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  • 1.
    Lundström, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Fiktioner och textuniversum2017In: Tolfte nationella konferensen i svenska med didaktisk inriktning: Textkulturer / [ed] B. Ljung Egeland, C. Olin Scheller, M. Tanner, & M. Tengberg, 2017, p. 157-173Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bokens åttonde artikel tar sin utgångspunkt i de förändrade medievanor kring fiktion som konvergenskulturen innebär, närmare bestämt i de textuniversum som bildas kring ett visst innehåll. Textuniversum 15 Sammanfattningar kännetecknas av att inkludera ett stort antal texter i olika medier, där det inte går att dra exakta gränser för innehållet. Syftet med artikeln är att bidra med kunskap om hur deltagare bygger förståelse av innehållet i textuniversum. Detta nås genom att analysera delar av två exempel på textuniversum, Stolthet och fördom samt Fables, med avseende på hur deltagande i universumen möjliggör många olika meningsskapande erfarenheter. Studien bygger på textanalyser och visar hur transformation av meningsbärande delar, fragment, till helheter, mosaiker, kan skapa många olika förståelser av innehållet. Fragmenten transformeras från många olika medier och texter, vilket gör att de ofta kan förstås som transmediala förlängningar som skapar ett nätverk av texter. Fragmenten bidrar till, och ger en ökad förståelse för, kärntexten samt för helhetsbilden, mosaiken. För att analysera strukturer i dessa nätverk används i artikeln en begreppsapparat som utvecklats för att förstå narrativa strukturer i nya medieyttringar och belysa hur meningsskapande och fiktionsförståelse skapas vid konstruerande och användande av textuniversum Artikelns huvudresultat är att deltagande i textuniversum kräver nya sätt att förstå fiktionsanvändning samt att fokus skiftar från klassiska narratologiska textbeskrivningar mot hur deltagare upplever berättelser och konstruerar sammanhang utifrån dem, vilket i förlängningen kan påverka också undervisningen kring fiktion i skolan.

  • 2.
    Lundström, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Teaching and Learning Language, Literature and Media. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Ungdomars fiktionsvanor2017In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 30-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a questionnaire study conducted among Swedish teenagers aged 17-18. The study aims to map out their use of fictional texts through various media forms in the two contexts school and recreational time. The study, which has a quantitative approach, focuses on mediation, gender, and study orientation, when exploring the media habits of Swedish teenagers. The results show that although the participants read fiction, they spend much more time using fictional texts in other media forms, such as computer games, TV-series, and films. Gender differences are visible in that men play computer games and women read literature to a greater extent. There are few prominent differences concerning the choice of educational programme. Instead, the results show that divergence should be considered on an individual level, and that large differences in media use can occur within the same school class. The results are discussed from a media ecological as well as a mediatization perspective, and in relation to an educational context.

  • 3.
    Lundström, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Teaching and Learning Language, Literature and Media.
    Worlds of Many Languages: Learning from Fiction in Multimodal Text Universes2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most young people in their late teens in Sweden, and probably also in many other parts of the world, devote several hours every day to fictional stories. The stories help them to construct realites, create identities, and can, in the most concrete sense, be used as tools in different ways, Bruner (1986) claims. Narrative forms of expression are, however, currently in transition. Novels becomes games, games become movies, movies become TV-series and so on, and everything is mediated digitally and globally in a convergence culture (Jenkins 2006). This cultural transfer places great demands on young people's cutural, medial, and linguistic skills.

    Based on studies conducted through surveys and media journals among people aged 17-18 years, the paper discusses theoretical aspects relevant for literary studies and foreign language learning in a broad sense. The first aspect is transformation (Brummett 1991), that is, the usefulness of combining fragments of different cultures, languages, media, and modalities into text mosaics. This transformation is made possible through various transferal processes, such as the transfer of a story from one medium to another, from one genre to another, from one culture to another etc. Transformation is an essential part of a second aspect, narrative competence (Lundström & Olin-Scheller 2014), which is needed to become a participant in so-called multimodal text universes. In these, an initial story, for example, the story of Harry Potter, is in a constant move between different cultural spaces, semiotic systems, and languages in a way that makes it impossible to isolate the learning of a single language in the way that is or was often achieved in the organisation of institutionalized language teaching. Hence, this paper shows and discusses how the use of fictional stories functions as a way to transgress through different cultural and linguistic systems, and in extension functions as a means for language acquisition.

  • 4.
    Manderstedt, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics. Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Palo, Annbritt
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Think of it as a Challenge: Problematizing Pedagogical Strategies for Assessing and Examining Web-based University Courses2014In: Next Generation Learning Conference NGL2014, Falun, Sverige, 19/03/14 - 20/03/14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the digital revolution in education, Swedish universities increasingly give students the option to study online. For students, web-based alternatives offer freedom to choose from a larger selection of courses and give them a chance to participate regardless of location. Universities are also able to present themselves to a larger student base than what is provided by the immediate geographical environment.

    One implication of the digital revolution is the increasing number of students, which places demands on universities and teachers to deal with a larger diversity concerning students’ individual prerequisites, needs, and their expectations.

    In order to improve the quality and guarantee the validity of examinations in web-based courses, it is crucial to identify the pedagogical challenges specific to online teaching and learning. The aim of this study is to present and problematize a number of pedagogical strategies concerning assessment and examination, thereby contributing to the awareness of pedagogical challenges prevalent in web-based examination and education.

    The method of the project is a case study with empirical data gathered from three literary web-based courses, “The Vampire Story from Dracula to Twilight” (7.5 credits), “Popularizing the Classics: From Elizabeth Bennet and Alice to Bridget Jones and Neo” (7.5 credits) and “Gender, Literature and Media” (7.5 credits), with a total of approximately 750 participants given at Luleå University of Technology in 2010, 2011 and 2013. The empirical material encompasses the course material with particular focus on examination assignments, statistics concerning completion rates, student course evaluations, both qualitative and quantitative, as well as teachers’ reflections.

    The results show that there are three elements that are particularly significant when developing and teaching web-based university courses. First, the teacher’s subject knowledge, pedagogical skills and ICT competences contribute to a successful teaching and learning process. These factors help create a progressive development towards more complex and less subjective assignments. Second, the choice of teaching methods and examination strategies is imperative in order to create an interactive learning environment and a collective identity both of which are significant contributing factors to maintain a low student drop out rate in online courses. Third, it is fruitful to construct a wide range of examination assignments (for example quiz, blog, reflection, wiki and analytical essay). This will create the most varied and “secure” examination environment possible and ensure that one learning process is not favoured over another.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    A Heterogeneous Classroom: An Effect of a New Media Ecology?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most young people in their late teens in Sweden, and probably also in many other parts of the world, devote several hours every day to fictional stories. The stories help them to construct realities, create identities, and can, in the most concrete sense, be used as tools in different ways, Bruner (1986) claims. Narrative forms of expression are, however, currently in transition. Novels becomes games, games become movies, movies become TV-series and so on, and everything is mediated digitally and globally in a convergence culture (Jenkins 2006). This act of transformation places great demands on young people's cultural, medial, and linguistic skills. 

    However, not every student in a class use fictional texts, and those who do use them to a lesser or greater extent, do not use stories in the same text or media form. This varied use of fictional texts contributes to an already heterogeneous classroom. What implication does this heterogeneous classroom have for teaching and learning processes in general and for the teaching of literary studies in particular? Based on the results from a questionnaire study, this paper aims to explore this heterogeneity further, and in addition to discuss the effects of a heterogeneous classroom.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    A Translation of Worlds2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of my thesis on cultural displacement and interaction in Australian immigration literature, I intend here to focus on the use, in migratory texts, of stories and story-telling as means to remember and translate a past elsewhere. While translators are usually seen as cultural mediators, I see that position taken by migration writers who translate worlds as well as words.

     

    My aim is to discuss how discursive translation takes place in the migratory texts, Hiam by Eva Sallis and Heartland by Angelika Fremd. What different discursive strategies are being employed? I want to focus on story-telling as one way for migration writers to translate a linguistic / discursive / cultural Other. Moreover, stories and story-telling also serve as means to create an individual as well as a collective history, a cultural identity and a cultural memory. The stories, which are filtered through a cultural heritage discourse, are not only told in order to ‘educate’ the listener/reader in another culture, but are also attempts at preserving the memory of a past elsewhere. 

  • 7.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    A translation of worlds: Aspects of cultural translation and Australian migration literature2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the exchange of cultural information that takes place in the meeting between immigrant and non-immigrant characters in a selection of Australian novels focusing on the theme of migration: Heartland (1989) by Angelika Fremd, A Change of Skies (1991) by Yasmine Gooneratne, Stella’s Place (1998) by Jim Sakkas, Hiam (1998) by Eva Sallis and Love and Vertigo (2000) by Hsu-Ming Teo. The concept cultural translation functions as a theoretical tool in the analyses. The translation model is particularly useful for this purpose since it parallels the migration process and emphasises the power relations involved in cultural encounters. Within the framework of the study, cultural translation is defined as making an unfamiliar cultural phenomenon familiar to someone. On the intratextual level of the text, the characters take on roles as translators and interpreters and make use of certain tools such as storytelling and food to effect translation. On the extratextual level, Fremd, Gooneratne, Sakkas, Sallis and Teo represent cultural translation in the four thematic areas the immigrant child, storytelling, food and life crisis.

    The first theme, the immigrant child, examined in chapter one, explores the effects of using the immigrant child as translator in communication situations between immigrants and representatives of Australian public institutions. In these situations, the child becomes the adult’s interpreter of the Australian target culture. The role as translator entails other roles such as a link to and a shield against the Australian society and, as a result, traditional power relations are reversed. Chapter two analyses how the second theme, storytelling, is presented as an instrument for cultural education and cultural translation in the texts. Storytelling functions to transfer power relations and resistance from one generation to the next. Through storytelling, the immigrant’s hybrid identity is maintained because the connection to the source culture is strengthened, both for the storyteller and the listener. The third theme, food as a symbol of cultural identity and as representation of the source and target cultures, is explored in chapter three. Source and target food cultures are polarised in the novels, and through an acceptance or a rejection of food from the source or target cultures, the characters symbolically accept or reject a belonging to that particular cultural environment. A fusion between the source and target food cultures emphasises the immigrant characters’ cultural hybridity and functions as a strategic marketing of culturally specific elements during which a specific source culture is translated to a target consumer. Finally, the fourth theme, life crisis, is analysed in chapter four where it is a necessary means through which the characters experience a second encounter with Australia and Australians. While their first encounter with Australia traps the characters in a liminal space/phase that is signified by cultural distancing, the second encounter offers a desire and ability for cultural translation, an acceptance of cultural hybridity and the possibility to become translated beings – a state where the characters are able to translate back and forth between the source and target cultures.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    A Translation of Worlds: The Effects of Cultural Translation on the Migration Process in Hiam and Stella’s Place2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this age, where transnational movements are increasing around the globe, migration is a research area that concerns many disciplines, such as geography, history, anthropology, linguistics as well as cultural- and literary studies, where this study is primarily based. Migration literature involves various levels of encounters that occur when the characters shift geographical regions; above all, the encounter with a “new” cultural environment, a target culture. The migration process is, in my view, a three step process that parallels Arnold van Gennep’s rites of passage developed by Victor Turner which emphasises that there are three phases that occur in all rites of transition, namely separation, transition and incorporation. I see the migration process as a territorial rite of passage that consists of these three phases. As part of my thesis on cultural displacement and translation in Australian immigration literature, I intend, in this paper, to analyse the migration process as portrayed in the two novels Hiam by Eva Sallis and Stella’s Place by Jim Sakkas with a focus on the second, liminal, phase and the third phase, incorporation. My aim is to analyse the effects of cultural translation on the migration process in these two texts. 

  • 9.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Adaptations, Sequels and Success: The Expanding Sense and Sensibility Text Universe2017In: The ESSE Messenger, E-ISSN 2518-3567, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 46-58Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article asks why people are obsessed with Jane Austen’s stories and why her stories are spreading across the globe, across media forms, and across generations? In an attempt to analyse the Austenmania-phenomenon, this article examines various representations of Austen’s Sense and Sensibility in order to discuss what these representations contribute with to the understanding of the source text and to the text universe as a whole. The analysis shows that the re-presentations not only expand Austen’s story and provide insight into the characters and their actions, but also draw attention to historical and contemporary power hierarchies and gender roles.

  • 10.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    Fiktionstexter - Litteraturens värde och ungdomars medievanor2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a multimodal media society that offers narratives in various forms such as novels, poems, movies, TV-series, computer games/console games, music etc., fictional texts are in circulation and have a great impact, specifically among youths who are mass consumers of these texts. How does this circulation affect their media habits and their views on fictional texts?

     

    This paper aims at analysing the media habits of Swedish youths as it is based in a quantitative study that examines the amount of time the informants spend on fictional texts through various media forms in their spare time and as part of their schoolwork. It further analyses these media habits and discusses their effects on the youths’ identity processes and school performances. The study shows that the informants spend more time on fictional texts in their spare time than in school, that they consume more fictional texts than they produce, and that the female informants spend more time producing fictional texts than the male informants – a result that is coloured by the amount of time they spend writing blogs, tweets and diaries. The status of life-writing genres such as blogs, tweets and diaries as fictional texts as well as the effect on the teaching/learning process of using these forms of texts are discussed in more detail in this presentation.

  • 11.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    Food as Cultural Representation and Cultural Translation in Two Migratory Texts2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The term migration, which is used for a movement from one place to another, refers to both emigration and immigration; on the one hand, departing from one place/country and, on the other hand, entering another place/country. Departing, or exiting, from their “home” or “source” country, migrants leave not only their country but also their cultural environment behind, but, at the same time, they bring their “home” or “source” culture to the “host” or “target” country, where it is sometimes nostalgically remembered and sometimes altered and/or translated to the population of the “host” country. Food is a cultural signifier which not only serves as a memory of “home,” but also as a way for migrants to adapt to the “new” culture as well as to translate their home culture to a new audience. Exit is here seen as an element preceding attempts of bringing two cultural environments together.

     

    I intend to focus on the representation of food as it figures in the two migratory texts Love and Vertigo by Hsu-Ming Teo and A Change of Skies by Yasmine Gooneratne. I intend to look at food more specifically in terms of a symbol of the “home” or “source” country and food as an image of cultural belonging. Food is also a way to introduce another culture to the population of the “new” or “target” country, thus cooking can be seen as an act of cultural translation.

  • 12.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Food as Function and Food as Figure: Cultural Translation and Cultural Hybridity in Love and Vertigo and Nina’s Heavenly Delights2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The symbolic meaning of food is a major concern in popular culture and literary studies at present and there are numerous novels, movies, TV-shows etc. that focus on food and its various functions – literary, cultural, and social. This paper responds to the ongoing discussions in food studies, literary criticism, postcolonialism and gender studies, at the same time as it aims to expand the field of food studies further by connecting it with translation studies. Food, which is a highly politicised subject, is one way in which cultural translation takes place as it is used to create an understanding of cultural transfer and the effects thereof. This paper aims to explore food as literary figure and its cultural function as it analyses continuous processes of cultural transfer and the ensuing effect of cultural hybridity in close-reading analyses of Love and Vertigo by Hsu-Ming Teo, and Nina’s Heavenly Delights by Pratibha Parmar. 

  • 13.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    Food as Representation of Cultural and National Stereotypes in Love and Vertigo and Nina’s Heavenly Delights2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper responds to the ongoing discussions in food studies, literary criticism, postcolonialism and gender studies, at the same time as it aims to expand in particular the field of food studies further by connecting it with translation studies. Food, which is a highly politicised subject on a global as well as a local level, is one way in which cultural translation takes place as it is used to create an understanding of different cultures – an understanding that can be seen as a form of cultural translation.

     

    In close-reading analyses of one Australian migration novel, Love and Vertigo by Hsu-Ming Teo, and one British migration movie, Nina’s Heavenly Delights by Pratibha Parmar, this paper explores popular culture’s impact on society as it discusses how the representation of food such as traditional or non-traditional dishes, cooking, serving and eating practices, functions as a means to contrast the immigrant characters’ source and target food cultures. Thus, power structures based on gender and nationality that circulate through these food-related practices are highlighted and also manifested as they are transferred to the consumers of everyday cultural sources such as novels and movies. 

  • 14.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Formal and Informal Learning: The Many Challenges of Teaching English in a Diverse Classroom2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a Language Act (2009) that protects the Swedish language (SOU 2009:600), influences from English are increasing on a regular basis much due to the Internet, movies, and TV. Young people grow up as “digital natives” (Prensky 2001) and learn English in an informal context at a very young age (Cabau 2009). However, not all young people watch movies in the English language and partake in participatory cultures, for example, read and write blogs, take an active part in discussion forums online, or write English fan fiction. As a result of the discrepancy between those students who use English to a great extent through, for example, frequently playing computer games and those students who do not use the English language at all outside a school context, a Swedish classroom contains students of highly diverse knowledge concerning the English language, in this paper referred to as diversity and the diverse classroom. English teachers are thus required to juggle an exceedingly diverse class.

    The study presented in this paper aims to explore in what ways teachers at upper secondary level (grade 10-12) work in a heterogeneous classroom with particular focus on the students’ diverse knowledge of the English language. Presumably, this phenomenon does not differ that much from the situation in other countries where English is taught as a second language and is a highly influential language. Hence, this study has implications for teacher educators and teachers of English as a second language on a global scale

  • 15.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Have multimodal texts entered the Swedish classroom? Teaching literature in upper secondary school2013In: HICE conference proceedings, Honolulu, 2013, p. 919-920Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Literature Teaching and Learning: An Overview2015In: Språkdidaktik: Researching Language Teaching and Learning / [ed] Eva Lindgren och Janet Enever, Umeå: Department of Language Studies , 2015, p. 31-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Litteratur och litteraritet: Multimodala fiktioner i litteraturundervisningen – på gott eller på ont?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Läsning “på riktigt” och “på låtsas”: Lärare och elever i det nya medielandskapet2014In: Vetenskapsrådet, Resultatdialog, Jönköpings högskola, 20-21 november 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnliga elever tillbringar mer tid på att producera fiktionstexter än manliga vilket beror på den tid de lägger på självberättelser. De text- och medieformer gymnasielärare använder i litteraturundervisningen diskuteras och ifrågasätts, speciellt romanens och det tryckta mediets höga status liksom frånvaron av multimodala medieformat och hur man kan bygga vidare på den kunskap elever inhämtar på fritiden.

    Dessa slutsatser framkommer i projektet Fiktion och lärande i nya medielandskap vars syfte är att undersöka de förutsättningar som gäller för att skapa och använda fiktioner i en tid när gränserna mellan olika medier håller på att upplösas. I projektet studeras hur ungdomar använder fiktioner och hur de skapar mening utifrån dem. Projektet fokuserar på ett lärandeperspektiv som utgår ifrån kompetenskrav, undervisningssammanhang och meningsskapande.

  • 19.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Multimodal Text Universes and Teaching Creative Thinking2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a multimodal media society that offers narratives in various forms such as novels, poems, movies, and fan fiction, stories are in constant circulation and have a great impact on people who can be seen as participants in a convergence culture (Jenkins 2006). In a convergence culture, narratives exist in parallel forms; novels, films, tv-series, poems, songs, fan film, computer games etc. A text universe centres around one particular story, a source text, and the parallel stories in various text and media forms that relate to it. This pilot study uses the text universe of The Walking Dead to explore the use of a teaching design that centres on TWD text universe, and the construction of a transmedial product, in order to study how text universes may contribute to the students’ creative thinking. Hence, this study focuses on applied teaching and learning perspectives among teacher students in English as it considers the teacher’s as well as the students’ experiences. Methodologically, the study relies on experiences in the shape of shared practice, analyses of the students’ productions, as well as on semi-structured interviews with the students.

     

    Working with text universes allows the teacher to tap into the text- and media forms the students use in their recreational time. Working with text universes, moreover, might encourage students to recognize texts, patterns, structures, and to adopt an analytical and reflective approach to texts of various kinds. Furthermore, the students’ analyses of creative versions of a particular story that contribute not only to the source text, but also to the whole text universe, as well as their own constructions of transmedial products, can be seen to encourage creative thinking.

  • 20.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Multimodala fiktioner i litteraturundervisningen - på gott eller ont?2014In: Interaktiva medier och lärandemiljöer / [ed] Elza Dunkels och Simon Lindgren, Malmö: Gleerups , 2014, p. 143-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Multimodala (fiktions)texter: korrelation mellan lärarutbildning och läraryrke?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    “New technologies” and “old values”: The function of various text and media forms in literary studies2015In: Educare - Vetenskapliga skrifter, ISSN 1653-1868, no 1, p. 117-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a society where multimodal stories (movies, TV series, and computer games) have a big influence on young people, reports show that young people demonstrate a decrease in reading habits, reading comprehension, and reading abilities. This article analyses to what extent and in what way(s) various text and media forms are used in literary studies at upper secondary level in Sweden through interviews with five teachers, who offer their experiences, ideas, and thoughts on working with various fictional texts. The results show that novels are used most frequently, that the teachers struggle with the decrease in reading habits among their students, that the students prefer and show great knowledge about films, that there is an absence of multimodal fictional texts in literary studies, and that the teachers see that neither text form nor media form has an impact on student performance.

  • 23.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå University.
    Pleasure and Profit: Re-presentations of Jane Austens’s Ever-Expanding Universe2013In: Global Jane Austen: Pleasure, Passion, and Possessiveness in the Jane Austen Community / [ed] Laurence Raw & Robert G. Dryden, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 203-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter takes a closer look at some examples of the numerous re-presentations of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice as it asks what these re-presentations add to the global Austen (text)-universe. By re-contextualizing the story, they emphasize past and present gender roles and same-sex relationships. They also illustrate the wish to interact with Austen’s novel, the desire to tell their side of the story, to alter or to continue the story. Austen’s readers take pleasure in her fiction and feel passionately for her characters. This chapter explores the expansion of the Austen (text)-universe and asks whether this expansion is about pleasure or profit.

  • 24.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Reciprocal Cultural Translation as a Means for Integration in Hiam and Stella’s Place2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes a closer look at two pieces of Australian migration literature that narrate the story of living in exile. It aims to analyse the migration process from separation to integration as portrayed in Hiam by Eva Sallis and Stella’s Place by Jim Sakkas. It more specifically examines reciprocal cultural translation as a means to bridge cultural contrasts, complete the migration process, and achieve a sense of arrival.

     

    Migration literature involves various levels of encounters that occur when the characters shift geographical regions; above all, the encounter with a “new” cultural environment, a target culture. The migration process is, in my view, a three-step process that parallels Arnold van Gennep’s rites of passage (developed by Victor Turner) which encompasse separation, transition and incorporation. I see the migration process as a territorial rite of passage that consists of these three phases. 

  • 25.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Response2013In: Translation Studies, ISSN 1478-1700, E-ISSN 1751-2921, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 111-114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Samtiden enligt Jane Austen2013In: Västerbottenskuriren, ISSN 1104-0246, no 29 maj, p. 39-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Teaching English in a Diverse Classroom: An Effect of the New Media Ecology?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on teaching English in a diverse classroom. This diversity is primarily caused by the discrepancy between those students who use English to a great extent outside the classroom through, for example, frequently playing computer games, and those students who do not use the English language at all outside a school context.

  • 28.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Teaching English in a Diverse Classroom: Difficulties and Possibilities2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a Language Act (2009) that protects the Swedish language, influences from English are increasing on a regular basis much due to the Internet, movies, and TV. Young people grow up as ”digital natives” and thus learn English in an informal context at a very young age. However, not all young people watch movies in the English language without subtitles and partake in participatory cultures, for example, read and write blogs, or write English fan fiction. As a result of the discrepancy between those students who use English to a great extent and those who do not use the English language at all outside a school context, a Swedish classroom contains students of very diverse knowledge concerning the English language. English teachers are thus required to juggle an exceedingly diverse group of people.

     

    This presentation reports on a study that aims to explore to what extent and in what ways teachers work in a heterogeneous classroom with particular focus on the students’ diverse knowledge of the English language. The study was conducted in the spring of 2015 where five teachers at upper secondary level were interviewed, and the results show that four of the five teachers mentioned the students’ diverse knowledge of English being the most challenging part of their work. They employ different strategies, for example, additional assignments, different levels of exercises, using a variety in teaching material and methods, and giving individual feedback to provide the students with a leaning situation that is as individually adjusted as possible.

  • 29.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Text Universe: Literature Teaching and Learning in Transformation2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation is based on the challenge of teaching literature in an increasingly digitalised school. The school is part of a society in which the screen has replaced the book as the natural medium through which stories are told (Livingstone, 2002). The current digital reform in Sweden, and many other countries around the globe, affects young people who use stories in various media forms to a great extent in their recreational time (The Swedish Media Council, 2017; Svensson, 2014). Young people use stories across and within genres and media, for example watch the film, read the novel, play the game, listen to the soundtrack, watch the tv-series, and consume or produce fan fiction or fan film. In other words, they participate in text universes. A text universe consists of (parts of) a storyworld that is recreated and transferred into various textand media forms (Lundström & Svensson, 2017). There is thus a source text that is transmediated (Klastrup & Tosca, 2004) into new stories across various media forms. How do teacher educators prepare future teachers of English at upper secondary level for working with literary studies in an increasingly digital classroom? By focusing on text universes, this paper aims to report on students’ experiences from producing stories within and across media as a form of creative learning.

  • 30.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Text Universe: Teaching Literary Classics Across Analogue and Digital Media Spaces2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Textuniversum, multimodala texter och elevers måluppfyllelse2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens samhälle är ungdomar masskonsumenter av olika sorters texter (Medierådet 2015), men de är också i hög grad delaktiga i textskapandet och befinner sig i en så kallad konvergenskultur (Jenkins 2006). Kännetecknande för konvergenskulturen är bland annat att berättande texter i olika medieformat i stor utsträckning används parallellt, exempelvis romaner, filmer, tv-serier, dikter, musiklåtar, videoklipp, datorspel, serier och fanfiktioner. Ett textuniversum kännetecknas av att samma berättelse förekommer i olika versioner och i olika medieformat och framförallt ungdomar, men också barn och vuxna, deltar i olika textuniversum i hög utsträckning. Syftet med undersökningen är att med utgångspunkt i ungdomars medievanor använda textuniversumet kring The Walking Dead som exempel för att diskutera multimodala texters funktioner och skolans måluppfyllelse i relation till gymnasieskolans litteraturundervisning. Den här undersökningen består således av textanalyser av flera olika texter som ingår i textuniversumet kring The Walking Dead samt av textanalyser av rådande styrdokument för gymnasieskolan i Sverige. Analyserna, som har ett didaktiskt perspektiv, fokuserar därmed spänningsfältet mellan styrdokument och multimodala texter.

    Gunther Kress (2003) anser att människor idag lever i ett multimodalt samhälle, där skärmen har ersatt boken som det dominerande kommunikationsmedlet. I skärmkulturen är således en kombination av bilder, ljud, typografisk text, film osv. det vanligaste sättet att kommunicera. Studiens teoretiska ramverk utgörs av medieekologi för att dels belysa relationen mellan berättelser i olika medieformat, dels belysa relationen mellan ungdomars fritidsanvändning och skolanvändning av berättelser i olika medieformat. Ett medieekologiskt perspektiv innebär att man ser medier som miljöer som alla människor befinner sig i och som präglar dem mycket starkt. Människans förståelse av världen kan inte frigöra sig från de strukturer som medier skapar. Skärmkulturens inträde innebär då en genomgripande förändring för hur världen uppfattas. Medan skriften är tydligt linjär, och därmed organiserar kunskap linjärt, erbjuder skärmkulturen och andra nya medier andra sätt att förmedla innehåll.

    Det råder ingen tvekan om att ungdomar konsumerar och producerar berättelser, fiktioner, i olika medieformat i hög utsträckning på fritiden, men det ser inte likadant ut i skolans litteraturundervisning. Där är det främst typografiska texter i form av romaner eller romanutdrag och noveller, men också film som förekommer (Svensson, 2015). Denna diskrepans, tillsammans med styrdokumentens uppmuntran att använda skönlitteratur, film och andra medier (Skolverket 2011), utgör utgångspunkt för studien vars relevans för forskningsfältet främst kan ses i att den bidrar till diskussionen kring dagens och morgondagens litteraturdidaktik då den fokuserar utrymme, material och verktyg för att nå lärandemålen i litteraturundervisningen. Det behövs mer forskning kring hur multimodala texter kan användas i skolan och effekten av att använda dem både i den litteraturdidaktiska kontexten, men också när det gäller språkämnenas didaktik mer generellt.

     

  • 32.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    The Challenge of Teaching English in a Heterogeneous Classroom2017In: Educare - Vetenskapliga skrifter, ISSN 1653-1868, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 56-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to explore in what way teachers at upper secondary level work in a diverse classroom with particular focus on the student's heterogeneous knowledge of the English language. This heterogeneity, the participants experience, is primarily caused by the discrepancy between those students who use English to a great extent outside the classroom through, for example, frequently playing computer games, and those students who do not use the English language at all outside a school context. In order to explore this aim, a pilot study was conducted where five teachers at upper secondary level were interviewed. The results show that this heterogeneity is their most challenging part of working as English teachers today. It thus adds to other factors, such as, multiculturalism, multilingualism, difficulties with reading and writing etc. and makes it an even more dificult task for teachers to support every student's individualised learning. The results futher show that despite the teachers' attempts to differentiate the English education, there is a lack of, and need for, strategies that are useful to support an individualised learning in a heterogeneous classroom. 

  • 33.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    The First and Second Encounter with Australia: Exploring the Interface of Cultural Translation in Eva Sallis’ Hiam2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this age, where transnational movements are increasing around the globe, not only of goods, but also of people, through, among other things, migration, exile of political and religious refugees, and tourism, migration is a research area that concerns many disciplines, such as geography, history, anthropology, linguistics as well as cultural- and literary studies, where this study is primarily based. Migration literature involves various levels of meetings, or encounters; above all, the encounter with a “new” cultural environment. Migration writers illustrate this encounter – how to survive both the migration and the encounter. As part of my thesis on cultural displacement and translation in Australian immigration literature, I intend, in this presentation, to use the relatively new theoretical field of Translation Studies as a way to make this encounter visible. My aim is to focus on how first and second encounters with the “new” culture, Australia, are presented in terms of cultural translation in Eva Sallis’ Hiam and Jim Sakkas’ Stella’s Place.

     

    In the two migratory texts analysed for this presentation, there is a first and, following a crisis, a second encounter with the new culture, Australia, for the main characters, Hiam and Stella. I intend to discuss how these two encounters vary in terms of cultural translation. The first encounter is the migrant’s first experience of Australia and Australians, where cultural translation mainly occurs in one direction, i e Australia is translated to the migrants – a translation that is either willingly or unwillingly received, a necessity, or resisted.

     

    In these two particular texts, there is also what I refer to as a second encounter. This second encounter follows a crisis, a period of “madness,” which could be self experienced, or perceived by others, a mental illness, or a psychological trauma. The second encounter with Australia and Australians produces a changed approach to this new cultural environment, which allows for a dialogic, rather than a one-directed, cultural translation.

     

    I will also analyse the situation of “1.5,” or second generation immigrants, who, after a very quick first encounter, almost immediately find themselves in a situation similar to that of the second encounter. This position is at the centre for translation, “the contact zone,” in-between cultures and languages, which is why I will discuss issues of hybridity and multiple cultural belongings in this presentation on: “The First and Second Encounter with Australia: Exploring the Interface of Cultural Translation in Two Migratory Texts.”

  • 34.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    The Immigrant Child as Translator2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of my thesis, in which I use the theoretical field of translation studies in order to shed new light on cultural translation, interaction and dynamics in Australian immigration literature, I intend here to focus on various aspects of the role of the immigrant child as translator in the two texts: Hiam by Eva Sallis and Stella’s Place by Jim Sakkas.

    My aim is to discuss how cultural translation is performed in these two texts and in particular what the impacts are on the child as well as the family for being used, or forced to use, a child as translator. By translator I here mean the fact that since the immigrant child grows up with access to (at least) both languages, he/she becomes the family translator, the mediator between adults and various institutional representatives such as doctors and teachers, the negotiator, and also the interpreter of the “new” culture.

    I want to focus on how, in these texts, the child is used in situations of interaction; what different discursive strategies are being employed? Besides the role as interlingual translator, the child is, due to his/her linguistic, cultural, as well as social competence, also used as an instrument that will help the parents survive and as a shield against the new and frightening society.

    One result of the immigrant child being weighed down with these responsibilities is that the power structure of the whole family is turned upside down. How is the family dealing with that? The fact that the parents are unable to speak the language and have difficulties handling the everyday life on their own may have fatal consequences.

  • 35.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    The Media Habits of Swedish Youths: A Survey Study of Media Use as a Spare Time Activity and as Schoolwork  among Swedish Youths2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    The media habits of young people in Sweden: The use of fictional texts in a school and a recreational context2014In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 337-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a questionnaire study of the media habits of Swedish youth aged 17–18. It examines the time they spend on using fictional texts through various media forms as well as in relation to mode (production/consumption), context (spare time/school), and gender (male/female). It further analyses these media habits and, using media ecology theory, discusses their effects on the learning process. The study shows that the participants spend more time using fictional texts, predominantly through audio-visual media forms, in their leisure time than in school, that they consume more fictional texts than they produce, and that the female participants spend more time producing fictional texts than the male participants – a result that is coloured by the amount of time they spend blogging, tweeting and writing diaries. The effects of such life-writings on teaching and learning processes, as well as on school performances are also discussed.

  • 37.
    Svensson, Anette
    Umeå universitet.
    Translating a Past Elsewhere2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of my thesis on cultural displacement and interaction in Australian immigration literature, I intend here to focus on the translation of a past elsewhere as it figures in Eva Sallis’ Hiam. I will discuss how the migration writers translate a source culture to an English-speaking target audience. While translators are usually seen as cultural mediators, I see that position taken by migration writers who translate worlds as well as words.

     

    My aim is to discuss how discursive translation takes place in this migratory text. What different discursive strategies are being employed? I want to focus on story-telling as one way for migration writers to translate a linguistic / discursive / cultural Other. The stories, which are filtered through a cultural heritage discourse, are not only told in order to ‘educate’ the listener/reader in another culture, but are also attempts at preserving the memory of a past elsewhere. 

  • 38.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Almgren White, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Haglind, Therese
    Textuniversum och gränsöverskridande lärande2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Haglind, T.
    Text Universe: Teaching and Learning Within and Across Genres and Media2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Haglind, Therése
    Jönköping kommun.
    Multimodala textuniversum, kreativt lärande och bedömning2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Haglind, Therése
    Erik Dahlbergsgymnasiet Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ebefors, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Textuniversum i praktiken2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samhällets och skolans pågående digitalisering medför nya litteraturdidaktiska förutsättningar och utmaningar i klassrummet. Ämnesplaner har reviderats och innehåller förtydliganden kring digitalisering. I ämnesplanen för svenska på gymnasiet står det till exempel att "eleverna [ska] ges förutsättningar att utveckla sin förmåga att orientera sig, läsa, sovra och kommunicera i en digital textvärld med interaktiva och föränderliga texter” (Skolverket, 2018). Dagens elever har förkunskaper och är förtrogna med andra medier än de som traditionellt sett är dominerande i skolan. Idag är det vanligt att ungdomar ser filmen, läser boken, spelar spelet, lyssnar på soundtrack och tittar på tv-serien, det vill säga de deltar i textuniversum. Ett textuniversum bygger på att en berättelse, eller delar därav, återskapas i olika text- och medieformat (Lundström & Svensson, 2017). Denna presentation bygger på tre pilotstudier där arbete med olika textuniversum har genomförts på olika skolstadier. Syftet med det övergripande arbetet är att bidra med kunskap om hur textuniversum tillsammans med en lektionsdesign kan bidra till att elever utvecklar ett analytiskt och kreativt tänkande. Pilotstudierna genomförsmed ett praktiknära förhållningssätt där delar av lektionsdesignen genomförs kollaborativt och både forskare och lärare är aktiva. Lektionsdesignen består av tre faser; planeringsfasen, genomförandefasen och utvärderingsfasen. I planeringsfasen samarbetar forskaren och läraren, här fastställs lektionsdesignen och textuniversum väljs. I genomförandefasen genomför och dokumenterar läraren designen som innebär att först arbeta medkärntexten, sedan gruppvis med andra delar av textuniversumet (fragment) och slutligen skapas tvärgrupper med syftet att skapa en transmedial produkt. I utvärderingsfasen genomförs intervjuer med elever och lärare samt analyser av dokumentation och insamlade produkter. I resultatdelen presenteras de genomförda pilotstudierna; Harry Potter, Stolthet & fördom och The Walking Dead med fokus på att visa resultat från datainsamlingen samt att levandegöra textuniversumen för att förtydliga och konkretisera arbetet i klassrummet.

  • 42.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Lundström, Stefan
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Fiktionernas textuniversum: Två empiriska exempel2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens samhälle är ungdomar masskonsumenter av olika sorters texter (Medierådet 2015), men de är också i hög grad delaktiga i textskapandet. Ofta finns en innehållsmässig relation mellan produktion och konsumtion. I denna så kallade konvergenskultur (Jenkins 2006) kan deltagarna därför benämnas prosumenter (Toffler 1980). Kännetecknande för konvergenskulturen är bland annat att berättande texter i olika medieformat i stor utsträckning används parallellt, exempelvis romaner, dikter, filmer, tv-serier, musiklåtar, videoklipp, datorspel, serier och fanfiktioner. Textuniversum, dvs. när ett visst fiktionsinnehåll uttrycks i olika text- och medieformat (jfr Lundström & Olin-Scheller 2010), är exempel på sådan parallell användning.

    Med utgångspunkt i ungdomars användning av textuniversum i en fritidskontext presenterar föredraget modalitets- och värdeanalyser av de två olika textuniversumen Pride and Prejudice och Fables. Analyserna har även ett didaktiskt perspektiv och fokuserar dels hur fiktionsanvändningen kan se ut, dels vilket lärande som äger rum i användningen. Resultaten diskuteras i relation till skolans undervisning kring fiktionstexter.

    I analysen av textuniversumet kring Jane Austens Pride and Prejudice ställs ”klassikern” i centrum. Tidigare forskning visar att gymnasielärare uppfattar att klassiker är svåra att undervisa om eftersom eleverna tycker att de är svåra att läsa (Svensson, 2015). Pride and Prejudice är ett textuniversum som idag uppvisar en mycket omfattande (fritids)användning, med ett stort antal texter från olika tider som relaterar till ursprungstexten. Analysen belyser hur en klassiker kan bidra till en textförståelse på både individuell och kollektiv nivå idag.

    I analysen av Fables, ett textuniversum som använder karaktärer från klassiska sagor i realistiska miljöer, fokuseras dels på hur re-mediering och intertextualitet kan se ut inom textuniversum, dels på hur normer idag kan uppstå kring, och påverka läsningen av, fritidens fiktioner.

  • 43.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Lundström, Stefan
    Kärlek och galenskap: intertextualitet i Anne på Grönkulla och Batman som textuniversum2019In: Digitalt: Svensklärarens årsskrift 2018 / [ed] Anna Nordenstam & Suzanne Parmenius-Swärdh, Stockholm: Natur & Kultur Läromedel , 2019, p. 44-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Svensson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Media, Literature and Language Didactics.
    Manderstedt, Lena
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Palo, Annbritt
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    "Think of it as a challenge": Problematizing pedagogical strategies for progression when assessing web-based university courses in literary studies2015In: Læring og Medier, ISSN 1903-248X, E-ISSN 1903-248X, Vol. 8, no 13, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyse how a taxonomy-based course design can support students’ qualitative learning processes in online university courses. The paper presents a case study based on two online courses in comparative literature in Swedish and English. A document analysis has been applied to analyse the empirical material, which includes the syllabuses, study guides, and examination assignments connected to the courses. Socio-cultural aspects of learning processes, assessment and feedback, course design using a taxonomic structure (SOLO), and a progressive theory of literary studies (Langer’s theories of envisionment) function as a framework. The results show that the examination assignments aim to further the students’ educational processes from stage 2 to stage 5 of the SOLO-taxonomy and, at the same time, through Langer’s four stances. While the course structure has a positive effect on the students’ general as well as literary progress, there are some pedagogical challenges with online teaching in literature that are discussed. In addition, the examination assignments could have been used as ways to strengthen the students’ socio-cultural learning. Furthermore, with little alterations, the examination assignments, which were all used as means of summative assessment, could also have been used formatively to assess the students’ progress.

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