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  • 1.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Everyday Knowledge in Elder Care: An Ethnographic Study of Care Work2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is about how knowledge is constructed in interactions and what knowledge entails in practical social work. It is about how a collective can provide a foundation for the construction and development of knowledge through the interactions contextualized in this study on Swedish elder care, organized by the municipality. This study follows a research tradition that recognizes knowledge as socially constructed, and focuses on the practice of knowledge within an organizational context of care.

    This is an ethnographic study. The empirical material consists primarily of field notes from participant observations at two elder care units in a midsized city in Sweden. Moreover, the collected materials include national and municipal policy documents, local policy documents and guidelines, and notes from observations in staff meetings and interviews with care workers and managers. This thesis uses Institutional Ethnography as a departure point for analyzing the contextual factors for workers in elder care, mainly women, and the situational factors for acquiring knowledge.

    The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore knowledge in elder care practice by analyzing the construction and application of knowledge for and by staff in elder care. This sheds light to the Mystery of Knowledge in Elder Care Practice: Locally Enabled and Disabled.

    In order to pursue this aim, two questions were addressed in the study:

    1. How and what kind of knowledge is expressed and made visible in daily elder care practice?

    2. How is knowledge shared interactively in the context of elder care?

    The findings shed light to the situation for care workers in elder care and the conditions for using and gaining knowledge. This situation is problematic as the local conditions both enables and disables knowledge use and sharing of knowledge. Contributing challenging factors are lack of recognition and equal valuing of various forms of knowledge; the organizational cultures and a limiting reflective work to the individual.

    The main findings in this thesis are presented in three areas:

    - a way of understanding tacit knowledge, which refers to knowledge gained by care workers through working in elder care;

    - the connection between an organizational culture and the knowledge shared within the organizational culture;

    - reflective practice in elder care work and the imbalance between individual and collective reflectivity.

    These findings have implications for specific knowledge in social work practice and the need for education linked to this knowledge. Formal knowledge alone is insufficient for effective elder care practice; however, informal knowledge is also insufficient alone. Both are needed, and they should be linked to create synergy between the two types of knowledge.

  • 2.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    From shadow to person: Exploring roles in participant observations in an eldercare context2014In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 406-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores participant observation as a research method and more specifically addresses the intriguing situation of the researcher's role in interacting with participants in the setting. The materials used in the analysis are field notes from participant observations focused on staff at two eldercare units in a mid-sized city in Sweden. Because limitations when referring to Raymond Gold's roles of participant observations are known but sparsely described and discussed, this text attempts to provide that description and discussion. The specific question posed in the article is, (How) do roles for the researcher in participant observations change during the course of fieldwork? Randall Collins' theory on interaction ritual chains is used as an analytical tool to identify symbols in the two staff groups. The examples chosen from the field are symbols displayed at the units, which moreover illustrate that the researcher’s roles in participant observations not only change once or twice during the course of fieldwork but also change continuously. Consequently, fieldworkers shift roles in different situations when observing a variety of people and settings. Observations are developed in the interaction between the researcher and the participants; therefore, referring observations to a number of roles is restrictive and limiting.

  • 3.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    “You have to have a certain feeling for this”: Exploring tacit knowledge in elder careManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    “You have to have a certain feeling for this work”: Exploring tacit knowledge in elder care2014In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased care worker knowledge has been emphasized for improving quality of care for older persons in organized elder care in Sweden. However, care workers and national policies are not always corresponding, with observations suggesting that care workers emphasize tacit knowledge. The aim of this article is to explore the nature of this kind of knowledge and how it can be identified and described. Field notes from participant observations at two elder care units in Sweden serve as the empirical material. Knowledge use for staff in elder care is part of a process of knowledge making and knowledge shaping. Analysis of the field notes identified the themes of “feeling for work” and “acting and artistry” as parts of a tacit knowledge in elder care. The processes of knowledge and job execution are closely intertwined, making them difficult to separate or even understand without a deeper insight.

  • 5.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Henning, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    A Free regulated work?: Organizational culture and shared knowledge in elder careManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Reflection in Action: A multi-layered approach. “Cause I am good at that, you are supposed to say what you are good at these days!”Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    NISAL ‒ National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Reflection in action: implications for care work2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 285-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issue of reflective practice, as suggested by Schon. The aim is to analyze instances of reflective practice in elder care, in order to depict individual and collective work. Reflective practice is prevailing as a way of emphasizing the value of practical knowledge and enhancing its status. Reflexivity is thinking about what and why we do something. Moreover, reflexivity is a way of incorporating knowledge with our own personal selves, making it a very personal matter. Using reflective practice in elder care enables learning, leading to improved quality of care. However, individual reflection must be accompanied by collective reflection; this is crucial to improve quality of care.

  • 8.
    Lundgren, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Municipality of Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Changes in perceived psychosocial work environment in old age carefrom 2007 to 2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines changes in nursing assistants’ perceived psychosocial work environment 2007-2015 and whether there are differences between nursing homes and home care. Repeated cross-sectional surveys were conducted (summed sample N = 9400) in nursing homes and home care units. Mixed linear models with random intercept, slope and variance were used. Nursing assistants in nursing homes assess their psychosocial work environment better than nursing assistants in home care do. When analysing linear trends for the entire time period (2007-2015), we found a decline in control at work (p < .001) in both nursing homes and home care and positive trends for stimulus from work itself (nursing homes, p < .001 and home care, p = .004). This indicates that nursing assistants perceived decreasing control of their work situation and increasing stimulus from work itself over the period 2007-2015. The results indicated shifting trends when the municipality introduced different reforms, such as the act of a system of choice in the public sector and the implementation of home health care. These findings suggest that it is important for old-age care organisations to consider long-term consequences for nursing assistants’ psychosocial work environment when implementing new reforms and organizational changes.

  • 9.
    Lundgren, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Municipality of Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The association between psychosocial work environment and satisfaction with old age care among care recipients2018In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the association between nursing assistants’ perceptions of their psychosocial work environment and satisfaction among older people receiving care in nursing homes and home care. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted among people receiving care (N = 1,535) and nursing assistants (N = 1,132) in 45 nursing homes and 21 home care units within municipal old-age care. Better psychosocial work environment was related to higher satisfaction in old-age care among the recipients. Significant and stronger associations were more common in nursing homes than in home care. Perception of mastery and positive challenges at work were associated with higher recipient satisfaction both in home care and in nursing homes: social climate, perception of group work, perception of mastery, and positive challenges at work only in nursing homes. Findings suggest that recipient satisfaction may be increased by improving the psychosocial work environment for nursing assistants, both in nursing homes and in home care. 

  • 10.
    Lundgren, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Division of Social Services, Municipality of Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    The impact of leadership and psychosocial work environment on recipient satisfaction in nursing homes and home care2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the association between nursing assistants’ assessment of leadership, their psychosocial work environment, and satisfaction among older people receiving care in nursing homes and home care. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with nursing assistants (n = 1,132) and people receiving care (n = 1,535) in 45 nursing homes and 21 home care units. Direct leadership was associated with the psychosocial work environment in nursing homes and home care. Furthermore, better leadership was related to higher satisfaction among nursing assistants and older people in nursing homes. Thus, indirect leadership had no effect on recipients’ satisfaction in either nursing homes or home care. The path analysis showed an indirect effect between leadership factors and recipient satisfaction. The findings suggest that the psychosocial work environment of nursing assistants and recipient satisfaction in nursing homes can be increased by improving leadership.

  • 11.
    McCall, Mary E.
    et al.
    Samuel Merritt University, School of Nursing, Oakland, California, USA.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Integration or specialization? Similarities and differences between Sweden and the United States in gerontology education and training2017In: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education, ISSN 0270-1960, E-ISSN 1545-3847, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the similarities and differences in the education and training of gerontologists and others who work with older people in Sweden and the United States. It outlines the aging trends in both countries and assesses the level of training for those who provide care in a variety of fields. Both countries are aging, but the programs for gerontological training are quite different in the two countries, reflecting underlying cultural values. Sweden’s education is generally more oriented toward the integration of some aging education in more disciplinary fields, such as nursing and social work and thus could benefit from more specialized, aging-specific courses. The United States is highly specialized, with multiple programs in various subfields of aging (e.g., geropsychology; aging services administration) and could benefit from integrating more aging knowledge into courses in other disciplines. The authors challenge professionals to consider if there is a basic but global curriculum and/or set of competencies in gerontology that could be agreed upon. As an increasingly global village, the ability to share and learn is more easily achievable. Sweden and the United States have much to learn from each other in terms of appropriately educating and training those who support our older people.

  • 12.
    Wilinska, Monika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Informal caregivers and the social quality of their lives: a macro level analysis of Germany, Sweden and United Kingdom2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Wilinska, Monika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Börjesson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Refugees - homelessness at the global level: A challenge for social work?2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 13 of 13
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