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  • 1.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 306-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health is an important issue in daily life, but little is known about occupational therapy (OT) students’ views on these matters.

    Aim: To explore occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health in their future professional role.

    Material and methods: A descriptive qualitative study involving 37 OT students in 5 focus groups was performed and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: Three categories: ‘Sexual health is part of occupational therapy and but not of the OT educational program’; ‘Need for knowledge to identify and intervene related to sexual health problems’; and finally, ‘Communication about sexual health—unknown, untried, but necessary’, formed the theme, ‘Willing to try, wanting to know more, and recognizing not only the difficulties and challenges but also the importance of sexual health in OT practice’.

    Conclusions: OT-students consider sexual health as part of OT-practice, but experience lack of knowledge of sexual health related to disease/disability, cultural diversity, and age and sexual orientation. Educational programs need to cover these matters, including how to address sexual health in OT-practice, to enhance OT’s future competence related to promotion of sexual health for clients.

    Significance: Knowledge on students’ views are vital to guide education on this important, rather neglected, area. 

  • 2.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Barnett, Tania
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Olov
    Lund University.
    Siljehav, Jessica
    Lund University.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Chee, Derserri Y.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Viewpoints of adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders on public transport2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 163-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Public transport is low cost, allows for independence, and facilitates engagement and participation for non-drivers. However, the viewpoints of individuals with cognitive disabilities are rarely considered. In Australia, the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is approximately 1% and increasing. Many individuals with ASD do not possess a driver's licence, indicating that access to public transport is crucial for their independence. However, at present, there is no research on the opinions of adults with ASD on public transport. Aim: To identify the viewpoints of adults with ASD regarding the barriers and facilitators of public transport usage and their transportation preferences, and to contrast these against the viewpoints of neurotypical adults. Methods: Q. method was used to identify the viewpoints of both participant groups on public transport. Participants consisted of 55 adults with a diagnosis of ASD and a contrast group of 57 neurotypical adults. Both groups completed a Q sort task which took place in either Perth or Melbourne, Australia. Results: The most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to use public transport over driving and believed that it supported their independence. This viewpoint also indicated that both groups preferred to use electronic ticketing when using public transport. Interestingly, the second most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to drive themselves by private car rather than use public transport. Discussion: It appears that the viewpoints of adults with and without ASD regarding public transportation were largely similar. However, questions arose about whether the preference for public transport in the ASD group may be more a result of difficulties obtaining a driving licence than a deliberate choice. The only barrier specified by adults with ASD related to crowding on public transport. Safety and convenience in relation to location and timing of services were barriers reported by neurotypical adults.

  • 3.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Digital tools to support social engagement and thereby health and quality of life in older adults at risk for mental health decline - An evidence map2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Funktionellt åldrande.2011In: Äldre och åldrande.: Grundbok i gerontologi. / [ed] Marie Ernsth Bravell, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB , 2011, p. 142-167Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Funktionellt åldrande.2013In: Äldre och åldrande: Grundbok i gerontologi / [ed] Marie Ernsth-Bravell, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2013, 2, p. 119-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Mobila geriatriska team – en treårsuppföljning med fokus på hälsoeffekter2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Occupational participation through community mobility among older men and women2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the present thesis was to explore and characterise occupational participation and community mobility from an occupational perspective of health and well-being, and to elucidate potential barriers and facilitators for occupational participation and community mobility in older men and women.

    In Study I, questionnaires were sent to a sample of older citizens (75+) in three Swedish mid-sized municipalities. This survey focused on actual and preferred travel opportunities and was returned by 957 persons (response rate 46%). Although older people appreciated the existing travel opportunities, there was evidence of restricted community mobility for some sub-groups of older people, due to various perceived barriers. More efforts must be put into accessibility improvements including usability from the perspective of older people.

    In Study II nine focus group interviews with a total of 42 participants (20 men) were conducted, focusing on older peoples’ motives for, and experiences of, community mobility and occupational participation outside the home. The main category “Continuing mobility and occupational participation outside the home in old age is an act of negotiation” summarised the findings. This main category was abstracted from the generic categories “Occupational means and goals”, “Occupational and mobility adaptation” and “Occupational barriers and facilitators”, and their subcategories. Community mobility was identified as an important occupation that in itself also facilitated occupational participation outside the home. Individual community mobility seemed to be influenced by, for example, age and gender, as well as habits acquired over time. Furthermore, community mobility was negatively affected not only by physical barriers, but also by social and attitudinal barriers in the public environment.

    Study III identified and described older people’s viewpoints on community mobility and occupational participation in older age through a Q-methodology study conducted with 36 participants, including men and women, both drivers and non-drivers. Three viewpoints were found and assigned content-descriptive denominations; viz.: “Prefer being mobile by car”, “Prefer being mobile by public transport” and “Prefer flexible mobility”. Unfortunately, the existing demand-responsive Special Transportation Systems was not considered an attractive enough alternative by any of the participants. Thus, intermediate community mobility options are needed for those who no longer can drive or use public transport. In

    Study IV factors associated with community mobility, and decreased community mobility over time, for older men and women were described. Data were based on the Gender study “Aging in men and women: a longitudinal study of gender differences in health behaviour and health among elderly” and collected through surveys in 1994 and 2007. The base-line sample consisted of 605 twin-pairs, i.e., 1,210 individuals, aged 69-88, and the follow-up of 357 individuals (165 men and 192 women), aged 83-97. This surveycovered health and health-related issues including community mobility and occupational participation. Continuing community mobility was cross-sectionally (at follow-up) and prospectively (from baseline to follow-up) associated with better self-reported subjective health rather than self-reported health conditions for both men and women. For men, community mobility was also cross-sectionally associated with few or non-existant depressive symptoms, while reduced community mobility was prospectively associated with higher age for women. Consequently, interventions aiming to enable community mobility must move beyond interventions directed towards health conditions and instead target subjective health and well-being.

  • 8.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Samrehab, Värnamo Hospital, Värnamo, Jönköping County Council, Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Factors influencing the use of evidence based practice among physiotherapists and occupational therapists in their clinical work2016In: The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences & Practice, ISSN 1540-580X, E-ISSN 1540-580X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 1-13, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a process through which research is applied in daily clinical practice. Occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) are expected to work in line with EBP in order to optimise health care resources. This expectation is too seldom fulfilled. Consequently, research findings may not be implemented in clinical practice in a timely manner, or at all. To remedy this situation, additional knowledge is needed regarding what factors influence the process of EBP among practitioners. The purpose of the present study was to identify factors that influence the use of EBP and the experienced effects of the use of EBP among PTs and OTs in their clinical work.

    Method: This was a qualitative interview study that consisted of six group interviews involving either OTs or PTs employed by the Jönköping County Council in the South of Sweden. Resulting data were analysed using content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in the following categories: “definition of evidence and EBP”, “sources of evidence”, “barriers to acquiring evidence and to using evidence in clinical work”, “factors that facilitate the acquisition of evidence and the use of evidence in clinical work”, and “personal experiences of using EBP”. Basing clinical practice on scientific evidence evoked positive experiences, although an ambivalent view towards acting on clinical experience was evident. Participants reported that time for and increased knowledge about searching for, evaluating, and implementing EBP were needed.

    Conclusion: Because OTs are more oriented towards professional theories and models, and PTs are more focused on randomised controlled trials of interventions, different strategies appear to be needed to increase EBP in these two professions. Management support was considered vital to the implementation of EBP. However, the personal obligation to work in line with EBP must also be emphasised; the participants apparently underestimate its importance.

  • 9.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Continuing Mobility and Occupational Participation Outside the Home in Old Age is an Act of Negotiation2011In: Activities, Adaptation & Aging, ISSN 0192-4788, E-ISSN 1544-4368, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 275-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facilitated by mobility, occupational participaton is vital in old age. However, the relative importance of other influencing factors remains unclear. The present study describes older people's motives for, and experiences of, mobility and occuoational participation outside the home. Nine focus group interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Occupational participation and mobility was individually experienced even if some subjective perspectives were common. Continuing mobility and occupational participation outside the home in old age is an act of negotiation, encompassing occupational means and goals, occupational and mobility adaptation, and occupational barrieres and facilitators.

  • 10.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Community mobility in older men and women - a cross-sectional and 13 years prospective perspective2014In: Age well: Challenges for individual and society, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. In the present study factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women were identified. Gender-balanced data from a project entitled "Aging in men and women: a longitudinal study of gender differences in health behavior and health among elderly" (GENDER) based on pairs of unlike-sex twins were utilized. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47 % of men and 45 % of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  • 11.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Dahl, Anna K.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Changes in community mobility in older men and women. A 13-year prospective study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e87827-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. The present study describes factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47% of men and 45% of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  • 12.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Community mobility in older men and women - a cross-sectional and 13 years prospective perspective2014In: Sharing traditions Creating futures, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. La Trobe University, Melbourne.
    Reliability of the Swedish Translation of the Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT-S)2014In: Sharing traditions, creating futures, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria , Australia.
    The inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the Self-care and Transfer scales, and intra-rater reliability of all scales of the Swedish Translation of the Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT-S)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy (AusTOMs-OT) are used internationally to measure the outcomes of occupational therapy services across diagnoses, ages, and health care settings. This study reports on the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the Self-care and Transfer scales as well as the intra-rater reliability of all scales of the Swedish (AusTOMs-OT-S) translation.

    Methods: Fifteen occupational therapists rated 11 case study clients on two occasions, separated by two weeks. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability were calculated for the Self-care scale and Transfer scales. Moreover, intra-rater reliability was calculated for each of the 15 therapists across all 12 scales.

    Results: The inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were all found to be high to very high, ranging from ICC 0.762 to 0.904; the intra-rater reliability coefficients were also very good with 11 of the 15 therapists achieving ICCs of 0.745 or over, and finally the test-retest ICCs were also found to be high, ranging from 0.705 to 0.920.

    Conclusions: Although further research is required to confirm reliability, preliminary reliability of the AusTOMs-OT Swedish translation has been demonstrated and therapists can have confidence when using the scales.

  • 15.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Physical function factors associated with life-space mobility in later life2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Svensson, Helena
    Older people and local public transit; mobility effects of accessibility improvements in Sweden2010In: WFOT 15th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Sharing the World of Occupation from Latin America, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fysisk aktivitet och träning - möjlig prevention av arbetsrelaterade belastningsbesvär2015Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Johansson, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Vardagsaktiviteter i Sverige – bland personer födda i Sverige respektive personer födda på västra Balkan2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Jönsson, Lena
    Londos, Yvonne
    Timén, Ewa
    AusTOMs för arbetsterapi.: Svensk version (1.0) av Australian Therapy Outcome Measures for Occupational Therapy2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet och Futurum, Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Validitet och reliabilitet för Life-Space Assessment (LSA) - ett instrument för bedömning av äldre personers mobilitet2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Förmågan och möjligheter att förflytta (mobilitet) begränsas ofta i senare delen av livet, med negativa konsekvenser fördelaktighet i dagliga och sociala aktiviteter. Såväl i praktisk verksamhet som för forskning behövs instrument som kanbedöma mobilitet. The Life Space Assessment (LSA), utvecklat i USA, är bedömer en individs mobilitet genom attfokusera på förmågan att ta sig till olika “life-spaces”, från rummet där personen sover till platser bortom hemorten undersenaste månaden. LSA beaktar dessutom hur ofta detta sker, och om det sker med hjälpmedel eller hjälp av annanperson.

    Syfte: Syftet var att undersöka samtidig validitet och testa reliabilitet av LSAs svenska version.

    Metod: LSA översattes till svenska och inkluderades tillsammans med andra hälsorelaterade mått i en populationsbaserad studiemed slumpmässigt utvalda personer mellan 75 och 90 år (medelålder 81 år) i enskilt boende. LSA summerades till fyrapoängsummor, dvs total, oberoende, assisterad och maximal life-space poäng. 298 individer ingick i reliabilitetstudienoch besvarade LSA vid två tillfällen med 14 dagars mellanrum. 312 individer ingick i validitetsstudien där LSA jämfördesmed andra mobilitetsrelaterade mått.

    Resultat/preliminärt resultat: Det fanns inga signifikanta skillnader mellan skattningarna över tid för LSA fyra poängsummor. Medelvärdet för total life-space poäng var t ex 65 (22) och 65 (23) (max 120). Korrelationsvärden (ICC) mellan 0.84-0.94 visar på god till utmärktreliabilitet för total, oberoende och assisterad LSA. Vad gäller validitet påvisas signifikanta (p<0.01) och måttligt till godakorrelationer (0.50- 0.75) mellan LSAs fyra poängsummor och förmåga till förflyttning (överflyttning, balans, uppresningoch gångförmåga), transport (vardagliga resor och nöjesresor), och aktivitet i samhället (inköp och fritid)

    Slutsats: Den svenska versionen av LSA har god validitet samt god till utmärkt reliabilitet och kan med förtroende användas för attbedöma mobilitet hos äldre i enskilt boende.

  • 21.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Concurrent validity of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), developed in the USA, is an instrument focusing on mobility with respect to reaching different areas defined as life-spaces, extending from the room where the person sleeps to mobility outside one's hometown. A newly translated Swedish version of the LSA (LSA-S) has been tested for test-retest reliability, but the validity remains to be tested. The purpose of the present study was to examine the concurrent validity of the LSA-S, by comparing and correlating the LSA scores to other measures of mobility.

    METHOD: The LSA was included in a population-based study of health, functioning and mobility among older persons in Sweden, and the present analysis comprised 312 community-dwelling participants. To test the concurrent validity, the LSA scores were compared to a number of other mobility-related variables, including the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) as well as "stair climbing", "transfers", "transportation", "food shopping", "travel for pleasure" and "community activities". The LSA total mean scores for different levels of the other mobility-related variables, and measures of correlation were calculated.

    RESULTS: Higher LSA total mean scores were observed with higher levels of all the other mobility related variables. Most of the correlations between the LSA and the other mobility variables were large (r = 0.5-1.0) and significant at the 0.01 level. The LSA total score, as well as independent life-space and assistive life-space correlated with transportation (0.63, 0.66, 0.64) and food shopping (0.55, 0.58, 0.55). Assistive life-space also correlated with SPPB (0.47). With respect to maximal life-space, the correlations with the mobility-related variables were generally lower (below 0.5), probably since this aspect of life-space mobility is highly influenced by social support and is not so dependent on the individual's own physical function.

    CONCLUSION: LSA was shown to be a valid measure of mobility when using the LSA total, independent LS or assistive LSA.

  • 22.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Skogar, Örjan
    Futurum - The Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mobile geriatric teams – A cost-effective way of improving patient safety and reducing traditional healthcare utilization among the frail elderly? A randomized controlled trial2019In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 14, p. 1911-1924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Demographic changes combined with costly technological progress put a financial strain on the healthcare sector in the industrialized world. Hence, there is a constant need to develop new cost-effective treatment procedures in order to optimize the use of available resources. As a response, the concept of a Mobile Geriatric Team (MGT) has emerged not only nationally but also internationally during the last decade; however, scientific evaluation of this initiative has been very scarce. Thus, the objective of this study was to perform a mixed methods analysis, including a prospective, controlled and randomized quantitative evaluation, in combination with an interview-based qualitative assessment, to measure the effectiveness and user satisfaction of MGT.

    Materials and methods: Community-dwelling, frail elderly people were randomized to an intervention group (n=31, mean age 84) and a control group (n=31, mean age 86). A two-year retrospective quantitative data collection and a prospective one-year follow-up on healthcare utilization were combined with qualitative interviews. Non-parametric statistics and difference-in-difference (DiD) analyses were applied to the quantitative data. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: No significant group differences in healthcare utilization were found before inclusion. Post intervention, primary care contact (including MGTs) increased for the MGT group. Inpatient care decreased dramatically for both groups. Hence, the increase in primary care contact for MGT patients was not accompanied by a reduction in inpatient care compared to the control group. Utilization of non-primary care was lower (p< 0.01) post-intervention in both groups.

    Conclusion: There appears to be a “natural” variation in healthcare needs over time among frail elderly people. Hence, it is vital to perform open, controlled clinical studies in tandem with the implementation of new caregiving strategies. The MGT initiative was clearly appreciated but did not fully achieve the desired reduction in healthcare utilization in this study.

    Trial registration: Retrospectively registered 09/10/2018, ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT03662945.

  • 23.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Rosell, Sandra
    Mobilt geriatriskt team - till nytta för multisjuka äldre?!2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund:Mobila geriatriska team (MGT), bestående av läkare och sjuksköterska, har visat sig vara en framgångsrik resurs förmultisjuka äldre med upprepade inläggningar, mycket läkemedel och nedsatt ADL-förmåga. På Höglandet i Jönköpingslän arbetar sedan hösten 2013 ett MGT, som utöver läkare och sjuksköterska också erbjuder insatser från sjukgymnastoch arbetsterapeut under 15 veckor eller längre. MGT inkluderar ett geriatriskt arbetssätt som beaktar helalivssituationen, genom att lindra symtom och behandla sjukdomar, motverka funktionsnedsättningar och främjadelaktighet i aktivitet, för att göra det dagliga livet så bra och tryggt som möjligt för patienten och dennes närstående.Syfte:Projektets syfte är att utvärdera effekter och upplevd nytta av MGT.Metod:Hittills har 18 patienter i åldrarna mellan 65 och 84 fått insatser av teamet och data för utvärdering samlas kontinuerligt.Telefonintervjuer genomförs efter utskrivning med patient och/eller närstående kring upplevd nytta ochförbättringsmöjligheter. En enkät till berörd personal utanför MGT avser att belysa MGT ur ett deras perspektiv. Skattningmed Katz och COPM genomförd före MGT och direkt efter avslutad MGT, utgör ytterligare data, liksom demografiskauppgifter och måluppfyllelse. Uppgifter om besök till sjukvård och inläggning året före anslutning till MGT, under MGT-perioden samt tre respektive sex månader efter MGT registreras.Resultat/preliminärt resultat:Preliminära resultat visar på nöjdhet med MGT från patient/närstående, men också personal. ADL-förmåga påverkasinte. Däremot har 19 av 25 rehabiliteringsmål utvärderats som uppfyllda. Gruppen hade året innan anslutning till MGT 71inläggningar/akutbesök och under 6 månaders MGT-anslutning är motsvarande siffra 24. Om denna förändring kvarståröver tid har ännu inte analyserats, men kommer att kunna presenteras vid Arbetsterapiforum tillsammans med data sombeskrivits under metod.Slutsats:MGT förväntas bidra till att främja målgruppens hälsa, trygghet, aktivitetsnivå och motverka återinläggningar

  • 24.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Rosén, K G
    Landräddningen- structuring human support and volunteers the app way2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale for seminar and how it relates to the conference theme:

    New and good technological solutions are needed to enable older persons to age in place, i.e., to remain living in their own housing, with safety and security as long as possible (Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology, 2011). Importantly, ageing in place is the general policy in Sweden these days (National Board of Health and Welfare, 2011) and the municipalities are responsible for supporting older persons in their own housing. On the other hand a great deal of support to older persons is informal and provided by family caregivers, i.e., partners or relatives providing basic care (Johansson, Long & Parker, 2012). Moreover, technologies supporting ageing in place are likely to influence health in a positive way from both the older persons’ and their family caregiver’s perspective.

    “Landräddningen” provides a GPS-based extended safety and support system (ESS) available through a mobile phone application or a special unit that the user wears around the wrist. Both these (app and special unit) works outside the home, while the traditional PERS (personal emergency response system) provided by the municipalities works merely inside the users’ home. Importantly, it is a vital, societal goal that everyone, regardless of age, functional ability and circumstance in life feel secure also when participating in activities outside the home and being mobile in the community. Consequently, “Landräddningen” is an innovative, technological solution that supports ageing in place, by also filling a gap in social services. The user of “Landräddningen” could let family caregivers follow their position when they feel unsafe. It is also possible to establish a safe perimeter (geo fencing) for people with impaired orientation or memory. “Landräddningen” also provide a monitoring station that in case of an unplanned incident could search for available, listed volunteers that could support users on spot or in case of emergency alert ambulance or police. Given the GPS function and net of volunteers “Landräddningen” has a geographical and sectorial cross border functionality.

    The long term goal of “Landräddningen” is that nobody shall disappear, and that all of us shall have a good chance to receive quick support. In previous research including persons with dementia (pwd) using the same ESS that “Landräddningen” builds one, carers noted that pwd were more independent when engaged in activities dependent on community mobility. Staff considered that nearly half of pwd could remain living at home due to the ESS, compared with a third amongst carers.

    Objectives/Outcomes:

    The session will introduce and describe the services provided by “Landräddningen”. It will also give insight to previous research on the ESS used by “Landräddningen” focusing on users and care givers. Finally, current research on “Landräddningen” including preliminary results will be presented both from users’, care givers, ethical and organizational perspectives. The intent is also to give insight about the effects and benefits of a service like “Landräddningen”, but also challenges when introducing and implementing a service with cross border functionality and how these challenges could be successfully handled.

    Outline plan for the session plus timings (not included in word count):

    1. Brief introduction to “Landräddningen”
    2. Previous research on “Landräddningen”
    3. Current research on “Landräddningen”
    4. Implications for service like “Landräddningen” including experiences from introducing and implementing and how implementation challenges could be successfully handled.

     

    List of key references/resources (not included in word count):

    Johansson, L., Long, H. & Parker M.G. (2012) Informal caregiving for Elders in Sweden: An Analysis of Current Policy Developments Journal of Aging and Social Policy 23, 335-353.

    Magnusson, L., Samdman, L., Rosén, K.G., & Hanson, E. (2014) Extended saftey and support systems for people with dementia living at home Jounral of Assistive Technologies (; 188-206

    National Board of Health and Welfare. (2011). Bostad i särskilt boende är den enskildes hem [Living in Nursing homes are the Individual’s home]. Stockholm: National Board of Health and Welfare.

    Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology. (2011). Teknik för äldre [Technology for older people].   Retrieved 0830, 2013, from http://teknikforaldre.se/

  • 25.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Skogar, Örjan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Mobile Geriatric Teams: a cost-effective way of improving patient safety and reducing health care u2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Äldre mäns och kvinnors perspektiv på mobilitet och delaktighet2010In: Q-metodologi En velegnet måte å utforske subjektivitet / [ed] Arlene Arstad Thorsen och Eleanor Allgood, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk forlag , 2010, 1, p. 123-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Corr, Susan
    School of Health, the University of Northampton.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Viewpoints on community mobility and participation in older age2012In: Journal of Human Subjectivity, ISSN 1598-8643, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 103-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Community mobility supports participation in activities. However, knowledge about issues that influence community mobility and, hence, participation in activities outside the home is limited. Since participation and community mobility are subjectively defined phenomena, further knowledge from an insider’s perspective is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and describe viewpoints on community mobility and participation in older age. Methods: A Q-methodology study was conducted with 36 male and female participants, including drivers and non-drivers. Participants sorted 45 Q-statements along a most to least continuum, indicating their current habitual situation of mobility and participation in activities outside their homes. Results: Three viewpoints were found and assigned content-describing denominations; “Prefer being mobile by car, “Prefer being mobile by public transport” and “Prefer flexible mobility”. Conclusions: All participants were satisfied with their actual participation in activities outside their homes. However, those who preferred to use public transport were less satisfied with their opportunities and possibilities to participate in activities outside their homes. The existing demand-responsive Special Transportation System was not considered to be an attractive enough alternative by any of the participants. Intermediate community mobility options are thus needed for those who can no longer drive or use public transport.

  • 28.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Older People’s Views Regarding Mobility and Participation2010In: 12th International Conference on Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled People (TRANSED 2010), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fler hälsosamma år till livet genom lärande och engagemang i ett hälsofrämjande program: En utvärdering av programmet ur ett deltagarperspektiv2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    A participatory evaluation of the health promotion programme “more healthy years of life” programme among senior citizens in Sweden2018In: Cogent Medicine, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1521085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older adults have, in general, been sparsely involved in development and evaluation of programmes intended to promote their health.

    Aim: To describe older adults’ reflections on and involvement in the development and evaluation of a health promotion programme.

    Material and Method: Ten older persons participated in a health promotion programme (HPP) focusing on activity during four sessions. After each HPP session, focus group discussions were held, analysed through qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The main theme; “Being involved adds value and new experiences to life“, were built from sub-themes; “From sceptical individual to engaged group member”, “From beholder to active co-creator”, and “From individual knowledge recipient to collective knowledge sharer”.

    Conclusions: Having a leader with a gerontological competence was mentioned as important, as well as to integrate existential topics into the HPP. Social inclusion together with the possibility to influence the HPP had a positive effect on the participants and provided a sense of belonging.

    Significance: Several contributions to the development of the HPP were given, that would not have been captured without the reflections and involvement of the participants. However, more and larger studies are needed to develop strategies that enable older adult’s involvement in the development of HHP.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Dagliga aktiviteter hos äldre kvinnor som invandrat från västra Balkan - att hantera ett förändrat aktivitetsmönster2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Older women who have migrated from Western Balkan and inborn Swedish older women´s everyday occupations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Björklund, A.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupational adaptation in vulnerable EU citizens when begging in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    The use of occupational adaptation in research articles: a scoping review2018In: Occupational Therapy in Health Care, ISSN 0738-0577, E-ISSN 1541-3098, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 422-439Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this scoping review was to identify and describe how occupational adaptation has been used in different research studies published from 1992 to 2015 and to identify possible gaps in study design. Four categories of studies were identified: those focused on understanding how occupational adaptation occurs in different life situations and different health conditions, those focused on the use of occupational adaptation as a guide or model in organizing the occupational therapy process, and those using occupational adaptation as a part of instrument development. Several gaps in research are evident including updating the theory development on occupational adaptation, types of maladaptation, studies conducted in less affluent countries, quantitative studies with robust designs, inclusion of men and younger persons as subjects, vulnerable groups, health promotion, and community settings.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupational adaptation in vulnerable EU citizens when begging in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Johansson, Ann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Boström, Martina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupational challenges and adaptations of vulnerable EU citizens from Romania begging in Sweden2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 200-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: People from European Union (EU) countries such as Latvia, Romania and Bulgaria who beg on the streets have become a common part of the townscape in Sweden. While demanding situations in their home countries drive them abroad to earn their living, those who turn to begging still face challenges in their everyday lives. Additional knowledge is needed, from their perspective, about the occupational challenges of begging, as well as how they adapt to those challenges.

    Aim: To describe the occupational challenges and related adaptations of vulnerable EU citizens begging in Sweden.

    Methods: We used a descriptive qualitative design. Individual interviews with 20 Romanian participants were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis with a deductive and inductive approach.

    Results: Six categories of occupational adaptation responses were identified: Keeping the family tier intact despite distance; Dealing with shame and stress; Managing body and mind when begging despite the monotony; Living as cheaply as possible; Trying to get a night's sleep without drawing attention to oneself; and Seeking alternatives for earning their living.

    Conclusion: Everyday life, when begging abroad, is filled with occupational challenges requiring occupational adaptations, for better or for worse, to sustain basic human needs. To further understand the needs of this vulnerable and marginalised group in society, human rights discourses that go beyond the individual level are needed.

  • 37.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire among community-dwelling older adults2014In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 817-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the test–retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire.

    Design: Test–retest reliability study.

    Subjects: A total of 298 community-dwelling subjects between 75 and 90 years of age.

    Methods: The Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire was translated into Swedish. By personal interviews during home visits and two weeks later by telephone interviews the subjects were asked about their life-space mobility during the past four weeks, and how often and whether they were independent or needed assistance from another person or equipment to reach different life-space levels.

    Results: None of the four scoring methods showed significant difference between test sessions. The mean (SD) total scores were 65 (22) and 65 (23) out of the maximum possible score of 120 at the two sessions. High levels were found for independent, assisted, and maximal life-space at both sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients and weighted Kappa-values between 0.84–0.94 were found for the total score, the independent, and the assisted life-space levels, indicating good to excellent reliability. A lower Kappa-value was observed for the maximal life-space level, mainly owing to skewed distributions. The method error values showed that a change of 10 in the total score and a change of one level in any of the three life-space levels can be considered to indicate a real change in clinical practice.

    Conclusion: The Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire can be reliably used among community-dwelling older adults.

  • 38.
    Kammerlind, A-S
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire among community-dwelling older adults2014In: Age well: Challenges for individual and society, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mobility is a vitally important activity throughout life. Advanced age carries increased risk of experiencing decreased mobility, with associated activity limitations and participation restrictions in social events. The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), originally developed by Sawyer Baker and colleagues in the U.S.A., has been used to measure mobility in community dwelling older adults. The LSA includes six levels of life-space, ranging from the person's bedroom to places beyond the person's hometown. A total LSA score is obtained by multiplying the life-space level reached by a value for independence and a value for the frequency of transportations. Three additional measures of life-space levels can be calculated: the independent life-space level; the assistive life-space level; and the maximal life-space level. Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire. Methods: At two test sessions, two weeks apart, 298 community-dwelling subjects between 75 and 90 years of age were asked about their life-space mobility during the past four weeks, and how often and whether they were independent from another person or equipment to reach different life-space levels. Results: None of the four scoring methods showed significant differences between test sessions. The mean total scores were 65 out of the maximum possible score of 120 at both test sessions. High levels were also found for independent, assisted, and maximal life-space at both sessions. ICC coefficients and weighted Kappa values between 0.84-0.94 were found for the total score, the independent and the assisted life-space levels indicating good to excellent reliability. The method error values showed that a change of 10 in the total score and a change of one level in any of the three life-space levels can be considered to indicate a real change in clinical practice. Conclusion: The Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire can be reliably used among community-dwelling older adults.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Ellinor
    et al.
    Luleå kommun.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fahlström, Gunilla
    SBU.
    Bertilsson, Göran
    SBU.
    Brolund, Agneta
    SBU.
    Fundell, Sara
    SBU.
    Välfärdsteknik - Digitala verktyg som social stimulans för äldre personer med eller vid risk för psykisk ohälsa: En kartläggning av systematiska översikter2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte

    Syftet med SBU:s rapport är att kartlägga vetenskaplig kunskap samt vetenskapliga kunskapsluckor. Detta baseras på systematiska översikter som undersökt effekter, upplevelser eller erfarenheter av digitala verktyg som social stimulans för att minska eller förebygga psykisk ohälsa bland äldre personer. Vad tillför denna kartläggning? För äldre personer med eller vid risk för psykisk ohälsa finns det översikter som visar att utbildning i och användning av dator och internet kan minska ensamhet men evidensläget är svagt. Kunskapsluckor finns för domänerna livskvalitet, ADL-förmåga (Aktiviteter i det Dagliga Livet), kognition, självständighet samt användbarhet av tekniken.

    Bakgrund

    Välfärdsteknik inrymmer digitala verktyg som syftar till att bibehålla eller öka trygghet, aktivitet, delaktighet eller självständighet för en person som har eller löper förhöjd risk att få en funktionsnedsättning. Välfärdsteknik kan fungera som ett hjälpmedel för den enskilde och utgörs av medicintekniska produkter alternativt konsumentprodukter vilka kan köpas i öppna handeln. Välfärdsteknik antas kunna bidra till ett aktivt och hälsosamt åldrande, även för åldrandeprocesser som sker genom hela livet och ter sig olika för varje individ.

    Metod

    En systematisk kartläggning innebär att frågeställningen och domäner identifieras. Dessa ligger sedan till grund för en systematisk litteratursökning. Efter litteratursökningen identifieras, relevans- och kvalitetsbedöms systematiska översikter och slutligen sammanställs resultaten i de inkluderade systematiska översikterna. Kartläggningen inkluderar ingen kvalitetsbedömning av de studier som ingår i de systematiska översikterna. Denna kartläggning utgår från sju översikter av medelhög kvalitet från åren 2012 till 2017 och presenterar data från både kvantitativ och kvalitativ forskningsdesign. I kartläggningen görs ingen evidensgradering. Mer detaljerad information kring metod samt avgränsningar finns i rapporten.

    Huvudresultat

    I kartläggningen ingår sju systematiska översikter av medelhög kvalitet som visar på kunskap eller kunskapsluckor inom de identifierade domänerna.

  • 40.
    Sim, Angela
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Cordier, Reinie
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Kuzminski, Rebecca
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Viewpoints on what is important to maintain relationship satisfaction in couples raising a child with autism spectrum disorder2019In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 65, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Despite the challenges associated with raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), many couples maintain satisfying relationships. However, it is not clear which factors couples prioritise as most important to this positive adaptation. Methods This study used Q-methodology to explore the viewpoints on factors most important to maintaining relationship satisfaction from the perspective of those experiencing it. Data from 43 caregivers raising a child with ASD were analysed using by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results Two key viewpoints were identified: 1) Building effective communication through openness, honesty and conflict resolution, and 2) Building a strong partnership by sharing parenting responsibilities. Conclusion Couples should be supported to strengthen communication processes and work in partnership to raise their child with ASD through family-centred interventions aimed at promoting relationship satisfaction.

  • 41.
    Svärdh, Samantha
    et al.
    Lund University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Active and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Lund, Sweden.
    Löfqvist, Charlotte
    Lund University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Active and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Lund, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Schmidt, Steven
    Lund University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Active and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Lund, Sweden.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Lund University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Active and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Lund, Sweden.
    Attitudes, acceptance and use of everyday technologies – a generational perspective2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology is a fixed feature in today’s world, from smart phones to the everyday technology in our homes. Research is limited regarding perceptions of and attitudes to technology among people of different generations as related to the technological developments they have experienced during their lifetime, as well as their health. It is imperative that researchers focus on this topic in order to better meet the needs of older persons in their utilization of technology. This study is the first step in an ongoing research project concerning healthy ageing and technology from a broader sense, which takes a unique generational perspective. The study aims to develop new knowledge regarding perceptions, acceptance and usage amongst people of different generations as related to the technological developments they have experienced during their lifetimes. Data was collected through several focus group interviews with participants from three age groups (30-39, 50-59 and 70-79 year olds). This exploratory method was used to capture attitudes regarding technology through group discussions and dynamics. Interviews were analysed according to qualitative content analysis and then compared using NVivo software. Preliminary findings indicate that participants do not view non-digitalized items like kitchen appliances as technology. They problematize digital technology and its development, particularly concerning issues with privacy and integrity, as well as its effect on human relationships. However, most continue to use digital technology and even name their smartphone or computer as the most in their everyday life. Explicit desires for parallel pathways and individualized solutions nonetheless pervade. The 70-79ers had less trust in digital technology while the 30-39ers voiced issues regarding social pressures and inclusions; the 50-59ers had to consciously work to keep abreast of new technology. Digital technology engages and has a high usage among different generations; however, the human perspective needs to be further involved to fill basic needs of coming generations.

  • 42.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Johansson, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Descriptions of health by EU citizens begging abroad2017In: Society, health and vulnerability, E-ISSN 2002-1518, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1389586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor citizens from European Union (EU) member countries begging to support themselves are now common in affluent EU countries. Their lack of basic amenities, such as access to a shelter and sanitation is not in line with human rights and also implies a risk for health issues. Despite this, we know little about how these vulnerable EU citizens, themselves, perceive their health situation. The aim of this study was to explore vulnerable EU citizens’ descriptions of their health. Eight females and 12 males from Romania, 19–64 years of age, participated in individual interviews that included health issues. Qualitative content analysis was used, identifying the main category “Begging abroad and health - for better and for worse” together with two categories and five subcategories. It is concluded that EU citizens begging abroad risk poorer health as a consequence of their attempts to improve their situation, both their own health and that of their relatives. Therefore, they need access to affordable health care as this may decrease the need for unwanted travelling abroad to beg.

  • 43.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Q metodologi i arbetsterapi - ett nytt sätt att identifiera subjektiva synsätt2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Johansson, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupation and health abroad as described by EU citizens begging in Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Johansson, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Begging abroad in Sweden: An interview study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The occurrence of begging by poor people from other countries in the European Union (EU) is now common in Scandinavia. They have a challenging life, but there is little knowledge about their own perceptions of their stay abroad.

    Aim: To explore the experiences of EU citizens begging in Sweden.

    Material: A descriptive design was used. Data were gathered through individual interviews conducted in Romanian and translated into Swedish. These were analysed using conventional content analysis. Participants were 20 EU citizens aged 19?64 years with experience of begging in Sweden.

    Results: The identified main category, "A hard time abroad to improve one's life", contained four categories - "Endurance is required to make a living"; "Exposed to others' attitudes and kindness"; "Handling being away"; and "A better life is the driving force".

    Conclusions and significance: EU citizens who beg face occupational injustice, spending many hours in non-preferred activity of begging and with few leisure activities, although no generalizations can be drawn based on this study. The importance of a friendly attitude and environmental support when abroad was also shown. Since occupational justice is within the scope of occupational therapy, occupational therapists have the skills to contribute in collaboration with others.

  • 46.
    Widmark, Elin
    et al.
    County Council of Värmland, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupation according to adolescents: Daily occupations categorized based on adolescents’ experiences2019In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 470-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The categorizations of occupation commonly used in occupational science and therapy today lack empirical foundations for children and adolescents. Without common definition or conceptualization, the ability to understand and evaluate the impact of occupation on people’s lives is limited. Research in these areas has predominantly been conducted with adults and research about children and adolescents has mainly focused on specific occupations and/or diagnoses. The study aimed to identify experience-based categories of occupation from the perspective of adolescents. Through qualitative interviews with 10 participants aged 12-15, data were collected and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Eight experience-based categories were identified: experiencing change of time perception, experiencing enjoyment and satisfaction, experiencing challenge and competence, experiencing boredom and tediousness, experiencing deeper engagement, experiencing relaxation and recovery, experiencing need, necessity or neutrality, and experiencing self-identification. The categories cover a variety of experiences, and show connections to earlier research. The findings show a possible way of understanding adolescents’ experience of occupation, and contribute to earlier research with an adolescent perspective. Further research is needed to confirm their relevance within other groups and contexts and can be used in further exploration of conceptualization.

  • 47. Wretstrand, Anders
    et al.
    Svensson, Helena
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Older people and local public transit: Mobility effects of accessibility improvements in Sweden2009In: Journal of Transport and Land Use, ISSN 1938-7849, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 49-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several transportation factors concerning older and disabled people are under transition in Sweden at present. By the year 2010, the public transit system must be fully accessible for all passengers. The present survey studied older people, in order to assess the perceived travel opportunities. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of older citizens (75+) in three Swedish mid-sized municipalities. The general conclusions were that even though older people show appreciation of the existing travel opportunities, there was evidence for restricted mobility for some sub-groups of these older people, due to various perceived barriers. These groups have few optional modes, and despite various accessibility measures, special transportation services – the mandatory demand-responsive transport service – continues to provide crucial mobility. Hence, there is more to be done regarding accessibility and usability in public transit for older people. Further studies have to clarify reasons for bus travel cessation. Even larger efforts have to be put into accessibility improvements, in particular intermediate transit solutions in order to meet the regulations and policies.

  • 48.
    Štefanac, Siniša
    et al.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Society, Vienna, Austria and Medical university of Vienna, Austria.
    Grabovac, Igor
    Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Wheelchair Users’ Satisfaction with the Prescribed Wheelchairs and Wheelchair Services in Croatia2018In: Collegium Antropologicum, ISSN 0350-6134, E-ISSN 1848-9486, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors tried to determine the wheelchair users’ satisfaction with prescribed wheelchairs and wheelchair services in Croatia. An online survey was distributed among members of the Croatian Paraplegic and Tetraplegic Alliance. One hundred-four participants were included in the analyses using non-parametric statistics. Most participants were satisfied with wheelchair dimensions (n=84;81%), functionality (n=80;77%), easiness to use (n=81;78%), comfort (n=69;66%) and wheelchair parts adjustment (n=64;62%). Individuals satisfied with wheelchair characteristics were also more engaged in the activities of everyday living than participants who were not satisfied. Significant activity participation was found in the following activities: bathing/showering (χ2=7.02;df=1;p=0.017), transfers (χ2=8.49;df=1;p=0.01), bladder/bowel management (χ2=17.77;df=1;p<0.001), food preparation (χ2=8.34;df=1;p=0.004), eating (χ2=9.33;df=1;p=0.014) and doing household chores (χ2=13.28;df=1;p<0.001). Fifty-seven participants (54.8%) had received wheelchair assessment and were also predominantly satisfied with the assessment (n=51;90%), selection process (n=49;79%), equipment trial (n=24;80%), education/skills training (n=40;89%) and the fitting process (n=38;86%). Participants who received wheelchair assessment and skills training felt safer when using wheelchairs (χ2=6.13;df=1;p=0.013). Majority of the participants were unsure where to ask for second opinions regarding wheelchair assessment (n=80;77%) and where to seek wheelchair support groups (n=78;75%). Satisfaction with wheelchairs and wheelchair services leads to more involvement in the activities of everyday living and increases feelings of safety.

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