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  • 1.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Johansson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Digital inkludering eller exkludering? Arbetslösas användning av arbets­förmedlingens webbplats2010In: Den ifrågasatte medborgaren - om utsatta gruppers relation till välfärdssystemen / [ed] Torbjörn Hjort, Philip Lalander, Roddy Nilsson, Växjö: Linnéuniversitetet , 2010, p. 69-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Johansson, Håkan
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Emerging patterns in the era of e-governance: A study of users of 'Swedish public employment service' on internet2012In: Media in the swirl / [ed] Ravi K. Dhar, Pooja Rana, New Delhi: Pentagon Press , 2012, 1, p. 114-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Almgren, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Lunds Universitet.
    Steering the Editorial Filter - User Comments as a Negotiated Space for Participation in Online News2014In: ECREA 2014 Lisboa - Communication for empowerment: citizens, markets, innovations: Book of abstracts, 2014, p. 28-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of social media applications, such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter, has offered new participatory opportunities to everyday media users. In some respects, this also marks a transformation of public space, as the broadcasting era’s “audiences” nowadays also can take on the role as participating “co-creators”. Or to put it slightly differently: Contemporary media landscape allows for new forms of coexistence between producer and user generated content. For traditional media companies, this transformation has brought both challenges and opportunities. User generated content has always played a part in media production, but the current media situation has certainly made it a more salient feature. Among online newspapers, specifically, the new opportunities to include users’ participatory practices have taken different forms. For instance, they nowadays allow for convenient Facebook-liking and users linking blog posts to articles. They also spend both time and energy on making it easier for readers to get in touch with them in order to provide pictures, information, corrections, etc. Within this context of offering new, participatory opportunities to the previous “readers”, online newspapers have also come to adapt to and develop on one specifically salient strategy: To allow readers/users to comment on articles online. Media research has already paid attention to user comments as a participatory practice. These studies have typically looked into what technological features for participation that are offered and how they enable and limit users’ participatory practices (cf. Domingo et al., 2008; Hermida & Thurman, 2008). In this paper, we take on a slightly different approach. Firstly, the paper looks into the conditions for participation in terms of topics: What content are users allowed to comment on? How do content characteristics differ between news that are made available and news that are withheld from comments? After having mapped these conditions for participation we – secondly –analyze how users actually navigate within this (conditioned) space: What news are they interested in commenting on? How does commenting vary between different kinds of articles? These questions are answered by help of an analysis of 1.100 news items and their adjacent user interface in an online news site (affiliated with a professionally produced, local newspaper). In terms of methodology we apply quantitative content analysis. Our analysis reveals that the participatory space offered to the readers is geared towards light news, whereas users themselves have clear preferences for commenting news concerning changes in their local environment, about general national politics and welfare issues. The paper concludes with a discussion on potential explanations as to why this discrepancy exists and it also further reflects on its potential implications for users’ participatory practices.

  • 4.
    Dahlgren, Peter
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Facilitating Political Participation: Young Citizens, Internet and Civic Cul­tures2008In: The International Handbook of Children, Media and Culture / [ed] Kirsten Drotner and Sonia Livingstone, Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publication , 2008, p. 493-507Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dahlgren, Peter
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Transforming audiences, transforming societies: A Swedish story2011In: Overview of European Audience research: Research report of the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies / [ed] Helena Bilandzic, Nico Carpentier, Geoffroy Patriarche, Cristina Ponte, Kim C. Schröder, Emilie Vossen and Frauke Zeller, Brussels: European COST , 2011, , p. 4p. 156-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Kramp, Leif
    et al.
    Carpentier, NicoHepp, AndreasTomanic Trivundza, IlijaNieminen, HannuKunelius, RistoOlsson, TobiasJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.Sundin, EbbaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.Kilborn, Richard
    Journalism, Representation and the Public Sphere2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Communication and Media, Lund University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    A Generational Thing? The Internet and New Forms of Social Intercourse2012In: Continuum. Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, ISSN 1030-4312, E-ISSN 1469-3666, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 487-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the work of Karl Mannheim this article analyses the internet as a generational phenomenon. It makes use of two different, but in generational terms interrelated empirical materials. In the first case study, data from focus group interviews and individual interviews with a total 55 young Swedes (15-25 years). These data reveal how young Swedes tend to understand illegal file sharing as a generational issue. Among other things, they consider themselves rather than middle-aged politicians to be the actual legal authorities within the area.

    The second case study is based on a youth council, Lunds ungdomsting. The research project started with an ambition to understand the internet's role in engaging young people. The initial analyses, however, revealed that although the internet plays a role, it cannot usefully be separated from other activities. We consider and analyse this observation through Mannheim's terminology: the youth council members' generational experience of the internet has naturalized it as a form of communication in a manner that makes distinctions between online and offline action obsolete.

  • 8.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Surveillance and File-Sharing: Two Issues Engaging the Unengaged2010In: International Journal of Learning and Media, ISSN 1943-6068, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade a great deal of research attention has been paid to the Internet as a potential vehicle for civic and/or political engagement among young people. Many of these analyses have been looking (or perhaps hoping) for a simple cause-and-effect relationship. Young people seem uninterested in traditional forms of politics, but they are very interested in Internet use—so in what ways might the Internet be able to “bring them back” to politics? Research has often treated the Internet as a potential resource for making the unengaged engaged, as well as a useful resource for already engaged young people. Drawing on recently conducted focus groups with various groups of young people (15–25 years old), this article analyzes a different relationship between the Internet and “unengaged” young people: how young people's Internet practices sometimes become their very reason for engagement. In the focus groups this kind of interest arose in respect of two interrelated aspects of the interviewees' everyday Internet use: their file-sharing practices and the threat of surveillance. The article presents young people's constructions of these themes—that is, how young people themselves perceive and make sense of them. The article's concluding section contextualizes these findings, mainly by relating them to the current success of the Swedish Piracy Party (Piratpartiet), which made it to the European Parliament in the elections of June 2009. The party has ideologically profiled itself around these issues and has been successful in attracting young people. Finally, the article discusses the findings in the light of theories of generations.

  • 9.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    For Activists, For Potential Voters, For Consumers: Three Modes of Pro­ducing the Civic Web2008In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, numerous studies of the internet's civic dimensions have taught us a considerable amount about the form of new technologies. They have, for instance, analysed how the internet's interactive character, its multimodality and its open character create civic opportunities, not least for young people. The field has, however, rather neglected a number of important issues. For instance, the category of 'producers' of civic content has received little attention. Hence, research has neglected questions such as the following. What interests inspire producers of civic websites? How is the production being carried through? What views of the internet inspire their work? This article begins to redress this neglect by analysing the producers of three different websites. The three websites are brought from different spheres of civil society - party politics, commercial media and activism - and they are analysed through producer interviews. The article reveals and critically discusses differences and similarities between different modes of producing civic web resources.

  • 10.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    From the Ecology of Broadcasting to the Ecology of Participation: Critical Reflections2010In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 31, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Media Ecology from McLuhan to Jenkins: A Discussion2009In: 19 Nordiska konferensen för medie- och kommunikationsforskning: Karlstad 13-15 augusti 2009., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Medievardagen: En introduktion till kvalitativa studier2008Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Offentlighet2009In: Mediesamhället: Centrala begrepp / [ed] Peter Berglez & Ulrika Olausson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Surveillance: An Issue engaging the Unengaged2009In: 19 Nordiska konferensen för medie- och kommunikationsforskning: Karlstad 13-15 augusti 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    The Internet and Young People's Civic Engagement: Reflections from European Focus Groups2009In: 5th ECPR General Conference: 10-12 September 2009 – Potsdam Universität, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    The Practises of Internet Networking: A Resource for Alternative Political Movements2008In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 659-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past ten years, the political significance of the Internet has become a recurrent theme within the social science literature, with questions centring on the Internet's part in the emergence of political movements and in the reshaping of people's roles as citizens. These discussions have been predominantly theoretical and deterministic in nature, with the political significance of the Internet being viewed as a consequence of its features; for example, the Internet's network structure is addressed within this literature as a forerunner to a politics following network logic. For the most part, extant research has not told us much about the Internet's significance in individuals' everyday political engagement. This article aims to modestly compensate for this shortcoming by presenting empirical results from a study on the perception and use of the Internet among young people in four alternative political movements. Specifically, by drawing on semi-structured interviews with twenty-one activists and viewing the interview data through the lens of the 'network metaphor', the article illustrates and discusses three different networking practises in which the Internet is an important resource: (1) the activists' use of the Internet to maintain their organizations' network-like character, (2) their use of the Internet for networking within their organizations, and (3) their use of the Internet for networking in between different, alternative political organizations. The article concludes by discussing the potential significance of these networking practises for politics, and presenting a comparative outlook towards a similar, previous study of young members within established political parties' youth organizations.

  • 17.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    There is No Public Sphere Without the Public: An Interview with Slavko Splichal2010In: Mediální studia, ISSN 1801-9978, no 1, p. 64-72Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    “We’re No Playground for Maniacs”: Local Newspapers and Users’ Participatory Practices2011In: First conference of the COST Action IS0906: University of Zagreb, 7-9 April, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    What’s so ’Social’ about Social Media: Critical Reflections on the Emerging Ecology of Participation2011In: Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies 3: London, 1-2 September, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Johansson, Håkan
    Emerging Patterns of Inclusion and Exclusion in the Era of E-government: A Study of Users of ‘Swedish Public Employment Service’ on the Internet2008In: IAMCR 2008 International Conference (Stockholm 20-25 July 2008), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Albero, MagdalenaUniversidad Autónoma de Barcelona.
    A Qualitative Analysis of European Web Based Civic Participation Among Young People2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Carpentier, Nicoet al, et al
    Media and Communication Studies Intersections and Interventions2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Carpentier, NicoPruulmann-Vengerfeldt, PilleNordenstreng, KaarleHartmann, MarenVihalemm, PeeterCammaerts, BartNieminen, Hannu
    Democracy, Journalism, and Technology: New Developments in an Enlarged Europe. The intellectual work of ECREA's 2008 European media and communication doctoral summer school2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Dahlgren, Peter
    Lunds universitet.
    Internet som resurs för unga medborgare: Är nätet AC/DC?2009In: Samhälle, teknik och lärande / [ed] Thomas Karlsohn, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 34-49Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Dahlgren, Peter
    Lunds universitet.
    Introduction2010In: Young People, ICTs and Democracy: Theories, Policies, Identities and Websites / [ed] Olsson, Tobias & Dahlgren, Peter, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2010, 1, p. 9-16Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Dahlgren, PeterLunds universitet.
    Young People, ICTs and Democracy: Theories, Policies, Identities and Websites2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Hjorth, Malin
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    For Mainstream and Alternative Activism: A Comparative Look at How Young Activists Navigate within the Converging Media World2009In: Merz: medien+erziehung, ISSN 0176-4918, no 6.09, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    A Qualitative Analysis of European Web Based Civic Participation Among Young People: Swedish National Report2009Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lunds universitet.
    A Youth Council and the Internet: Engaging Youth in Municipal Politics2010In: ECREA 2010 - 3rd European Communication Conference: Hamburg, 12-15 oktober, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    From Pirates to Politicians: The Story of the Swedish File Sharers who Be­came a Political Party2008In: Democracy, Journalism, and Technology: New Developments in an Enlarged Europe. The intellectual work of ECREA's 2008 European media and communication doctoral summer school / [ed] Nico Carpentier et.al, Tartu: Tartu University Press , 2008, p. 203-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lunds universitet.
    Invited but Ignored: How ungtval.se Aimed to Foster but Failed to Promote Young Engagement2010In: Young People, ICTs and Democracy: Theories, Policies, Identities and Websites / [ed] Olsson, Tobias & Dahlgren, Peter, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2010, p. 231-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    Invited but Ignored: How www.ungtval.se Aimed to Foster but Failed to Promote Youth Engagement2008In: Politics: Web 2.0: An International Con­ference (London, April 2008), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    Pirate Bay: From Pirates to Politicians2008In: Politics: Web 2.0: An Interna­tional Conference (London, April 2008), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Miegel, Fredrik
    Lund University.
    The Production of Civic Websites: Sweden2008Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Olsson, Åsa
    ICTs, teachers and the so called digital natives: A case study of professional appropriation2010In: Media and Communication Studies Intersections and Interventions / [ed] Carpentier, N. et al, Tartu: Tartu University Press , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulli
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Viscovi, Dino
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    At risk of exclusion? Degrees of ICT access and literacy among senior citizens2019In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data derived from a nationwide postal survey (n = 1264) with a simple random sample of Swedes between ages 65 and 85 (response rate: 63%), the article analyses the general patterns of: (a) degrees of information and communication (ICT) access and (b) ICT-literacy among Swedish senior citizens. The overall patterns of access and literacy are analysed in light of senior citizens’ assets – conceptualized as material, discursive and social resources – and their age and gender. The analysis reveals a positive correlation between levels of material (e.g., income), discursive (e.g., English skills) and social (e.g., social networks) resources and access to ICT. With greater resources, the average number of devices increases. The analysis also reveals a positive correlation between discursive and social resources and ICT-literacy. Gender has no bearing on access to devices, but might have some effect on ICT-literacy. The correlation between age, access and literacy is negative. With increasing age, both access and literacy decreases. In this respect, the study reveals a generational effect. However, since all three resources tend to decrease over the life cycle, the results are also discussed in terms of an age effect. These data and our analyses are contextualized by a critical discussion that reflects on the implications of these general patterns: What do they mean for senior citizens’ abilities to be included and participate in a continuously digitalizing society?

  • 37.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulli
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Viscovi, Dino
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Senior Citizens’ ICT Access, Use and Literacy: How Material Resources Matter2016In: ECREA 2016 Abstract Book, Prague: CZECH-IN , 2016, p. 37-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to international statistics, Sweden is one of the world’s most internet connected nations. The most recent data reveal that approximately 90per cent of all Swedes have online access through various devices, such as computers and/or mobile phones. The fact that online access is widespread hasbeen interpreted as a useful opportunity. Among governmental agencies it has been referred to as an opportunity to make public services more availableand effective. Also healthcare has become a part of this. With the advent of online portals for health information and communication, Swedish healthcareagencies hope to be able to provide better services, but also to make their contacts with care seekers and patients more efficient. The ambition to make allkinds of societal services more accessible and effective via online applications presupposes a number of important prerequisites. It presupposes widespreadaccess to devices and ICT-applications. It further presupposes that all citizens, who are the inscribed users, have competence and skills enough to also makeuse of them. For research, senior citizens make up a specifically interesting category of citizens in this context. They have lived through the transformationsfrom analogue to digital services and are also expected to start to adapt to them. According to general, national statistics, however, their levels of access toand use of ICT-applications are clearly lower than for younger people. Meanwhile, senior citizens are by no means a coherent group of ICT-users. Hence, it isvital to attend to differences between and similarities within the overall category “senior citizens” in order to gain insights into what these transformationsmean in terms of “inclusion in” or potential “exclusion from” for varying groups of citizens. In this paper we depart from and aim to further develop the conceptmaterial resources (Murdoch et al., 1992; Warschauer, 2003; Olsson, 2007) – here measured by an index including household income and home ownership– when analysing different groups of senior citizens as ICT users. To what extent do senior citizens’ varying access to material resources influence…• …their access to various ICT-devices (computers, smart phones, iPads, etc.)? • …the ways in which these devices are put to use? • …their perceivedlevels of ICT-literacy? The paper presents and analyses data from a recent Swedish survey (November 2015-January 2016). Data are derived from a nationalSRS of 2000 senior citizens (+65 years), with a response rate of 64 percent. Out initial analyses reveal that access to material resources are influencing allof the above mentioned aspects (access to devices, use of devices, perceived literacy, and more). The correlation is, as expected, positive: with increasingresources, follows increasing access, use and sense of literacy. In the light of these data the paper problematizes emerging patterns of digital inclusion andexclusion among senior citizens and their potential societal consequences.

  • 38.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Svensson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Organized producers of net culture: Theoretical approach and empirical illustrations2009In: Communicative approaches to politics and ethics in Europe / [ed] Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt et al., Tartu: Tartu University Press , 2009, p. 99-112Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Svensson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Reaching and Including Digital Visitors: Swedish Museums and Social Demand2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Viscovi, Dino
    “What Have You Done to End-Up There”?: Editing UGC at a Swedish Local Newspaper2011In: Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies 3: London, 1-2 September 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Samuelsson, Ulli
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Digital inequality in primary and secondary education: findings from a systematic literature review2014In: Media and education in the digital age: concepts, assessments, subversions / [ed] Matteo Stocchetto, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, p. 41-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Sundin, Ebba
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Pruulman-Vengerfeldt, PilleUniversity of Tartu, Estonia.Kilborn, RichardOlsson, TobiasJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.Nieminen, HannuUniversity of Helsinki, Finland.Carpentier, NicoVrije University, Brussels Belgium.Nordenstreng, Kaarle
    Communication Approaches to Politics and Ethics in Europe: The Intellectual Work of the 2009 ECREA European Media and Communication Doctoral Summer School2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Tomanic Trivundza, Ilija
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    Carpentier, NicoFree University of Brussels, Belgium.Nieminen, HannuUniversity of Helsinki, Finland.Pruulman-Vengerfeldt, PilleUniversity of Tartu, Estonia.Kilborn, RichardUniversity of Stirling, UK.Olsson, TobiasJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.Sundin, EbbaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Critical perspectives on the European mediasphere: The intellectual work of the 2011 ECREA European media and communication doctoral summer school2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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