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  • 1.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change (SCOHOS).
    Education level explains participation in work and education later in life2017In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prolonged working life is crucial for sustaining social welfare and fiscal stability for countries facing ageing populations. The group of older adults is not homogeneous; however, differences within the group may affect the propensity to continue working and to participate in continuing education. The aim of this paper is to explore how participation in work and education vary with gender, age, and education level in a sample of older adults. The study was performed in Sweden, a context characterized by high female labour-market-participation rates and a high average retirement age. The participants were 232 members of four of the major senior citizens? organizations. We found no differences in participation in work and education based on gender. People older than 75 years were found to be as active as people 65?75 years old in education, but the older group worked less. There were positive associations between education level and participation in both work and education. Hence, this study implies that socio-economic inequalities along these dimensions are widened later in life. This highlights the importance of engaging workers with lower education levels in educational efforts throughout life. It also emphasizes the need for true lifelong learning in society.

  • 2.
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Bridge employment – att arbeta efter 672019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Wranker, Lena Sandin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kabir, Zarina Nahar
    Division of Nursing, NVS, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change (SCOHOST), Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Everyday Health among Older People: A Comparison between Two Countries with Variant Life Conditions2017In: Journal of Aging Research, ISSN 2090-2204, E-ISSN 2090-2212, article id 2720942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study described health factors of importance for everyday health, such as pain, tiredness, and sleeping problems, in a cross-national context. Data for persons 60+ years were obtained from the Poverty and Health in Aging study, Bangladesh, and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Blekinge. The strongest associations with everyday health in Sweden were found for pain and tiredness, while in Bangladesh they were financial status, tiredness, and sleeping problems. As similarities were found regarding the associations of tiredness on everyday health, tiredness may be a universal predictor of everyday health in older adults irrespective of country context.

  • 4.
    Finkel, D.
    et al.
    Indiana University, USA.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Longitudinal trends in functional biological age: Impact of lifestyle factors2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 61-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, Indiana.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jylhävä, Juulia
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bai, Ge
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiological and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,and Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA .
    Functional Aging Index Complements Frailty in Prediction of Entry into Care and Mortality.2019In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 1980-1986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to develop a functional aging index (FAI) that taps four body systems: sensory (vision and hearing), pulmonary, strength (grip strength), and movement/balance (gait speed) and to test the predictive value of FAI for entry into care and mortality.

    METHOD: Growth curve models and cox regression models were applied to data from 1695 individuals from three Swedish longitudinal studies of aging. Participants were aged 45 to 93 at intake and data from up to 8 follow-up waves were available.

    RESULTS: The rate of change in FAI was twice as fast after age 75 as before, women demonstrated higher mean FAI, but no sex differences in rates of change with chronological age were identified. FAI predicted entry into care and mortality, even when chronological age and a frailty index were included in the models. Hazard ratios indicated FAI was a more important predictor of entry into care for men than women; whereas it was a stronger predictor of mortality for men than women.

    CONCLUSIONS: Measures of biological aging and functional aging differ in their predictive value for entry into care and mortality for men and women, suggesting that both are necessary for a complete picture of the aging process across genders.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-19 00:01
  • 6.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Functional biological age as marker of systemic aging processes2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal trajectories of functional biological age: Comparisons across gender2017In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 375-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used an alternate age variable, functional biological age (fBioAge), which was based on performance on functional body measures. The aim was to examine development of fBioAge across the adult life span, and to also examine potential gender differences and genetic and environmental influences on change with age. We used longitudinal data (n = 740; chronological age (ChronAge) range 45-85 at baseline) from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The rate of increase in fBioAge was twice as fast after ChronAge 75 than before. fBioAge was higher in women than in men. fBioAge was fairly equally influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Whereas the rate of ChronAge cannot vary across time, gender, or individual, our analyses demonstrate that fBioAge does capture these within and between individual differences in aging, providing advantages for fBioAge in the study of aging effects.

  • 8.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Indiana University Sotheast, USA.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal changes in functional biological age2015In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 688-688Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Division of Nursing, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A cross-cultural perspective on aging and memory: Comparisons between Bangladesh and Sweden2012In: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0252, E-ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 69-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on cognitive aging have been conducted in high-income countries (mainly on Western populations). The main aim of this study was to compare the relative importance of predictors of episodic and semantic memory performance in older people (≥ 60years) from Bangladesh (n = 400) and Sweden (n = 1,098). Hierarchical regression models were used in order to study the importance of some commonly used predictors in the two countries. A main finding was that variations in age did not have much impact on episodic and semantic memory performance in Bangladesh. Instead, sex was a strong predictor for semantic memory performance. In Sweden this pattern was reversed. In the Western world, chronological age is believed to be strongly associated with memory performance in cross-sectional studies, particularly in people greater than 60 years of age. This study indicates that the difference between the two countries (in relative importance of the predictors included in this study) is mainly due to the fact that years of education is connected to age in the Western world but to sex in Bangladesh. It remains to be examined whether earlier selective survival is also responsible for the relative absence of cognitive age differences in Bangladesh.

  • 10.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lövdén, Martin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Different context but similar cognitive structures: Older adults in rural Bangladesh2016In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research in cognitive aging is based on literate participants from high-income and Western populations. The extent to which findings generalize to low-income and illiterate populations is unknown. The main aim was to examine the structure of between-person differences in cognitive functions among elderly from rural Bangladesh. We used data from the Poverty and Health in Aging (PHA) project in Bangladesh. The participants (n = 452) were in the age range 60–92 years. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the fit of a five-factor model (episodic recall, episodic recognition, verbal fluency, semantic knowledge, processing speed) and to examine whether the model generalized across age, sex, and literacy. This study demonstrates that an established model of cognition is valid also among older persons from rural Bangladesh. The model demonstrated strong (or scalar) invariance for age, and partial strong invariance for sex and literacy. Semantic knowledge and processing speed showed weak (or metric) sex invariance, and semantic knowledge demonstrated also sensitivity to illiteracy. In general, women performed poorer on all abilities. The structure of individual cognitive differences established in Western populations also fits a population in rural Bangladesh well. This is an important prerequisite for comparisons of cognitive functioning (e.g., declarative memory) across cultures. It is also worth noting that absolute sex differences in cognitive performance among rural elderly in Bangladesh differ from those usually found in Western samples.

  • 11.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Palmer, Katie
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasan, Mohammed I.
    International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Associations between functional biological age and cognition among older adults in rural Bangladesh: Comparisons with chronological age2019In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 814-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We constructed a functional biological age (fBioAge) indicator by using four functional variables: grip strength, forced expiratory lung volume, visual acuity, and hearing. Our aim was to compare how chronological age (ChronAge) and fBioAge are related to cognitive abilities in older adults.

    Method: We used data from the Poverty and Health in Aging project, Bangladesh. Participants (N = 400) were 60+ years of age and diagnosed as nondemented. Examined cognitive abilities were four episodic memory measures (including recall and recognition), two verbal fluency indicators, two semantic knowledge, and two processing speed tasks.

    Results: fBioAge accounted for cognitive variance beyond that explained by ChronAge also after controlling for medical diagnoses and blood markers.

    Discussion: Compared with ChronAge, fBioAge was a stronger predictor of cognition during a broad part of the old adult span. fBioAge seems, in that respect, to have the potential to become a useful age indicator in future aging studies. 

  • 12.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Factors associated with grip strength decline in older adults2014In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 269-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: few studies have examined associations of multi-faceted demographic, health and lifestyle factors with longterm change in grip strength performance across the adult lifespan. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of risk factors in specific parts of the adult lifespan (e.g. in early midlife, in late midlife and in old adulthood) separately for women and men.

    Methods: data came from the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). Grip strength performance was followed in 849 participants who were 5088 years of age at baseline. The follow-up period with seven waves of data of grip strength was 22 years, and the risk factors were measured up to 20 years before the assessment of grip strength. Latent growth modelling was used for the longitudinal analyses.

    Results: a gender difference in the type of factors associated with grip strength performance and development across the adult lifespan was found. Significant factors for the age slopes for women were stress, smoking and dementia. For men, marital status, mean arterial pressure, physical activity at work and having a chronic disorder were of importance. These factors varied in their associations with grip strength across the adult lifespan.

    Conclusion: factors measured earlier in adulthood were associated with grip strength decline in late midlife and old adulthood. Gender-specific patterns of risk factors suggest that it may be worthwhile to conduct research on grip and muscle strength (and biological vitality) separately for men and women.

  • 13.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside.
    Finkel, Deborah
    4 Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Grip Strength and Cognitive Abilities: Associations in Old Age2016In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 841-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Both physical functioning and cognitive abilities are important for well-being, not least in old age. Grip strength is often considered an indicator of general vitality and, as such, may predict cognitive functioning. Few longitudinal studies have examined the relationship between grip strength and cognition, especially where specific cognitive abilities have been targeted.

    METHOD: Participants (n = 708, age range: 40-86 years at baseline) came from the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. We used a longitudinal follow-up of 6 waves during 20 years. For the analyses, we used latent growth modeling, where latent growth trajectories were fitted to the cognitive traits (verbal ability, spatial ability, processing speed, and memory) or to the grip strength values and each, respectively, treated as time-varying covariates of the other trait.

    RESULTS: Results supported a longitudinal influence of grip strength on changes in cognitive function. Grip strength performance was associated with change in the 4 cognitive abilities after age 65 years.

    DISCUSSION: A rather stable connection was found between grip strength and cognitive abilities starting around 65 years of age. The starting period suggests that the association may be due to lifestyle changes, such as retirement, or to acceleration of the aging processes.

  • 14.
    Wahlin, Åke
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Aging research center, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of medicine, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Palmer, Katie
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Stockholm Brain Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Kabir, Zarina Nahar
    Division of Nursing, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts among elderly persons in rural Bangladesh2015In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1999-2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression, if broadly defined, is the commonest late-life mental disorder. We examined the distribution of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts, across age, sex, literacy, and marital status, among elderly individuals residing in rural Bangladesh and participating in a population-based study on health and aging.

    Methods: Prevalence figures of depressive symptoms were assessed with SRQ20 (n = 625), and possible social network and economic associations were examined. Morbidity accounts of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts were examined for a subsample that also underwent complete medical examination (n = 471).

    Results: We selected for analyses the items that corresponded to DSM-IV criteria and constructed a dichotomous variable. The prevalence was 45%, and most pronounced among the oldest women (70%). The overall prevalence of suicidal thoughts was 23%. Being a woman, illiterate or single were all risk factors for depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. These associations remained unaccounted for by the social network and economic variables. Co-residing with a child and having a high quality of contact were protectiveof both depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. The main findings were replicated in the subsample, where it was found that morbidities were also associated with the outcomes, independently of the four main predictors.

    Conclusions: Prevalence figures for depressive symptoms among elderly in rural Bangladesh are high.  Demographic, social network, and morbidity factors are independently associated with both depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. This is the first study to report prevalence figures for depressive symptoms in this population.

1 - 14 of 14
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