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  • 1. Barry, D.
    et al.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Caccamo, Marta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Past digital, post-digital2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Benyon, David
    et al.
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Blended Spaces and Cross-channel Ecosystems2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition, ACM Digital Library, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a contribution to creativity and codesign based on applying the theory of conceptual integration (also known as conceptual blending, or blending theory) to creative design and collaboration. Our approach is based on bringing the principles of conceptual blending and applying them to the creation of novel spaces, objects and services in creative industries. We couple this with the conceptualization of actor-driven cross-channel ecosystems as the extended digital / physical places where experiences occur.

  • 3.
    Benyon, David
    et al.
    Centre for Interaction Design, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    User experience in cross-channel ecosystems2017In: HCI 2017 - Digital make-believe: Proceedings of the 31st International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2017), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in information and communication technologies have left interaction design and human-computer interaction (HCI) with something of a conceptual gap. The distinction between physical and digital spaces is increasingly blurred. Cloud-based services have enabled a separation of information content from device so that content can be accessed and manipulated across multiple devices and locations. The user experience (UX) frequently needs to deal with activities that transition across physical and digital spaces and ecosystems of devices and services. Designers can no longer prescribe the journey or curate experiences simply as isolated interactions. Instead, UX must be consistently spread across touchpoints, channels, and device ecosystems. Our contribution to the development of UX, interaction design, and information architecture is to appeal to the notions of cross channel user experiences and blended spaces. Information architecture is the pervasive layer that underlies interactions that cross services, devices and blended physical and digital spaces. Information architecture is the structure within which the UX unfolds. From this perspective, we highlight the importance of creating meaningful places for experience and navigation through blended spaces.

  • 4.
    Burford, Sally
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Australia.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Cross-channel Information Architecture for a World Exposition2017In: International Journal of Information Management, ISSN 0268-4012, E-ISSN 1873-4707, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 547-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an investigation and assessment of the digital information, provided via multiple channels, for the 2015 World Exposition (Expo) in Milan. Using emerging theoretical constructs in cross-channel information architecture as a lens, the researchers examined aspects of the digital information ecology that supported the Exposition event. This study focused, firstly, on how well information and its structure maintain a coherence that is useful and meaningful to its target audience across various technologies and platforms. Secondly, it attended to the means and mechanisms for moving from one information artefact to another and it comments on the ease with which global audiences traversed the multiple channels that formed the information environment of Expo 2015.

  • 5.
    Hobbs, Jason
    et al.
    Research Centre Visual Identities in Art and Design, University of Johannesburg.
    Fenn, Terence
    Multimedia Department, University of Johannesburg.
    Resmini, Andrea
    University of Borås.
    Maturing a Practice2010In: Journal of Information Architecture, ISSN 1903-7260, E-ISSN 1903-7260, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 37-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of this paper position pratice-led research (PLR) as an effective agent in the transformation of the seemingly inherent and natural acts found in casual practice into the formal arrangement of accepted truths and regulated practices of a discipline for user experience design (UXD) and information architecture (IA) communities of practice. The paper does not intend to exhaustively define discourse analysis, discipline practice or pratice-led research per se, but rather to introduce practitioners and the fields of UX and IA at large to the basic concepts of PLR so as to begin establishing discussion and awareness.

  • 6. Lacerda, F.
    et al.
    Mamede, L. M.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    An information architecture framework for the Internet of Things2017In: Philosophy & Technology, ISSN 2210-5433, E-ISSN 2210-5441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Ethics, politics, and poetics of information architecture2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Ghost in the Shell: Navigation, meaning and place-making in information space2013In: Classification and visualization: interfaces to knowledge: Proceedings of the International UDC Seminar 24-25 October 2013, The Hague, The Netherlands / [ed] A. Slavic, A. Akdag Salah & S. Davies, Würzburg: Ergon-Verlag, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Space and place are two very different concepts: one, the base experience of embodiment, objective, impersonal, undifferentiated; the other, a way of being “there” that includes memories, experiences, emotions, and behaviours associated with a specific context. While space simply “is”, place is an unstable, transient construct. The author points out that spatial reasoning shapes the way we perceive and understand the world: we not only get around with a map and compass, but we “get out” of difficult predicaments. We also navigate the Web, or “go to Google”. What about places then? If our house is certainly a place, what about Facebook? With an average 25 hrs/week spent online in the EU, does our sense of place stretch out from homes and offices to include our mobile phones, tablets and digital alter-egos in a continuum that permeates every moment of our lives? Should it? And if so, how is this different from the Internet we have known so far? Following this line of thought the author looks into filmic and videogame language, literature, comics, pop references and Japanese anime. He uses a number of examples to explain the transition from digital to postdigital. He argues that the old approach of a literal representation of reality will be replaced with a continuum of abstract grammars which will play a key role in place-making and navigation in complex information environments.

  • 9.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Groundhogs in the Source Code2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Of old, narrative and storytelling were used to weave useful pieces of information into stories that could be handed down orally, generation after generation. These stories were often conceived in the form of quests, rhythmically built on redundancy and interlacement and laid out on a map.

    In the past hundred years, storytelling has progressively distanced itself from this model: mechanical reproduction of music, images, movement, and text has transformed the language of communication across these media and channels, turning seamless immersion into self-conscious reflection, physical struggles into psychological tensions, and traveling the world into traveling emotional landscapes.

    Organizing space to represent or visualize experiences is a fundamental human trait, so, in what is both a predictable but unexpected turn of events, the Web, mobile, and digital media have brought once again spatial thinking, journeys, and quests center stage. Navigable space can both represent physical spaces and the abstract information spaces of Facebook or Uber, but what kind of space are we talking about? Some 21st century version of MS Bob? Some glorified FPS?

    Using such examples as Bram Stoker’s Dracula, published in 1897, camp musical videos from the early 1980s, early 1990s videogames, and Hollywood movies, this talk argues that as digital and physical blend into unstable cross-channel experiences our conceptualizations shift towards direct manipulation and understanding of abstract navigational and place-making grammars, rather than towards literal, skeumorphic representations of the real.

  • 10. Resmini, Andrea
    Hundred and Ten2010In: UX Storytellers: Connecting the Dots / [ed] Jan Jursa, Stephen Köver, and Jutta Grünewald, Amazon Digital Services, Inc. , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Resmini, Andrea
    University of Bologna.
    Information Architecture Modeling for Historical and Juridical Manuscript Collections2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Les architectures d’information (Architectures of Information)2013In: Etudes de Communication, ISSN 2101-0366, no 41, p. 31-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper maintains that in the epistemological shift from postmodernism to pseudo-modernism, technological, economic, social, and cultural elements of change have thoroughly transformed the scenario in which information architecture operated in the late 1990s and have eroded its channel-specific connotation as a website-only, inductive activity, opening the field up to contributions coming from the theory and practice of design and systems thinking, architecture, cognitive science, cultural studies and new media. The paper argues, through a thorough discussions of causes and effects and selected examples taken from the practice, that contemporary information architecture can be thus framed as a fundamentally multi-disciplinary sense-making cultural construct concerned with the structural integrity of meaning in complex, information-based cross-channel ecosystems.

  • 13.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Luoghi ed ecosistemi: Vivere il post-digitale2015In: I media digitali e l’interazione uomo-macchina / [ed] Arcagni, S., Ariccia: Aracne editrice, 2015, p. 111-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Making Places2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Mapping Cross-channel Ecosystems2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Per una storia breve dell'architettura dell'informazione2013In: Problemi dell'informazione, ISSN 0390-5195, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Placemaking in Information Architecture2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Prufrock, Malbork, and Yorkshire Tea: a conversation on conversations2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Rapid cross-channel prototyping2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Rapid cross-channel prototyping2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Reframing Information Architecture2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information architecture has changed dramatically since the mid-1990s and earlier conceptions of the world and the internet being different and separate have given way to a much more complex scenario in the present day. In the post-digital world that we now inhabit the digital and the physical blend easily, and our activities and usage of information takes place through multiple contexts and via multiple devices and unstable, emergent choreographies.

     Information architecture now is steadily growing into a channel- or medium-aspecific multi-disciplinary framework, with contributions coming from architecture, urban planning, design and systems thinking, cognitive science, new media, anthropology. All these have been heavily reshaping the practice: conversations about labelling, websites, and hierarchies are replaced by conversations about sense-making, place-making, design, architecture, cross media, complexity, embodied cognition, and their application to the architecture of information spaces as places we live in in an increasingly large part of our lives.

    Via narratives, frameworks, references, approaches and case-studies this book explores these changes and offers a way to reconceptualize the shifting role and nature of information architecture where information permeates digital and physical space, users are producers, and products are increasingly becoming complex cross-channel or multi-channel services.

  • 22. Resmini, Andrea
    The Art and Craft of Being Elsewhere2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The Ethics and Politics of Information Architecture2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Three reminders2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When information bleeds everywhere and our digital and physical spaces become one and the same, how do we behave as designers and architects.

    When we think of the future, our imagination conjures images of magic-like interactions while holographic displays glow in shades of blue or green. These will be there in some form, but they will be tactics, not strategy. As much as city planning and architecture are strategic design for physical spaces, in the blended spaces of mature cross-channel experiences wheredigital and physical become one and the same, strategy will have you play ball with information architecture. Information bleeds everywhere and its ​architectures shape, for good or for bad, our conversations, ​our ​ethics​,​ and politics. Crowd control moves from the streets to Twitter. Mobbing gets mobile. Facebook campaigns displace votes and funds​ as we stroll along its invisible boulevards and squares.​​

    ​We have responsibilities, but what​ exactly? Adopting a spatial perspective over the information architecture of blended spaces and using examples spanning from the bewildering narratives of Calvino’s Invisible Cities​ to the deceptive linearity of the Prince of Persia games,  from the Panopticon to reality tv and the Darknet, this talk discusses challenges, opportunities​, and what is at stake when information architectures scale up to the house and the city to organize a space of endless possibilities, and control.

  • 25.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Benyon, David
    Napier University Edinburgh.
    Designing Cross-channel Ecosystems2016In: Proceedings of NordiCHI 16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Benyon, David
    Napier University Edinburgh.
    Public Transport Commuting as a Cross-channel Experience in Blended Space2016In: Proceedings of NordiCHI 16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Byström, Katriina
    Madsen, Dorte
    IA Growing Roots2009In: Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 1931-6550, E-ISSN 1550-8366, Vol. 35, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Carlsson, Bertil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Teaching systems - Getting future IT entrepreneurs to see the full picture2014In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information is going everywhere. It is bleeding out of the Internet and out of personal computers, and it is being embedded into the real world. Mobile devices, networked resources, and real-time systems are making our interactions with information constant and ubiquitous. Information is becoming pervasive, and products and services are becoming parts of larger systems, many of these emergent, complex information-based ecosystems where participants are co-producers and where relationships between elements, channels and touchpoints are messy and non-linear. Still, by and large, within the area of informatics and information systems we teach management and design as if they were linear processes where cause and effect are easily ascertained and a solution readily provided. Could we try something different? How would that work and what results could it produce in terms of both learning outcomes and student satisfaction? This paper details the approach we followed and the early results we achieved in introducing business and informatics students to entrepreneurship and innovation through a holistic approach in the 2-year Master in IT, Management and Innovation at Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), in Jönköping, Sweden.

  • 29.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Carlsson, Bertil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Teaching Systems: Getting future IT entrepreneurs to see the full picture2013In: RSD2: Emerging Contexts for Systemic Design: Relating Systems Thinking and Design 2013 Symposium Proceedings / [ed] Birger Sevaldsson, Peter Jones, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Irizarry, B.
    Rice, S.
    Surla, S.
    Instone, K.
    Mapping the domain: Fifth Academic / Practitioners Roundtable2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Lacerda, Flavia
    University of Brasilia.
    The Architecture of Cross-channel Ecosystems: From convergence to experience2016In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Management of Digital Ecosystems (MEDES16) / [ed] Richard Chbeir, 2016, p. 17-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Convergence has been quietly reshaping not just media consumption but also the way we interact with products and services. Read/write access through personal and ambient devices enables the creation of free-flowing, actor-defined experiences that connect physical and digital artifacts, people, and locations into information-based ecosystems that vastly exceed the boundaries of the media industry. All sorts of everyday activities, from traveling to education to healthcare, are affected. This paper details the ways convergence is conceptualized in media studies and within product and service realization; argues that while media studies offer more mature descriptive frameworks, design practices are ill served by them as they are descriptive and not generative frameworks; proposes a formulation of cross-channel experiences as an information-based design artifact and of cross-channel ecosystems design as a pragmatical, actionable approach for dealing with convergent experiences in everyday activities. 

  • 32.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Lindenfalk, B.
    The product, service, experience continuum: a re-assessment of strategic design practices for the postdigital2017In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Lindenfalk, Bertil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The Myth that is Service2016In: Service Design Geographies. Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Francesco Grani, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Rosati, Luca
    University for Foreigners in Perugia.
    A Brief History of Information Architecture2011In: Journal of Information Architecture, ISSN 1903-7260, E-ISSN 1903-7260, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Rosati, Luca
    Beyond Flatland: From product to ecosystem. A model for designing and analyzing multidimensional information spaces2011In: Media Mutations 3 - Ecosistemi Narrativi: spazi, strumenti, modelli, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36. Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Rosati, Luca
    Information Architecture for Ubiquitous Ecologies2009In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Management of Emergent Digital EcoSystems - ACM MEDES 09 (Lyon, October 2009), 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Rosati, Luca
    University for Foreigners of Perugia.
    Pervasive Information Architecture: Designing Cross-Channel User Experiences2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Rosati, Luca
    Semantic Retail: Towards a Cross-ContextInformation Architecture2008In: Knowledge organization, ISSN 0943-7444, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information architecture (IA) is an emerging discipline within the knowledge organization field that merges concepts and approaches from several different disciplines (librarianship and information science, classification theory, logic and philosophy, user experience, web design, psychology and ergonomics, industrial design): its goal is the structural design of shared information environments. We outline a unified model of information architecture for both digital and physical spaces, providing a conceptual framework for the design of cognitive and informational continuity between environments that allows users not to shift constantly between diverse, often colliding patterns (Bates 2002; Grossman 2006; Marchionini2004; Rosati 2007). We identified key concepts which act as cross-fields heuristics and which provide the foundations for our framework: in this paper we will illustrate these heuristics as they apply to the design process of a new kind of retail space that we call “semantic retail”. This is a new kind of physical space where knowledge organization principles are applied not only to proper informational content, but also to goods, services and paths (wayfinding).

  • 39. Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Rosati, Luca
    The Semantic Environment: Heuristics for a Cross-Context Human-Information Interaction Model2009In: The Engineering of Mixed Reality Systems / [ed] Emmanuel Dubois, Philip Gray, and Laurence Nigay, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40. Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Rosati, Luca
    Quintarelli, Emanuele
    The FaceTag Engine2009In: Browsing Architecture: Metadata and Beyond / [ed] Zambelli, M., A. Janowiak, and H. Neuckermans, Stuttgart: Fraunhofer IRB Verlag , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Resmini, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Tan, He
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Science and Informatics.
    Adlemo, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Computer Science and Informatics.
    #ViewFromTheOffice - Reconceptualizing the Workplace as an Information-based Ecosystem2016In: Proceedings of the 6th STS Conference on Socio-technical Ecosystems, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Tan, He
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Information Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Information Engineering.
    Adlemo, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Information Engineering.
    Workplace innovation in Swedish local organizations - technology aspect: BIS 2015 International Workshops, Poznań, Poland, June 24-26, 2015, Revised Papers2015In: Business Information Systems Workshops / [ed] Witold Abramowicz, 2015, Vol. 228, p. 139-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace innovation (WI) is important to provide betterwork opportunities and increase productivity. WI at the individual tasklevel concerns the structure of individual work tasks. A number of surveyshave been done that measured WI at the individual task level, howeverthey paid little attention to work environment, in particular to supportivetechnology. This paper presents the case study of WI in two Swedishorganisations with focus on the alignment of ICT and the individual worktasks. We carried out seven interviews of workers at dierent levels ofjob and in dierent sectors. The qualitative data analysis identied fourthemes: business processes, working roles, data sources, and technology.The analysis was facilitated by constructing BPMN (Business ProcessModel Notation) diagrams for the identied business processes. We discoveredthat the supportive technology in the organisations is adequatebut downright traditional. We argue that technology is an important factorand enabler for WI. Finally, we present an architectural model thatprovides a direction for future work on WI taking ICT as the basis.

  • 43.
    Tonkin, Emma
    et al.
    UKOLN.
    Corrado, Edward M.
    The College of New Jersey.
    Moulaison, H. L.
    Rutgers University.
    Kipp, M. E. I.
    College of Information and Computer Science, Long Island University.
    Resmini, Andrea
    CIRSFID, Università di Bologna.
    Pfeiffer, H. D.
    New Mexico State University.
    Zhang, Q.
    College of Information and Computer Science, Long Island University.
    Collaborative and Social Tagging Networks2008In: Ariadne, ISSN 1361-3197, E-ISSN 1361-3200, no 54Article in journal (Refereed)
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