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  • 1.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Market innovation in the transport and heavy vehicle market2015In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual NOFOMA-Conference, Molde, 3-5 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to generate a greater understanding of the interrelatedness of new business models in the truck market and developments in the road transport sector.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on a three year research project in cooperation with a European heavy vehicle manufacturer, we present short case descriptions showing some of the main developments in the European trucking and transport markets. 

    Findings

    New business models emerge both in the heavy vehicle and transportation markets, in complex ways involving multiple actors.  The impetus for the models can come from several direction but the final impact must be negotiated and cannot be planned by a single actor.

    Research limitations/implications

    The research looks at a selection of cases and business models to demonstrate changes and the relations between the markets, and does not claim to be exhaustive in terms of the different business models in the European market. 

    Practical implications

    There is a distinct trend to greater specialization and the need for innovation to survive given the strong pressures in the commoditized transport market. Our findings show conflicting trends in terms of social implications, with improved ecological impact but the risk of worse conditions for driver. 

    Original/value

    The paper considers the development of new business models and implications on the market from the point of view of the firms actually using the business models.  This shows how different business models can co-exist and involve different types of rationalities.

  • 2.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    From product through service and solution to performance: Value propositions, interaction patterns and capabilities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper explores differences in inter- and intra-organizational interaction patterns depending on the nature of customer value propositions. It also discusses capabilities related to these value propositions.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – We perform a case study of the evolving value propositions of a Swedish truck manufacturer. Interviews are conducted with key representatives of the manufacturer, dealers, customers, and customers’ customers. We draw on literature in the business marketing and purchasing area.

    Findings – The manufacturer makes four types of value propositions (cf. Anderson et al., 2006) associated with different interaction patterns. (1) A first type involves a basic product, i.e. a vehicle along with basic services, such as a warranty. The sales process represents a short dealer-customer negotiation to determine truck customization and price and is a general solution to a general problem. Interaction remains simple throughout the truck’s operating cycle; feedback to the product development and manufacturing function comes mainly from the manufacturer’s service organization. (2) A second type of value proposition involves optional add-on services that support the use of the product, such as repairs and maintenance, tire replacement, financing, and insurance. Although each service component is standardized, the package of services is selected by the buyer based on its needs. Interaction in regard to purchase and use is therefore more complex and ongoing. (3) In a third type, the customer buys truck(s) and services as an integrated solution to its specific sourcing problem. This requires a deeper understanding of how the customer uses trucks. Such an analysis relies on interaction between the manufacturer’s sales representatives and various functions at the customer. As the truck is used, interaction between manufacturer and customer is continuous. E.g., driving patterns can be analyzed and driving training be tailored to the needs of the customer; service needs are monitored, etc. (4) A fourth type involves not only a solution to a sourcing problem, but a co-created solution to support the customer’s value-creation. The customer buys solution performance that supports its revenue generation, not just its efforts to reduce costs. A deep understanding of the customer’s business is required with a focus on how the customer uses trucks to support its customers’ value creation. As payment is based on uptime (or other form of utilization), knowledge of truck usage is also needed by the manufacturer to determine price per km and to set service level agreement. Interaction is continuous and complex, with the manufacturer’s service organization taking over part of fleet management from the customer. These value propositions exist simultaneously and place very different demands on capabilities, which increase in number and particularity with more complex value propositions.

    Originality/value – We empirically identify four distinct value propositions that rely on different inter- and intra-organizational interaction patterns and require different capabilities.

  • 3.
    Hertz, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Agndal, Henrik
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Chalmers University of Technology and Supply Chain Management and Jönköping International Business School.
    The development of extended service models through business relationships: A Swedish trucking industry study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we ask how an extended service model is developed over time in the relationship between buyer and seller in the trucking industry.  Extended service models following a service-dominant logic rather than a product-dominant logic are becoming increasingly important in many industries.  Here we report on the initial stages of a large study on the use and development of extended service models in the Swedish market for trucks.  We see considerable promise in studying the development of the concept over time in the interaction between customer and provider. 

  • 4.
    Ober, Stefan A.
    et al.
    Ministry of Defence, Army Training Command, Utrecht.
    Hofenk, Dianne J.B.
    Wageningen University.
    Semeijn, Janjaap
    Open Universiteit, School of Management, Heerlen.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Examining logistics triads: The effect of 3PL environmental sustainability on end customer satisfaction2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies are increasingly held responsible for the sustainability of their own operations as well as their suppliers’ operations. This study aims to investigate the effects of 3PL provider sustainability in triadic relationships. Specifically, the authors study the effects of 3PL provider sustainability and delivery costs on end customer satisfaction with the selling company. In addition, the mediating role of customer-company congruence is examined. Building on logistics and marketing literature, the authors develop a conceptual model, which they empirically test by means of a scenario-based experiment among 192 end customers. The findings support the hypothesized model: 3PL provider sustainability is positively related to end customer satisfaction with the selling company, whereas delivery costs are negatively related to end customer satisfaction with the seller. The effect of 3PL provider sustainability on end customer satisfaction with the seller is partially mediated by customer-company congruence. The results suggest that companies outsourcing their logistics services to 3PL providers should, in addition to costs, use sustainability as a selection criterion and performance indicator in their relationships with 3PL providers.

  • 5.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Sustainable business model in transportation - Experience from Swedish and Australian long-haulage trucking industry2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Businesses nowadays are pressured to operate in a more sustainable way and consider economic as well as environmental and social logics behind their business practices in order to create value for their stakeholders. In consequence, a sustainable business model has been implemented in both goods and service industries and offers a framework for system level innovation for sustainability though the whole supply chain management (Bocken & Short, 2015; Hogevold, Svensson & Padin, 2015).In the transportation industry, the focus on sustainability and new business models is also increasing (Dekker et al, 2012). This industry has by far one of the most negative environmental impacts and road transportation is the biggest concern of all transport modes (Jaegler and Condran, 2014). Trucks are remaining to dominate in the long-haulage deliveries in many countries hence understanding sustainable business models in this industry is important both for practice and academia. Also, with the customer pressure, global political agenda and changing systems, the companies should consider addressing sustainability challenges combining different business actors and stakeholders in joint value-adding offerings (Seuring Hahn & Gold, 2013).With the present focus of high-end heavy-vehicle manufacturers to provide sustainable solutions to their customers the question arises: what do they mean by this? The purpose of this study is to explore new business models and interactions in transport network, focusing on trucking industry (specifically on long-haulage) with the focus on emerging sustainability issues. Since long-haulage trucks are the big part of transportation system, the focus is on truck manufacturers, dealers and truck buyers. The empirical base for this study is multiple case study of main truck manufacturers and their downstream network in Sweden and Australia. The research question of this study is: what is a sustainable business model in long-haulage transport supply chains? What are the main components in the business model that can be called sustainable? The study is designed as a qualitative study with the goal to collect the data through personal interviews (Myers, 2009).This paper consists of theoretical discussion on sustainable business models with the focus on the industrial networks. The theoretical lens chosen is social network theory and stakeholder theory. The methods section includes the description of the study performed. The empirical part consists of data extracted from the interviews with three heavy-vehicle manufacturers, dealers and transport customers. The analysis part and conclusions explain the model for sustainable business model in long-haulage transport supply chains. The paper is finalized with managerialand theoretical contributions and directions for future research.

  • 6.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Challenges and Conflicts in Sustainable Supply Chain Management: Evidence from the Heavy Vehicle Industry2014In: Supply Chain Forum: an International Journal, ISSN 1625-8312, E-ISSN 1624-6039, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding and explore the challenges and conflicts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) through empirical examples from the heavy vehicle industry in Sweden and China. An exploratory study of the case company’s supply chains in two countries is conducted for this paper. The major components of the empirical data are interviews with the company´s representatives and its downstream supply chain members in Sweden and China, as well as workshops with the logistics industry’s representatives in China. The findings show that the firms perceive the challenges on the regulatory and organisational levels. The conflicts can be found between several stakeholder groups, the main focus seems to be on environmental and economic aspects. Life-cycle solution for the vehicles’ utilisation is valuable but there are challenges to employing it, especially in the Chinese context. The results show that intensified international collaboration on environment and traffic safety can help tackle challenges and ease the conflicts in sustainable supply chain management.

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  • nn-NO
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