapists in the West. It is fairly well accepted that mindfulness techniques such as MBSR, MBCT, DBT and ACT have been beneficial in terms of treating various illnesses. Unfortunately, in the process of transforming mindfulness (or sati) from a Buddhist soteriological to a postmodern Western ontology, the practice has lost a bit of its true soul. The paradox of mindfulness in the West is that while, on the one hand, its various modern formations have been effective when it comes to the treatment of illness, on the other, it has been commercialized as a form of quick-fix healing by certain therapists and instructors. This East-West paradox will be analyzed herein in terms of a hermeneutical approach.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Making Mindfulness: Highlighting the Social and Existential Dimensions2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Mindful hållbart åldrande – holistiskt åldrande i ny belysning2016In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 6, p. 692-703Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Socioexistential mindfulness: Bringing empathy and compassion into health care practice2016In: Spirituality in Clinical Practice, ISSN 2326-4500, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Karolinska Institutet.
    Mindfulness – terapier och paradoxer2016In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 106-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Kazemi, Ali
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mindful sustainable aging: Advancing a comprehensive approach to the challenges and opportunities of old age2015In: Europe's Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1841-0413, E-ISSN 1841-0413, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 494-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this article is to present a new concept called mindful sustainable aging (MSA), which is informed by mindfulness practices that support the physical, the mental, and especially, the social and the existential dimensions of old life. The concept of MSA is discussed and compared with four influential psychosocial theories in the field of gerontology, i.e., activity theory, disengagement theory, successful aging theory and gerotranscendence theory. The article ends with reviewing research on how mindfulness practice can help to manage, diminish and/or improve a number of serious physical conditions that are common among older people. The potential of mindfulness when it comes to facilitating for older adults in their quest for spiritual and existential meaning is discussed extensively throughout the article.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Kazemi, Ali
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    From Buddhist sati to Western mindfulness practice: A contextual analysis2016In: Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work, ISSN 1542-6432 (Print), 1542-6440 (Online), Vol. 35, no 1-2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last three decades the practice of mindfulness has grown to become one of the most widespread health promoting applications in the West—so much that terms like yoga and meditation have now become standard household words. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the meaning of mindfulness within both its Buddhist and its Western context. In the former case, the aim will be to shed light on mindfulness as a concept and practice that is rooted in Buddhist understandings (i.e., the Buddhist perspective); and in the latter case, the meaning of mindfulness will be more broadly explored in terms of its relevance to society, social work and everyday life (i.e., the social (work) perspective).

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Kazemi, Ali
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Mindfulness Therapies and Assessment Scales: A Brief Review2016In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication. School of Health and Education, University of Skövde.
    Kazemi, Ali
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde.
    Reconciling and thematizing definitions of mindfulness: The big five of mindfulness2016In: Review of General Psychology, ISSN 1089-2680, E-ISSN 1939-1552, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mindfulness is an emerging concept in many professions and spheres of social life. However, mindfulness (or sati in Buddhism) can connote many plausible meanings. Thus, the concept is not easily defined and the definitions provided in the literature easily confuse the reader. Some mindfulness researchers offer definitions whereas others do not and take the definition of mindfulness for granted. Beyond the problem of defining mindfulness, the fact that the phenomenon is of great interest to various disciplines, each of which has its own theoretical and methodological approaches, different authors use different terms in describing this phenomenon. In the present article 33 definitions of mindfulness were extracted from a pool of 308 peer-reviewed full-length theoretical or empirical articles written in English, published between 1993 and March 2016, after systematic searches in Google Scholar, PsycARTICLES, and SocINDEX. The definitions were analyzed with a particular focus on the defining attributes or core elements of the concept of mindfulness. The analysis yielded 4 core elements of awareness and attention, present-centeredness, external events, and cultivation. Furthermore, an additional core element emerged from this analysis as being absent in Western definitions of mindfulness. This formed the basis for formulation of a new definition of mindfulness with an emphasis on ethical-mindedness. We argue that this core element is instrumental in filling in the gap that exists in current Western definitions, and with highlighting this element we hope to bridge the Western and Buddhist notions of mindfulness.

1 - 14 of 14
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