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  • 1. Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Jakobsson, Enar
    Barnens hälsa kräver mer än frånvaro av sjukdom2005In: Psykologtidningen, ISSN 0280-9702, no 8, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Hellnäs, Petra
    Stefansson, Maria
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    I can play! Young children's perceptions of health2006In: Pediatric Rehabilitation, ISSN 1363-8491, E-ISSN 1464-5270, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 275-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health is today viewed as a multi-dimensional concept partly conceptualized independent from not being ill. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of how young children perceive health. Interviews were conducted with 68 children (4–5 years), within their pre-school setting, with the help of a semi-structured interview guide. A multi-dimensional perspective represented by the health dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was used in a manifest deductive content analysis. The children's statements were categorized and placed under one of the four health dimensions, body, activity, participation and environment. A latent content analysis was applied to identify underlying themes in the manifest categories. The results revealed that young children perceive health as a multi-dimensional construct, largely related to being engaged, i.e. to be able to perform wanted activities and participate in a supportive every-day context. This implies that improvements of child engagement should be emphasized in health promotion and to a greater extent be the central focus of health interventions for young children

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Special Education.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola.
    Vilka stödinsatser främjar uppfyllelse av kunskapsmål för elever i svårigheter? – en syntes av meta-analyser2015In: Tre forskningsöversikter inom området specialpedagogik/inkludering / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2015, p. 1-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This review is a synthesis of results from meta-analyses. Meta-analyses are reviews in which certain statistical methods are used to calculate effect sizes based on intervention studies. Mainly, effect sizes are used to synthesize results from experimental studies focusing on similar research questions. The aim of this review was to compile research about interventions promoting achievement goals of students in need of special support. More specifically we have studied what pedagogical methods relate to achievement goals for this group of students. These methods are defined as general pedagogical interventions as well as subject-specific pedagogical methods within the subjects reading and writing and mathematics.

  • 4.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s behavior difficulties and staff-implemented special support in Swedish preschools: Emotional and behavioral difficultiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Health, Care, and Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Special support for behavior difficulties and engagement in Swedish preschools2018In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum stipulates that all children independent of support needs should attend mainstream preschool groups, with equal opportunities for learning and engagement. Preschool teachers are responsible for paying attention to children in need of special support to achieve this. How support is provided for children in need of special support due to behavior difficulties in Swedish preschools varies, however. Some children, often formally identified as in need of special support, are supported by preschool staff supervised by external services. Other children receive support initiated and implemented by preschool staff, without supervision from external services. A further number of children receive no support for behavior difficulties, on top of what is provided to all children. This study investigated associations between support format (i.e. supervised support, staff-initiated support or no additional support), support content (i.e. implementation of support), behavior difficulties, socio-demographics and engagement. A mixed methods approach was used with a sample of 232 preschool children 15 to 71 months with assessed behavior difficulties. Preschool staff reported on the children's engagement, behavior difficulties, socio-demographics and support provision. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the probability of children receiving either support format. Content analysis was used to categorize the support content, reported by preschool staff through open-ended questions. Point-biserial correlations were used to test associations between support content, behavior, socio-demographics and engagement. All children receiving supervised support for behavior difficulties were formally identified by external services as in need of special support. Supervised support was also more common if children disturbed the free play in the preschool group, with the most frequent support being collaboration with external teams. Staff-initiated support was most commonly given to children with high engagement, and for children who are not early second language learners. These children were most frequently supported by staff paying attention to negative behavior. Children who were not perceived as a burden to the group were less likely to receive any form of additional support. Ways of managing the preschool group seem to guide support strategies for children with behavior difficulties, rather than child-focused strategies emphasizing engagement in everyday activities.

  • 6.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Klang, Nina
    Lillvist, Anne
    The international classification of functioning, disability and health and the version for children and youth as a tool in child habilitation/early childhood intervention: feasibility and usefulness as a common language and frame of reference for practice2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early childhood intervention and habilitation services for children with disabilities operate on an interdisciplinary basis. It requires a common language between professionals, and a shared framework for intervention goals and intervention implementation. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the version for children and youth (ICF-CY) may serve as this common framework and language. This overview of studies implemented by our research group is based on three research questions: Do the ICF-CY conceptual model have a valid content and is it logically coherent when investigated empirically? Is the ICF-CY classification useful for documenting child characteristics in services? What difficulties and benefits are related to using ICF-CY model as a basis for intervention when it is implemented in services? A series of studies, undertaken by the CHILD researchers are analysed. The analysis is based on data sets from published studies or master theses. Results and conclusion show that the ICF-CY has a useful content and is logically coherent on model level. Professionals find it useful for documenting children's body functions and activities. Guidelines for separating activity and participation are needed. ICF-CY is a complex classification, implementing it in services is a long-term project.

  • 7.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens Universitet.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination.2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiog- raphers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

    The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

    Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

    During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

    Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories e “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radio- graphic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

    The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

  • 8.
    Castro, Susana
    et al.
    School of Education, University of Roehampton, London, UK.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The relationship between classroom quality-related variables and engagement levels in Swedish preschool classrooms: a longitudinal study2017In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 122-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child engagement has been defined as active participation in classroom routines, appropriate interactions with the environment and it also predicts academic achievement. Therefore, it is necessary to identify predictors of engagement over time. Moreover, cross-cultural data is needed to provide a global picture of the quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) across countries. This study aims to describe the quality of Swedish preschool classrooms and its relationship with students’ engagement over time. Data was collected from 165 preschool teachers in 55 preschool units in Sweden. Results show that all classroom-related variables (Emotional Support, Instructional Support and Classroom Organisation) have increased levels over time, while engagement remained stable. Three groups of preschool classroom units were identified with similar patterns of classroom quality over time (higher emotional support and lower instructional practice) and similar differences in level. Emotional Support was found to be the best predictor of student engagement over time.

  • 9.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Department of Educational Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ideas about occupational roles and inclusive practices among special needs educators and support teachers in Sweden2017In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 490-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special needs educators (SNEs) and their counterparts are expected to play a significant role in schools’ work towards inclusive practices. Studies do, however, indicate a rather diversified picture regarding the occupational groups assigned to work with special support and their workroles, within and between different countries. In Sweden, one can differentiate between two such occupational groups, SNEs with qualifications in special educational needs at advanced level and support teachers (SuTs) with varying teacher education and education in special educational needs. The aims of this article are to investigate the occurrence of SNEs and SuTs within the compulsory school system in 10 municipalities in Sweden and the occupational roles of those SNEs and SuTs in relation to the inclusion agenda. A questionnaire was sent out in 2012 to all SNEs and SuTs in 10 municipalities (n = 511, response rate 61.6%). Main results indicate that: (a) there is wide variation between municipalities regarding the extent to which SNEs or SuTs are assigned to work with special support; (b) the characteristics of the occupational role of SNEs are more in line with inclusive practices than those of the role of SuTs; (c) there is consensus between the two occupational groups regarding what they think should characterize the occupational role of SNEs; (d) SNEs consider, more than do the SuTs themselves, that the role of SuTs should be more in line with that of a “traditional special-education teacher”. Results are discussed in relation to Thomas Skrtic’s theoretical accounts of inclusive education and Andrew Abbott’s notion of jurisdictional control.

  • 10.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Patterns of time processing ability in children with and without developmental disabilities2010In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 250-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2019In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 12.
    Niia, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Ellinor, Brunnberg
    Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Student participation and parental involvement in relation to academic achievement2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 297-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely related to activity and academic performance. Despite these differences, teachers and students are in close agreement regarding activities of a social nature. Teachers' and parents' ratings of parents' involvement in school demonstrate a higher agreement, but also correlate negatively with the academic achievement of the student. This is likely because communication is more frequent with parents of underachieving students than students demonstrating high academic performance. The partly inconsistent results in previous research regarding the relation between participation and academic achievement can here be explained by the choice of raters, as this connection only exists in ratings carried out by teachers.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for AAC, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hvit, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s voices – Differentiating a child perspective from a child’s perspective2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective based on the problem being investigated.

    Methods: Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

    Results: The child's perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective in conjunction with the need to know children's opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult's view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children's capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children's opinions.

    Conclusion: The examples provided indicate that children's opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

  • 14.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University.
    Engagement and emergent literacy practices in Swedish preschools2015In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 619-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's ability to express thoughts, ideas, and needs is vital to their full participation in a democratic society. In the preschool environment, multiple opportunities to engage in emergent literacy practices may stimulate this ability. The study used an ecological development approach to investigate the language environment in Swedish preschools, focusing on the relationships among seven classroom quality dimensions. Children's engagement was measured by observing their active participation in emergent literacy practices. The results showed that positive climate, instructional learning formats and language modeling were the most significant contributors to engagement in emergent literacy practices. To conclude, children's engagement in emergent literacy practices seems to benefit from a positive climate and needs and uses instructional discussions and activities in the everyday situations in preschool.

  • 15.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Mälardalens Högskola.
    Interaction processes as a mediating factor between children's externalized behaviour difficulties and engagement in preschool2016In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, no 10, p. 1649-1663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18–71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated that behaviour difficulties and engagement may occur simultaneously. Hyperactivity had a direct negative influence on engagement, which was not the case with conduct problems. Teachers’ responsiveness as well as positive interactions with peers had an indirect influence on the relationship between hyperactivity and engagement. Responsive staff and positive interactions within the child group seem to contribute to children's engagement despite hyperactivity. Children's engagement, as well as special support to stimulate engagement in preschool, is discussed.

  • 16.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Axelsson, A.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Danielsson, H.
    Social interactions - predictor of children’s engagement and hyperactivity in preschoolManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Health Care Sciences Postgraduate School, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet Neuropediatric Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital Q2:07, Solna, Sweden.
    Cultural validity of the Children's assessment of participation and enjoyment/Preferences for activities of children (CAPE/PAC)2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 428-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate whether the activity items of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC) were relevant for Swedish children.

    Subjects: A total of 337 typically developed children aged 6–17 years old.

    Methods: The CAPE/PAC was translated into Swedish in accordance with accepted translation procedures. By means of 14 group interviews with children with and without disabilities aged 6–15 years old and parents, available leisure activities were listed. These were matched to the items in the CAPE/PAC. Sixteen new potential activities were added and tested on 337 typical developed children from different regions of Sweden. A cutoff level of activities performed by >10% was set to identify relevant activities. Differences between the original and a proposed Swedish version were analysed using paired-samples t-tests of standardized mean scores.

    Results: Three new activity items were included, for 10 items new activity examples were added, and three not relevant items were excluded. In the Swedish version the outcome of standardized mean diversity score was significantly higher compared with the outcome of the original version. Conclusions:When using instruments in new contexts, it is not enough simply to translate; validation of the item relevance to the new context is essential.

  • 18.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bult, Maureen
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Nyquist, Anna
    Norwegian School of Sport Science, Department of Physical Education and Beitostølen Healthsport Centre, Beitostølen, Norway.
    Ketelaar, Marie
    Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat-Network for Childhood Disability Research in the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Jahnsen, Ranvig
    Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neuroscience for children, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 369-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6–17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation.

    Results: Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender.

    Conclusion: Differences in school- and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most.

  • 19.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Differences in patterns of participation in leisure activities in Swedish children with and without disabilities2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare participation in leisure activities between Swedish children with and without disabilities and to examine whether age, gender, presence of disabilities, and mother’ seducational level influence participation.

    Method: A Swedish version of the Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment was used to study the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of participation in leisure activities of children aged 6 to 17 years. Fifty-five of the children had disabilities and 337 of the children did not have disabilities. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to explore the impact of age, gender, mother’s level of education, and disability on the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of leisure activities. At-test for independent samples was used to compare the diversity and intensity of participation between children withand without disabilities.

    Results: The multiple regression analysis explained 4–36% of the variance of diversity, intensity, and enjoyment. Children with disabilities participated with higher diversity, but with less intensity, than children without disabilities. Younger children had higher levels of enjoyment.

    Conclusions: Children with disabilities participated in several different activities, but the presence of a disability was associated with lower intensity ofparticipation. The low explanatory value of the investigated variables indicates that the combined effect of several variables needs to be taken into consideration when designing participation interventions.

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