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  • 1.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring the design platform in industrialized housing for efficient design and production of customized houses2019In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems: Proceedings of the 26th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, July 30 – August 1, 2019 / [ed] K. Hiekata, B. Moser, M. Inoue, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, p. 125-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building (IHB) is a sector offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Customer satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and the fast-paced introduction of new technology in combination with short lead-times and cost-efficient production. Product platforms is acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. The strategy has been a necessity in the mechanical industry for several decades. However, for IHB, platforms have only gained interest in recent years. In general, ETO companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions require standardization of the product offer which reduces the customization ability which is regarded as a competitive edge. The Design Platform (DP) approach was developed aimed to support ETO companies by utilizing different types of engineering assets in a coherent transdisciplinary model enabling efficient customization. The long-term aim of this work is to investigate and support the DP applicability in IHB to increase efficiency in development and delivery. For this article, data were gathered from a single case study, including workshops with company representatives combined with interviews and document analysis. Based on the data analysis, engineering assets were identified and characterized. Further, a conceptual PLM solution is proposed and outlined to support the DP application combined with the assets. The results suggest that a PLM system can host parts of the DP and that it is applicable in IHB.

  • 2.
    André, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    PLM support for the Design Platform in industrialized housing for efficient design and production of customized housesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bosch, Petra
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Hinder och drivkrafter för BIM i medelstora entreprenadföretag. SBUF-rapport 130692016Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bosch-Sijtsema, Petra
    et al.
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, division Construction Management, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, division of Innovation and R&D Management, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Barriers and facilitators for BIM use among Swedish medium-sized contractors: We wait until someone tells us to use it2017In: Visualization in Engineering, ISSN 2213-7459, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pace of diffusion of BIM (Building Information Modelling) use is considered to increase with governmentalinitiatives in which public clients in countries like Finland, Singapore, United Kingdom, and Sweden begin requiring BIM as apart of the project delivery. Currently, larger contractor firms use BIM to a certain extent. However, BIM use by mid-sizedcontractor firms (that is, firms with 50–500 employees that can successfully compete with larger contractors on projects costinga maximum of 50 million Euros) is relatively unknown. Hence, the aim of the paper is to explore current use and perceivedconstraints and driving forces of BIM-implementation with respect to mid-sized contractors.

    Methods: A mixed method approach was applied, and data was collected through an interview study and a survey involvingchief executive officers or their closest sub-ordinates in mid-sized contractor firms in Sweden. The survey was based on atechnology-, organization-, and environment framework that is used in information systems research to study the use of inter-organizational information systems. The total population of firms in the survey corresponded to 104. The study presented thepreliminary results based on 32 answers (with a 31% response rate).

    Results: Fifty-eight percent of the surveyed respondents stated that they had been involved in a project in which BIM wasused in some manner. The most commonly used application included visualization, which also facilitates coordination andcommunication. The biggest perceived constraints involved partners that did not use BIM, lack of demand from clients, andthe absence of internal demand in the company. With respect tothe two last obstacles, significant differences existedbetween users and non-users. The most common perceived driving forces included the fact that BIM is perceived as ameans to follow technical development and that BIMprovides competitive advantages to the company.

    Conclusions: It is concluded that the main driver responsible for BIM-implementation is mainly determined by anindividual’s subjective positive or negative evaluation of BIM, instead of external pressure from clients and partners or by theinternal capacity and knowledge to use BIM.

  • 5.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Customizations vs. Platforms: A Conceptual Approach to COSI2018In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management for Data-Driven, Intelligent, Collaborative, and Sustainable Manufacturing. APMS 2018. / [ed] I. Moon, G. Lee, J. Park, D. Kiritsis & G. von Cieminski, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 116-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many manufacturers have experienced an increased demand for customized products and services, which requires the manufacturer to simultaneously offer both standardized and customized products. Consequently, several manufacturing strategies must be efficiently employed. These companies do not express the same prerequisites as ‘pure’ ETO companies since they need to be able to differentiate customized orders from standard orders, but also be able to differentiate between the manufacturing dimension and the engineering dimension of customization. Whereas standard orders can be processed with a platform approach, the customized orders contain specific requirements and information represented by ‘customer-order specific information’ (COSI). This paper defines and presents competitive scenarios where platform constraints are combined with COSI for efficient customizations. Implications for the approach and a path forward is discussed.

  • 6.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Engström, Dan
    Swerea IVF.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Design Thinking as Facilitator for Sustainable Innovation: Exploring Opportunities at SMEs in the Swedish Wood Products Industry2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design thinking (DT) is the application of design practice as an approach to innovate and initiate change. Recently, DT has received increasing attention as an approach to address sustainability challenges. However, this area is less studied. The purpose of this study was to explore how DT could enable small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Swedish wood products industry to create more sustainable offers. Various actors from this industry have identified the need to develop sustainable offers, although few discuss how this is realized. Interviews have been conducted with six SMEs to increase understanding on challenges they perceive with developing sustainable products. Current practice is compared to potential benefits of DT described in literature. Three main benefits of DT for SMEs have been identified. It could enable SMEs [1] to redefine the purpose of their offers, [2] to better address needs and [3] to address conflicting requirements regarding sustainability.

  • 7.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Platform Models for Agile Customization – What's Beyond Modularization?2018In: Transdisciplinary Engineering Methods for Social Innovation of Industry 4.0: Proceedings of the 25th ISPE Inc. International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Margherita Peruzzini, Marcello Pellicciari, Cees Bil, Josip Stjepandić, Nel Wognum, IOS Press, 2018, p. 371-380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are suppliers that deliver unique solutions to different business customers. Intense quotation work, with a high demand on accuracy and quick response, and development projects executed in close collaboration with customers and other actors characterize these companies. The projects can run for years or a few weeks depending on the business. Changes of requirements are frequent and technology development required for improved functionality, sustainability and competitiveness. The use of a product platform has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for product family development and mass customization. However, companies struggle with adopting the common platform approach building upon pre-defined modules and components as it constraints the fulfilment of unique customer requirements and the introduction of new technology at high pace. This work reports the results from case studies conducted in collaboration with four companies. They are in many ways different but face the same challenges when it comes to customization, fluctuating requirements and need of high pace in technology advancement. The focus of this paper is on their initial states; including how they work with their product concept before the customer entry point, the work that is initiated when an order is accepted, the character of requirements and the adoption of product platforms. Criteria on, and identification of, new platforms models, termed Design Assets, are presented followed by a mapping to the Design Platform concept pointing out areas upcoming work, both scientifically and at the companies.

  • 8.
    Isaksson, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Bosch, Petra
    Chalmers.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    BIM use in the production process among medium sized contractors: A survey of Swedish medium sized contractors2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is claimed to transform the AEC industry, whereas current research has argued that diffusion of BIM use proceeds at a slower rate than the optimistic predictions. However, governmental initiatives where public clients in countries like Finland, Singapore, United Kingdom and Sweden start to require a Building Information Model as a part of the project delivery, are supposed to increase the pace of diffusion of BIM use. Today, larger contractor firms use BIM to a varying extent. But BIM use in mid-sized contractor firms, with 50 – 500 employees, which successfully can compete with larger contractors on projects up to 50 million Euros, is relatively unknown. The aim of the paper is to explore the current use and perceived challenges and driving forces of BIM-implementation among mid-sized contractors. The data used in this study is collected through a survey send to chief executive officers, or their closest sub-ordinates, of mid-sized construction firms in Sweden. The survey is based on a technology-, organization-, environment framework that is used in information systems research in order to study the use of inter-organizational information systems. The total population of firms in the survey is 136. The preliminary results presented in this paper are based on 31 answers (30 percent response rate). 58 percent of the respondents said that they have been involved in a project where BIM has been used in some way. The most commonly used application is visualization. The highest obstacles perceived are that partners are not using BIM, there is no demand from clients, and there is no internal demand in the company. For the two last obstacles there were significant differences between users and non-users. The most common perceived driving forces were that BIM is a means for following the technical development and BIM can give the company competitive advantages. Moreover, the results indicate that the main driver behind BIM-implementation is mainly determined by an individual’s subjective positive or negative evaluation of BIM, rather than by external pressure from clients and partners, or by internal capacity and knowledge to use BIM.

  • 9. Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Mukkavaara, Jani
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Breakdown Structure in the Digitalization of Design Work for Industrialized House-Building: A Case Study of Systems Building Using Predefinition Levels of Product Platforms2019In: ICCREM 2019: Innovative Construction Project Management and Construction Industrialization / [ed] Yaowu Wang, Ph.D., Mohamed Al-Hussein, Ph.D., and Geoffrey Q. P. Shen, Ph.D., American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019, p. 49-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies predefine parameters in platforms. In the strive to identify efficient information flow with automation and configuration, the design process requires a breakdown of the product structure of a building to digitally communicate between information systems. The level of predefinitions varies between industrialized house-builders according to market position, type of building processes, and maturity in business. The client decoupling point according to the predefinitions of house-building as a product is central for how and when production information is created. Bill of materials is a breakdown structure that visualize relations and the transformation between engineering, preparation, and production processes from a life cycle perspective. A case study at eight house-building companies was chosen with the aim to identify relations between the level of predefinitions and breakdown structures. House-building platforms with a high level of predefinition on layouts, components, and interfaces show a tendency to use less time in BIM-tools for engineering work and a high level of parameters in manufacturing configuration systems to prepare for production. Meanwhile, the opposite with low levels of predefinitions on components and interfaces focus on BIM-tools for engineering work with longer lead times. An interesting outcome is those with a high level of predefinitions in interfaces but lower levels on component dimensions. These companies have the ability to position their offer to a wide market with flexibility in the engineering work and need to communicate the high levels of interface parameters for the manufacturing sequence with a breakdown of the product together with architects.

  • 10.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Getting the most out of a collaborative research project – Cross industry design for a holistic view and increased learning2018In: Proceedings of the 34th Annual ARCOM Conference, 3-5 September 2018, Belfast, UK / [ed] C. Gorse, & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2018, p. 526-535Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, collaborative research has gained recognition. The balance between scientific rigour and practical relevance is a continuing issue within construction management research. The purpose of this paper it to describe a cross-industry and cross disciplinary approach to co-creation of knowledge through a collaborative research approach. A collaborative research project on the topic communication regarding customer specific demands is presented using a model with two interacting cycles for knowledge creation. Two construction companies, a housing company with off-site manufacturing and a small subcontractor manufacturing street doors and front doors, are participating. Four other companies within mechanical manufacture, telecom and consultancy are involved. To engage the companies, the project emphasizes activities not adding any contribution to academic production. Networking, industrial education, publications in trade journals, participation in trade fairs etc. might be essential to convince the industry of the practical relevance. The findings prove that applied research does not need to be isolated to specific industries or disciplines, as the collected data are applicable to the different participating companies' despite of their differences. 

  • 11.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Exploring Product Development in Industrialized Housing to Facilitate a Platform Strategy2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] González, V.A., Chennai, India: The International Group for Lean Construction , 2018, p. 538-548Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house-building companies are offering unique products by adopting an engineer-to-order (ETO) strategy. Client satisfaction is achieved by adaptation of product solutions and swift introduction of new technology in combination with cost-efficient production and short lead-time for completion. Product development is executed in collaboration with the clients and changes in requirements are frequent. The use of product platforms, where external and internal efficiency are well-balanced, has been acknowledged as a strategic enabler for mass customization and increased competitiveness. However, ETO-companies struggle with adopting the common product platform approach, set by pre-defined modules and components. Predefinitions may cause an imbalance between product development and a lean production system. The aim of this work was to analyse current strategies and support to master the balance of external and internal efficiency in product development within industrialized housebuilding to facilitate the development of a product platform strategy. Data were gathered from a single case study and an on-going product platform development and includes interviews and document analysis. The findings show that product development is guided by a technical platform, but there is an imbalance where external efficiency is prioritized over the internal efficiency.

  • 12.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Movaffaghi, Hamid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Exploration of the BIM Development and Application: Identifying Key Areas for the Industrialized House-Building Sector2018In: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering. 5-7 June 2018, Tampere, Finland. / [ed] Mela, K., Pajunen, S. and Raasakka, V., 2018, p. 1030-1037Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is claimed to transform the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, whereas current research has argued that diffusion of BIM use proceeds at a slower rate than the optimistic predictions. Much of the research on BIM has focused on the traditional part of the industry and larger companies, whereas less attention has been paid to the industrialized house-builders. The underlying idea of industrialized house-building is to increase efficiency, both internally (do things right) and externally (do the right things), with repetitiveness in production facilities. Previous research indicates that there is a lack of demand for BIM, both internally and externally, and that BIM use is rather determined by an individual’s subjective positive or negative evaluation of BIM, which may be hazardous for industrialized house-builders. However, using BIM in repetitive processes is claimed to have potential to improve the output of industrialized housing building.

    Hence, based on this background the aim of the paper is twofold: Firstly, to explore the current state of practice, and perceived constraints and driving forces of BIM-use with respect to industrialized house-building. Secondly; based on the results identify key areas for the continuous development of BIM within this sector of the construction trade. A mixed method approach was employed. To begin with, participant observations were carried out in connection to a regional development project, where managers from a selection of industrialized house-building companies assembled in order to identify key areas for development. Thereafter, interviews with managers in industrialized house-building companies were conducted to describe a state of practice within the industrialized house-building sector. Finally, a survey (n=52) was administered to employees at industrialized house-building companies on the Swedish market.

    Deducted from the observations at the meetings, the vast number of different software that are used in a large variety of different processes and the need for integration between BIM and other systems was highlighted. Discussions mostly concerned technical issues that can be explained by the fact that meetings participants were technical and development managers. The interviews gave at hand that better connection between BIM and the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is a topic that should be prioritized. The results from the survey showed that 63 per cent of the respondents have experience from working with BIM. The immediate results show similarities with previous studies of BIM use among mid-sized firms in the traditional building and construction industry regarding use frequency, perceived benefits and constraints, as well as perceived challenges. However, it is concluded that the industrialized house building sector need to adapt BIM aligned to their unique conditions in order to reap benefits, without looking too much at what is going on in the traditional construction industry.

  • 13.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Johansson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Simulation and Optimization.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Granath, Kaj
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Hellborg, Göran
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Entreprenöriell produktframtagning för industriellt byggande2014Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Challenges and critical success factors for the design phase in Swedish industrialised house building2019In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual ARCOM Conference, 2-4 September 2019, Leeds, UK / [ed] Gorse & C. J. Neilson, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2019, p. 34-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The house building industry has been characterised as less productive compared to the manufacturing industry with numerous and challenging activities including a complex integration process. For the last 20 years, industrialised house building has gained increased research and industry attention and is identified as a potential way to improve the overall house building productivity. In the overall process, the design phase has been identified as the bottleneck with several disciplines which have to be coordinated to generate a design solution that meets various customer and market requirements. Many aspects of a building's performance depend on the decisions taken in the early design process. These decisions can have a substantial impact on the overall design, lead time, cost and quality of the final product. However, there are many other important factors which need to be considered by designers during the design phase. Less attention has been paid to the identification of these factors within the design phase of the industrialised house building. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to identify challenges and outline the critical success factors to be considered in the design phase of the Swedish industrialised house building. Qualitative research was conducted in combination with literature reviews and multiple case studies linking three Swedish house building companies. Empirical data were gathered from 20 semi-structured interviews. The study identified common challenges in the house building industry and 20 critical factors that should be addressed in the design phase from both literature and practitioners view. The result shows that fixed production is crucial for identifying the critical factors rather than a building system. Also, many challenges identified from this study could be managed by developing a platform-based approach with support tools and methods for critical factors in the design phase.

  • 15.
    Thajudeen, Shamnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Impact on the Design Phase of Industrial Housing When Applying a Product Platform Approach2018In: Proceedings of 26th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction / [ed] Vicente A. González, Chennai, India, 2018, p. 527-537Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a glulam-based post-beam building system, a variety of building solutions is offered on the market for multi-story buildings. The building system must be adaptable to the demands of each project. However, short lead-time, efficient manufacturing and assembly must be ensured. The use of product platforms has been acknowledged as an enabler to manage external (customer) and internal (production) efficiency. The building system cannot be locked to a set of standard components as a high level of customisation is required. A set of methods and tools is needed to support the design work and to ensure that solutions stay inside the boundaries of the platform definition. The aim of this work is to map the state-of-practice in the design phase for a glulam building system from a platform theory perspective and outline a path forward for applying a sustainable platform development in companies where a component-based product platform does not suffice. Empirical data were gathered from an on-going product platform development including interviews and document analysis. The results show the lack of definition in platform-based product development from a theoretical perspective and need for development of support methods for design that align with different production strategies

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