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  • 1.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Kombination av ledningsfilosofier bäst2007In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, Vol. 2, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Kvalitet ger cost cutting. Ericssons erfarenheter2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Quality-driven logistics2007Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of this thesis is to describe and explain how different quality management philosophies can be combined in the supply/demand chain, in order to contribute to its resilience. The analysis is both quantitative and qualitative, based on theory and literature related to TQM, Lean, Agile and Six Sigma, one literature study and three case studies that were performed in companies. The studies are related to four research questions and are presented in four papers. The first research question focuses on similarities and differences between the quality management concepts TQM, Lean and Six Sigma. The findings were that TQM, Six Sigma and Lean have many similarities, but they differ in some areas. For examples Lean addresses process flow and waste, whereas Six Sigma addresses variation and design. The conclusion is that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine these three concepts, as they are complementary. Two case studies and a literature survey supported the findings. The second research question focuses on outcomes in a logistics process if using quality management. The findings were that the quality management approach leads to risks being mitigated, managed and monitored and ensures a more effective, robust and flexible process, very much in line with the Agility philosophy. Solutions for quicker response to customers have also been introduced. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies. The third research question focuses on how prepared the transport- and logistics-oriented companies are for the application of quality concepts and quality management philosophy. The findings were that they can be described as being TQM-oriented. The companies do not consider Lean and Six Sigma to be future trends. Focus is on the customer, while they do not focus on variations or removing waste. The findings were supported by a case study in 24 companies. The fourth research question focuses on how quality concepts can contribute to risk control and resilience in an organisation. A combined Lean/Six Sigma approach by using Six Sigma framework and the last phase, Perfection, in the Lean concept, implies that the companies’ resilience, due to their strengthened ability to handle variability, risk management and agility, was improved. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Quality-driven logistics today and tomorrow2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Roy
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Resiliens i försörjningskedjan2014In: Organisatorisk resiliens: vad är det som gör företag och organisationer uthålligt livskraftiga? / [ed] Stefan Tengblad & Margareta Oudhuis, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, p. 199-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Supply chain resilience through quality management2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The length and complexity of the supply chain tend to increase, rather than diminish, thereby making the supply chain riskier and less predictable and, hence, more vulnerable. At the same time, customers are becoming increasingly demanding. The challenge to businesses today is to create a resilient supply chain in order to manage and mitigate risk and vulnerability. The purpose of the thesis is to explore, describe and develop the use of a combined quality management philosophy in logistics processes in order to improve supply chain resilience. The findings are supported by six studies, which are presented here in six papers. The studies show that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine quality management philosophies, as they are complementary to one another. TQM places its strongest emphasis on the commitment and involvement of all employees. Lean is a discipline that focuses on process speed and removal of waste in order to increase customer value. Six Sigma benefits from an added focus on variability and design of products/services and processes. It has been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy makes the logistics processes more reliable, flexible, agile and robust while reducing cost. The companies’ risk awareness has increased and their risk management has been improved, thanks to the Six Sigma training programmes and philosophy. Using a combined quality management philosophy, the speed of production could be increased, and the responsiveness and flexibility could be improved, which means quicker response to changes. It has also been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy improves the companies’ resilience, due to their increased agility and strengthened ability to handle variability and risk management. Quality management tools can be very effective in the companies’ efforts to control supply chain risk and to identify risk sources of variation, even outside the focal company. In Six Sigma projects, the root cause of variation is often found outside the focal companies, which requires more collaboration in the supply chain. However, if the companies that use a combined quality management philosophy intend to become more resilient, they must involve suppliers and customers more in their own processes and design products/services and processes together. Collaboration with the suppliers and customers and the notion of how to extend a combined quality management philosophy outside the focal company are of importance in order to make the whole supply chain resilient. This could lead to a problem, especially since the conditions for transport and logistics in regards to the application of quality methods and tools represent a large area, unexploited by the companies. On the other hand, Six Sigma has standardised training courses, and it has been demonstrated how a Six Sigma framework can enable collaboration across companies’ boundaries in the supply chain, with the use of Six Sigma training and the DMAIC-roadmap as a common platform. Even if a combined quality management philosophy is effective and efficient, the companies must re-invest in additional methods, tools and strategies to make the entire supply chain resilient. It could be this re-investment in risk prevention and mitigation solutions that enables faster process responsiveness, the establishment of a risk management culture by creating common values, culture and rules in the supply chain and the use of logistics strategies and methods.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Överträffa kundernas förväntningar2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Alm, Håkan
    Asian Institute of Technology.
    Campus Thailand – a new strategy to meet new demands2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early part of the new millennium the student application rate has declined in the field of engineering. At the same time the demand from companies has changed to more general degrees that also include international experience. As the world becomes evermore internationalized, companies need employees who can operate in the international market with insights into business culture across the globe with knowledge of sustainable development. All this was an enabler to start to think “out of the box” in order to design a new program. The name ofthe program is ‘International Business Engineering’, a three-year bachelor’s program, 180 ECTS. It includes main subjects such as business, quality, logistics, operations research and management. A mix that provides overall knowledge, catering to the needs in international careers. The program embraces a multi-national and multi-cultural outlook and an education that enables work for a sustainable development, integrated in the global economy. It starts with three semesters in Sweden. The fourth semester is located to Campus Thailand and the last semester gives the students an opportunity to do their thesis work in a number of countries around the world. It commenced in 2009 with 40 students, only half of which were Swedish. All courses are given in English by teachers from Sweden, Thailand, Cuba, South Africa etc. This first year there were 5 000 applicants from 80 countries. The courses often include group work, which also gives the students insights into and knowledge of cultural differences.

    Campus Thailand is located at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT). A semester there makes the students part of a multi-cultural student environment. AIT has become a leading regional institution and is working towards technological and sustainable development in Asia and the area around the Pacific. CSR Asia is involved at AIT, teaching the students and performing field trips for the students in the South Asian region, including Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand and more. Around 70 percent of all students and staff are international withover 40 nationalities represented, giving important international contacts for the future. Cooperation with the Thai-Swedish Chamber of Commerce and its many member companies enables the students to carry out internships with global companies such as SAS, ABB, Volvo, Electrolux and Husqvarna. To date (2013), 70 students have studied in Thailand and over 40 students have performed an internship in companies in Bangkok. From the first batch of students, two are now employed in Bangkok. Currently, the program has ten full-paying fee students.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Bridi, Eduardo
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Baez, Yinef Pardillo
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, San Buenaventura University, Cali, Colombia.
    Maldonado, Mauricio Uriona
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Forcellini, Fernando Antônio
    Department of Production Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Moraes, Fabio Cesar
    Municipality of São José, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Improvement in public administration services: a case of business registration process[Poboljšanje usluga javne uprave: Studija slucaja za registracije preduzeca]2018In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 109-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work addresses the process of opening enterprises (grant of license) in a municipality. The purpose is to perform the identification, analysis and redesign of the process of granting permits to private companies, then making a proposal for improvement. The chosen method was a case study, using a qualitative approach according to the BPM methodology to respond: how to improve and accelerate the grant of a license? As a result, the proposed model used the best practices for business registration to reduce the time to 70%, and using half of the involved sectors. The conclusion is that it is possible to reduce bureaucracy and increase the efficiency of public administration with the applied methodology. 

  • 10.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Torstensson, H.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Revised guidelines on intermodal transfer techniques needs and technologies2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliverable 2.2 of the Intermode-TRANS project presents a first version of guidelines on intermodal transfer techniques needs and technologies. The guidelines are based on an initial investigation of joint European projects and other sources, as well as on discussions with researchers and stakeholders, the results of which were presented in Deliverable 2.1 - State of art on intermodal transfer techniques. A series of workshops with stakeholders and experts in intermodal transport and transshipment facilities and techniques brought a number of additional identified problems and research needs,. Principally, the workshops confirmed the findings of D2.1, which therefore form the core also of these guidelines. The guidelines include a summary of more than 24 joint European research projects, addressing intermodality, where several results have not yet become exploited. Identified areas of development and recommendations for further work address a.o. technology for transshipment, including container standards and handling, harmonization of rail infrastructure and rail and road vehicles, marketing and knowledge management in the field, information systems for logistics support, training and awareness-raising, the cost vs. benefit structure, and a number of actions of a political and organizational nature.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University College of Borås.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    School of Engineering, University College of Borås.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    School of Engineering, University College of Borås.
    Similarities and differences between TQM, six sigma and lean2006In: TQM Magazine, ISSN 0954-478X, E-ISSN 1758-6887, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 282-296Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – During the last decades, different quality management concepts, including total quality management (TQM), six sigma and lean, have been applied by many different organisations. Although much important work has been documented regarding TQM, six sigma and lean, a number of questions remain concerning the applicability of these concepts in various organisations and contexts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to describe the similarities and differences between the concepts, including an evaluation and criticism of each concept.

    Design/methodology/approach – Within a case study, a literature review and face‐to‐face interviews in typical TQM, six sigma and lean organisations have been carried out.

    Findings – While TQM, six sigma and lean have many similarities, especially concerning origin, methodologies, tools and effects, they differ in some areas, in particular concerning the main theory, approach and the main criticism. The lean concept is slightly different from TQM and six sigma. However, there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine these three concepts, as they are complementary. Six sigma and lean are excellent road‐maps, which could be used one by one or combined, together with the values in TQM.

    Originality/value – The paper provides guidance to organisations regarding the applicability and properties of quality concepts. Organisations need to work continuously with customer‐orientated activities in order to survive; irrespective of how these activities are labelled. The paper will also serve as a basis for further research in this area, focusing on practical experience of these concepts.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Hammerberg, P.
    A six sigma framework enabling collaboration across company boundaries in supply chain2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean implementation in geriatric care in a municipal: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S4-87-S4-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented at geriatric care in a municipal department in Sweden, focusing on the experiences and challenges of the employees, together with the strengths and weaknesses of the lean philosophy.

    Design/methodology/approach: The primary method used was a case study with interviews and observations on spot, in combination with a literature study. All with the intention of defining and describing lean, its value, and how organizations generally apply lean.

    Findings: All sources of information have shown that there are many advantages with lean such as better communication and a better-organized workplace. In addition, lean tools help to eliminate non-value adding activities (waste). However, implementations also bring about issues and challenges such as the difficulty of creating a long lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups and the decreasing demand for lean from the executives have been the main issues within the geriatric care. The next step might be to create a common organizational culture, which is permeated with continuous improvements, focusing on value-adding activities for the residents and others stakeholders.

    Originality/value: Very few studies have addressed lean implementation in geriatric care as well as in a municipal department.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lean implementation in the geriatric care sector in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 56-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented in the geriatric care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The research focuses on implementation experiences and challenges encountered. The research method used is a case study using interviews and observations for data collection. The findings indicate that there are many advantages of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as better communication, organisation and workflow. The lean implementation worked as an eye-opener and created a situation, where the employees realised a great deal of waste in the daily operations. In addition, lean tools helped to reduce the waste. The findings also indicate that there are some challenges of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as the difficulty to create long-lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups, decreasing interest from senior management and lack of a holistic view were the main issues in the case organisation.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Business Unit Networks, Microwave and Access Supply, Ericsson, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Department of Industrial Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 904-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elaborate, how the use of a joint-use strategy of Lean and Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, and agility. Telecom manufacturing has been under tremendous change after dot.com bubble burst in the early 2000, and new competition has originated from Asia. Being successful requires now more than before, and joint-use of strategies is one option to survive.

    Design/methodology/approach – A single case study from a Swedish company operating in the telecom manufacturing was conducted. In particular, a Six Sigma project was followed and analyzed during 2002. However, the outcome of the Six Sigma project has been studied in longitudinal manner until 2014.

    Findings – The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today's highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications – This study is limited to large company that usually has a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis as well as has level of control of the supply chain operations. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies and thus it may be more difficult to realize the Lean Six Sigma strategy in such environment. On the other hand, the processes in these companies are often less complex.

    Practical implications – This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes as well as how to perform a Six Sigma project in Lean environment, in a proper manner.

    Originality/value – This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy. The paper will also serve as a basis for other companies and industries, on how to survive in difficult times.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S1-128-S1-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim is to examine if the joint-use strategy of Lean Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, cost-efficiency, and agility at the same time.

    Design/methodology/approach: A single case study including a Swedish company from the telecom manufacturing industry was conducted.

    Findings: A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to large companies that usually have a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies.

    Practical implications: This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes.

    Originality/value: This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lantz, Björn
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Total productive maintenance in support processes: an enabler for operation excellence2015In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 1042-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to stay competitive in today's marketplace, it is vital to reduce activities that do not create value. Lean production has in the last decade been seen as a philosophy to reduce non-value time. The office environment often presents a major improvement opportunity to reduce non-value time. Lean contributes positively to business performance applied in a manufacturing context and is also suggested to do the same in a service context. The purpose of the paper is to analyse and determine how total productive maintenance (TPM) can be applied within the support process and to identify effects from an employee and business perspective. A case study has been performed and a qualitative research approach was selected. Empirical data were gathered by using semi-structured interviews at one case company, but from several teams that had applied TPM. The result was then used as an inductive approach to explore how TPM can be applied in a support process. To implement and apply TPM within an office context, it should be structured in three steps (i) define, (ii) implement and (iii) sustain. TPM should be conducted as a part of the ordinary day-to-day work. The planning and discussions connected to TPM can be included in regular daily departmental stand-up meetings' involving everybody. The work with 5S and maintenance should also be a part of the TPM structure, connecting it as a system and not as an isolated activity. TPM can create value from both a business and an employee perspective. In the employee perspective, TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business perspective, objectives such as cost and quality are improved, but TPM also enables the reduction of waste.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Månsson, B.
    How to extend Lean philosophy to suppliers by training2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Svensson, Victor
    University of Skövde.
    Preventive maintenance is an enabler for operation excellence in support processes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TPM in a Lean office environment can create values both in a business and an employee dimension. In the employee dimension TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business dimension objectives such as cost, quality and supporting the reduction of waste improved. Preventive maintenance meetings can be included and performed once a month in the ordinary departmental “stand-up meetings”. Methods like 5S, which need to be updated on a continuous basis, and standardized maintenance should also be connected to the TPM work. But first all employees should be trained in order to have the same direction/behavior.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    How to Integrate Suppliers by Training in Lean Thinking2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Much research has addressed how to implement lean in a focal company, but little has been published about how to integrate suppliers in strategies and the focal company’s culture, such as lean production or lean thinking. The purpose of the article is to investigate if suppliers can become more integrated in the supply chain by training in lean thinking at the focal company and to explain a possible structure of the training.

    Design/methodology/approach: A multiple-case study has been conducted of the focal com- pany and five of its supply companies. The findings are supported empirically by on-site interviews and by observations, as well as by a binomial two-proportion test that was used to analyse the statistical data of the delivery precision.

    Findings: While the training programme does not show a conclusive result for the supply chain, it has made a difference for all participating suppliers. In most cases the training programme was a trigger that started or boosted the internal work with continuous improvements. In some cases it helped create structured ways of working and improved the internal production flows.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Månsson, Bo
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Yar Hamidi, Daniel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Handels- och IT-högskolan.
    Resilience in the supply and demand chain a new management strategy2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The length and complexity of the supply chain tend to increase, rather than diminish, thereby making the supply chain riskier and less predictable and, hence, more vulnerable. At the same time, customers are becoming increasingly demanding. The challenge to businesses today is to create a resilient supply chain in order to manage and mitigate risk and vulnerability. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use methods and tolls from quality and logistics can improve supply chain resilience. There are five principles that characterise supply chain resilience: risk management culture, agility, design-and innovation-led organisations, collaboration and spreading and anchoring of the vision, goal, values and methods. Using a combined quality management philosophy, the speed of process could be increased, and the responsiveness and flexibility could be improved, which means quicker response to changes. It has also been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy improves the companies’ resilience, due to their increased agility and strengthened ability to handle variability and risk management. Quality management tools can be very effective in the companies’ efforts to control supply chain risk and to identify risk sources of variation, even outside the focal company.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Ottosson, T.
    Larsson, J.
    A Case Study: A quality approach to managing supply chain risks2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Torstensson, A.
    A combined quality approach to controlling supply chain risk2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Interview survey of DFSS adoption in large enterprises2010In: 13th International QMOD Conference, Cottbus, Germany, August 30-September 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lantz, Björn
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Andersson, Roy
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Preliminary tests of normality when comparing three independent samples2016In: Journal of Modern Applied Statistical Methods, ISSN 1538-9472, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 135-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses simulation to explore the performance of a two-stage procedure where a preliminary Shapiro–Wilk test is used to choose between ANOVA and the Kruskal–Wallis test as three-sample location test. The results suggest that the two-stage procedure actually seems to be preferable when conducting such location tests.

  • 26.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Andersson, Roy
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Organisational resilience through crisis strategic planning: a study of Swedish textile SMEs in financial crises of 2007–20112012In: International Journal of Decision Sciences, Risk and Management, ISSN 1753-7169, E-ISSN 1753-7177, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 314-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global financial crises of 2007–2011 have created tremendous impact on Swedish organisations, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In such a context, study of organisational resilience, to survive and thrive, becomes increasingly significant. Key to economic resilience is upheld by crisis management (CM), business continuity planning (BCP) and growth perspectives. Thus crisis strategic planning (CSP) becomes fundamental in underpinning resilience. The study categorises resilient and less resilient SMEs in terms of their financial performance, and identifies what strategies differentiate them. Resilient firms showed better short-term CM through higher operational flexibility, while the less resilient firms lacked strategic readiness. Resilient firms showed more long-term strategies through BCP and growth strategies through market penetration, diversification and transformational initiatives. Multi-strategic initiatives help to develop CSP model, categorising firms along different resilience types, characterised by low and high degrees of planning and adaptation, respectively. Resilient Swedish SMEs mostly showed planned resilience in financial crises.

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