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  • 1.
    Belov, Ilja
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Leisner, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessen, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Effect of fillets on heat transfer in a rheocast aluminium heatsink2016In: 2016 17th International Conference on Thermal, Mechanical and Multi-Physics Simulation and Experiments in Microelectronics and Microsystems (EuroSimE), IEEE, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of fillets formed between the base and plate fins of rheocast aluminium heatsinks on the thermal resistance of the heatsinks has been quantified by simulation. Simulation methodology, including sequential optimization has been developed in order to determine hotspot distributions where the fillets have the maximum effect. Combination of different fillet dimensions with various base thickness levels and aluminium alloys having inhomogeneous thermal conductivity have been investigated. For the studied cases, the effect of fillets on heatsink thermal resistance differs from negligible to 6%. The results would guide thermal designers on contribution of fillets to the heat transfer in multi-fin heatsinks for natural convection.

  • 2.
    Bladh, Madeleine
    et al.
    Swecast.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Dahle, Arne Kristian
    The University of Queensland.
    Shear band formation in shaped rheocast aluminium component at various plunger velocities2010In: Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China, ISSN 1003-6326, E-ISSN 2210-3384, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1749-1755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding and modelling the rheology of semi-solid metals. These models show the effects of the microstructure in terms of size and morphology of globules on the material response. More recently it has been shown that semi-solid metals can behave as compacted granular materials such as sand. A particular signature of such deformation is that the deformation becomes concentrated into shear bands which are 10-20 grains wide. Such bands have also been observed in a range of cast products. Recently, it has been clearly shown that shear bands in high pressure die cast (HPDC) products are also the results of Reynolds dilatancy. Shear bands are also known to be a common feature in semi-solid metal products. The segregation banding in semi-solid metal (SSM) material and its dependence of plunger velocity were investigated. Shaped castings were made with the RHEOMETAL™ process with a range of different plunger velocities. The microstructural characteristics were investigated, with a particular emphasis on shear bands. It is shown that ingate velocities influence the location and characteristics of the shear bands.

  • 3.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Granath, Olof
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    The effect of Si Content on the Mechanical Properties of Rheocast Al Components Using the RHEOMETAL Process2008In: Solid State Phenomena, ISSN 1012-0394, E-ISSN 1662-9779, Vol. 141-143, p. 779-784Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Characteristics of microstructure and banded defects in die-cast AM50 magnesium components2005In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has become more and more common for companies to move part of their production to low cost countries and/or closer to important markets. However, quite often the product development is not moved. The result is an increased distance between product development and production. The interface between the two departments is important to lead time, cost and quality and therefore the cooperation must work smoothly. To achieve this, most literature recommends early and tight cooperation. However this can be complicated by expensive and time consuming travels and/or usage of less rich communication such as emails and phone calls.

    It is difficult to make the transition in general from product development to production and the possible problems increase with the distance. The PD-P interface consists of several components and how a problem in one component is affected by problems in other components is not explicitly discussed in literature. The purpose in this paper is to explore if there are such connections i.e. connections between an observable problem and other components in the PD-P interface in a geographically dispersed setting. The paper does so by merging the distributed work literature and the PD-P interface literature.

    The analysis is based on four PD-P interface components; technological, organizational, scope and task. The analysis indicates that observable problems as e.g. low frequency of communication can be the symptom of one or a combination of problems. Connections between the components in the PD-P interface are exemplified in a geographically dispersed setting. Furthermore the underlying causes to the problems connected to the geographically dispersed setting in the PD-P interface are elucidated. In the case of low frequency of communication, it could be the technical system hindering communication and the different time zones disrupt it even more. Hence one symptom could be caused by different underlying problems. Each problem needs to be broken down to find the cause and the solution could be found in any of the four interface components.

    The results indicate that the actual distance is not the biggest problem but uncertainties (e.g. new collaborations) and differences (culture and work methods) which increase lead time. We have also seen that single underling problems can cause problem in several of the PD-P interface components. This indicates that if these underlying problems can be solved the project results can be vastly improved. For example, trust issues occur in the scope component (affects the willingness to share information) and in the organizational interface component (both competence trust and goodwill trust affects involvement and commitment to the project). Consequently, if problems like this can be solved many other problems will become minor problems and project objectives will be more likely to be obtained. However trust is difficult to achieve with a geographical distance between product development and production. The analysis also indicates that due to the distance more attention is paid to the PD-P interface, e.g. more experienced team members are appointed. This can be contributing to a smoother PD-P interface than expected.

  • 5.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Effect of Microstructure on Mechanical Properties of As-Cast Mg-Al Alloys2004In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 309-319Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Influence of Microstructure on Mechanical Properties in Mg-Al Casting alloys2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Mechanisms of segregation band defect formation in pressure die-cast magnesium components2005In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 488-489, p. 381-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initially, when implementing a design automation system the focus is on successfully developing a system that generates design variants based on different customer specifications, i.e. the execution of system embedded knowledge and system output. However, in the long run two important aspects are the modelling and management of the knowledge that govern the designs. The increasing emphasis to deploy a holistic view on the products properties and functions implies an increasing number of life-cycle requirements. These requirements should all be used to enhance the knowledge-base allowing for correct decisions to be made. In a system for automated variant design these life-cycle requirements have to be expressed as algorithms and/or computational statements to be intertwined with the design calculations. The number of requirements can be significantly large and they are scattered over different systems. The aim of the presented work is to provide an approach for modelling of manufacturing requirements, supporting both knowledge execution and information management, in systems for automated variant design.

  • 8.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling of Microstructure: Mechanical Property Relations in Cast Mg-Al alloys2003In: Modeling of casting, welding and advanced solidification processes - X: proceedings from the Tenth International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes held in Destin, Florida on May 25-30, 2003 / [ed] Doru Michael Stefanescu, Warrendale, Penn.: TMS , 2003, p. 165-172Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    On the mechanisms of segregation band formation and its influence on the mechanical properties of pressure die cast magnesium alloys2003In: 11. Magnesium-Abnehmerseminar: 25./26. September 2003 in Aalen = 11th Magnesium Automotive and End User Seminar, Aalen: Europ. Forschungsgemeinschaft Magnesiumguss , 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Processing effects on the morphology of semi-solid Mg alloy slurry produced by the RSFTM process2006In: Proceedings of 3rd International Conference High Tech Die Casting, AIM, Vicenza, Italy, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Segringsband i pressgjutna magnesiumkomponenter2005In: Gjuteriet, ISSN 0017-0682, Vol. 5, p. 27-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Cao, Haiping
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Granath, Olof
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Effect of injection velocity on porosity formation in rheocast Al component using RheoMetal process2010In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 158-163Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Diószegi, Attila
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Measurement and simulation of thermal condition and mechanical properties in a complicated shaped cylinder head cast in grey iron2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Diószegi, Attila
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Measurement and simulation of thermal condition and mechanical properties in a complicated shaped cylinder head cast in grey iron2001In: Indian Foundry Journal, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Esmaily, Mohsen
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mortazavi, N.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Halvarsson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Arrabal, R.
    Universidad Complutense, Spain.
    Johansson, Lars-Gunnar
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    On the microstructure and corrosion behavior of AZ91/SiC composites produced by rheocasting2016In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 180, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corrosion behavior of magnesium-aluminum (Mg-Al) alloy AM50 produced by a rheocasting (RC) technique was examined in the presence and absence of CO2 at three temperatures -4, 4 and 22 degrees C. The slurry preparation in the RC material was performed with the newly developed RheoMetal process. For reference, 99.97% Mg was included in the corrosion exposures. The influence of the microstructure on the atmospheric corrosion of alloy AM50 produced by RC and high pressure die casting (HPDC) was investigated. The RC AM50 alloy showed better corrosion resistance than HPDC AM50 in all the exposure environments studied. For both materials, there was a strong positive correlation between temperature and the atmospheric corrosion rate. The superior atmospheric corrosion behavior of RC AM50 compared to HPDC AM50 is carefully discussed in relation to differences in the as-cast microstructure. This study demonstrates that producing the alloy AM50 by this type of RC technique opens the door to Mg-Al alloys as a promising candidate for various applications where corrosion resistance is of importance.

  • 16.
    Esmaily, Mohsen
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mortazavi, Nooshin
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Halvarsson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Johansson, Lars-Gunnar
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    A new semi-solid casting technique for fabricating SiC-reinforced Mg alloys matrix composites2016In: Composites Part B: Engineering, ISSN 1359-8368, E-ISSN 1879-1069, Vol. 94, p. 176-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability of the newly developed rheocasting (RC) technique in combination with the RheoMetal process for producing SiC particulate-reinforced AM50 and AZ91D matrix composites (Mg-based MMCs) was investigated. The quality of the MMCs was studied by analyzing the fraction of casting pores, number density of SiC clusters and the uniformity of SiC particles. Solid fraction, particle size and oxidation of SiC particles had strong impacts on the overall quality of the MMCs. The MMCs produced by 40% solid fraction and oxidized micron-sized SiC particles exhibited an excellent casting quality. A low-quality MMC was obtained when non-oxidized sub-micron sized SiC particles were employed. The results showed the formation of various types intermetallic particles and carbides such as MgO, Mg2Si, Al2MgC2, Mg2C3, Al4C3 as the interfacial reaction products of SiC/Mg alloy’s melts. Mg hydride (α-MgH2) was also identified in inter-dendritic regions of the MMCs for the first time.

  • 17.
    Esmaily, Mohsen
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Nooshin
    Chalmers University of Technology,.
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    University of Technology.
    Halvarsson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Blücher, Daniel Bengtsson
    SINTEF Materials and Chemistry.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Johansson, Lars-Gunnar
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Atmospheric Corrosion of Mg Alloy AZ91D Fabricated by aSemi-Solid Casting Technique: The Influence of Microstructure2015In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 162, no 7, p. C311-C321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The atmospheric corrosion behavior of alloy AZ91D produced by a semi-solid metal (SSM) technique and by conventional high pressure die casting (HPDC) was investigated for up to 1176 hours in the laboratory. Alloy AZ91D in the SSM state was fabricated using a rheocasting (RC) technique in which the slurry was prepared by the RheoMetal process. Exposures were performed in 95% RH air at 22 and 4 degrees C. The RC alloy AZ91D exhibited significantly better corrosion resistance than the HPDC material at two temperatures studied. The effect of casting technology on corrosion is explained in terms of the microstructural differences between the materials. For example, the larger number density of cathodic beta phase particles in the HPDC material initially causes relatively rapid corrosion compared to the RC material. During later stages of corrosion, the more network-like beta phase particles in the RC alloy act as a corrosion barrier, further improving the relative corrosion resistance of the RC material.

  • 18.
    Esmaily, Mohsen
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mortazavi, Seyedeh
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Shahabi-Navid, Mehrdad
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    University of Technology.
    Halvarsson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Nyborg, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Johansson, Lars-Gunnar
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Effect of Rheocasting on Corrosion of AM50 Mg Alloy2015In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 162, no 3, p. C85-C95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corrosion behavior of magnesium-aluminum (Mg-Al) alloy AM50 produced by a rheocasting (RC) technique was examined in the presence and absence of CO2 at three temperatures -4, 4 and 22 degrees C. The slurry preparation in the RC material was performed with the newly developed RheoMetal process. For reference, 99.97% Mg was included in the corrosion exposures. The influence of the microstructure on the atmospheric corrosion of alloy AM50 produced by RC and high pressure die casting (HPDC) was investigated. The RC AM50 alloy showed better corrosion resistance than HPDC AM50 in all the exposure environments studied. For both materials, there was a strong positive correlation between temperature and the atmospheric corrosion rate. The superior atmospheric corrosion behavior of RC AM50 compared to HPDC AM50 is carefully discussed in relation to differences in the as-cast microstructure. This study demonstrates that producing the alloy AM50 by this type of RC technique opens the door to Mg-Al alloys as a promising candidate for various applications where corrosion resistance is of importance.

  • 19.
    Granath, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Cao, Haiping
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Determining the effect of slurry process parameters on semisolid A356 alloy microstructures produced by the RheoMetalTM process2008In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 349-356Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Granath, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Cao, Haiping
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Porosity reduction possibilities in commercial Aluminium A380 and Magnesium AM60 alloy components using the RheoMetal process. Metallurgical Science and Technology2010In: Metallurgical Science and Technology, ISSN 0393-6074, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 2-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Granath, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Cao, Haiping
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Porosity reduction possibilities in commercial aluminium A380 and magnesium AM60 alloy components using the RheoMetalTM process2008In: Proceedings of 4th international conference High Tech Die Casting, AIM: Montchiari (Brescia), Italy 9-10 April 2008, Milano, Italy.: Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Jarfors, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Rigovacca, Diego
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jansson, Per
    COMPtech.
    Influence of process parameters on surface appearance and roughness of a low Si containing Al-alloy, in semisolid casting2015In: Solid State Phenomena, ISSN 1012-0394, E-ISSN 1662-9779, Vol. 217-218, p. 318-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The visual appearance and surface roughness were experimentally investigated inindustrial scale for a low silicon containing aluminium alloy cast in semisolid state integrated withHPDC machine. A visual comparative technique and surface roughness in the form of the Rq valuewere used to evaluate the surface appearance and the surface roughness respectively. The resultswere investigated statistically to find significant models. It was shown that high quality appearance,following a comparative scale, was possible using high die temperature and high injection speed. Itwas also found that improving the surface roughness will deteriorate the visual appearance.

  • 23. Källbom, Rikard
    et al.
    Hamberg, K
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Björkegren, L-E
    On the solidification sequence of ductile iron castings containing chunky graphite2005In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 413-414, p. 346-351Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    König, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Influence of alloying elements on microstructure and mechanical properties of CGI2010In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 97-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of alloying elements and cooling conditions on compacted graphite iron is investigated. To investigate the influence of different alloying elements a sampling cup, designed for thermal analysis, and tensile test bars were cast. A total of 19 casting trials were performed and for each of the trials three different cooling conditions were studied for both the sampling cup and the tensile test bars. Mg has a major influence on the graphite morphology and causes a substantial increase in nodularity. Cu, Si and Sn only cause minor changes in the nodularity, but on the other hand affect the mechanical properties primarily by altering the pearlite content of the material. Cr and Mo are investigated mainly with respect to their carbide promoting properties. However, no columnar white structure was found in the microstructure. The relationship between the microstructure and the thermal history caused by differences in alloying content is also studied.

  • 25.
    König, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    The influence of copper on microstructure and mechanical properties of compacted graphite iron2009In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 22, no 1-4, p. 164-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of copper content (0.26 to 1.31 wt-%) on microstructure formation and mechanicalproperties of compacted graphite iron (CGI) has been evaluated through standard metallographicanalysis, colour etching techniques and tensile testing of machined test bars. Theproperties investigated are yield strength, tensile strength and elongation. The castings weremade in an industrial environment from a combination of CGI returns, pig iron, cast iron- and steelscrap. A total of four heats were cast in specially designed sampling cups (3 different coolingrates), chill wedges as well as tensile test bars machined from sand moulded cylinders (20, 45and 85 mm in diameter). The results clearly illustrate the combined effect of copper and coolingrate on nodularity, chilling tendency as well as pearlite content. A discussion concerning the effectof graphite morphology on the ferrite growth is also included.

  • 26.
    König, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    The Influence of Copper on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of CGI2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    König, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Svensson, Ingvar L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Modeling of Ferrite Growth in Compacted Graphite Iron2009In: Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes - XII, Warrendale, Pennsylvania, USA: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) , 2009, p. 505-512Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work the ferrite growth in Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI) has been modeled. The relative amounts of ferrite and pearlite are of vital importance for the mechanical properties of cast iron. Thus, the possibility to predict the matrix microstructure in CGI by means of simulation would be an indispensable tool for foundries and design engineers. The increasing use of CGI, especially for automotive applications, further creates a need for this research.

     

    This study shows that graphite in CGI grows in cells similar to eutectic grey iron cells. In cast irons the ferrite nucleates on the graphite and thereafter grows around the graphite particles until the formation of pearlite interrupts further ferrite formation. The complexity of the graphite particles in CGI imply that the ferrite will grow in different stages. A microstructure study of CGI reveals that ferrite nucleates on compacted graphite particles where low amounts of pearlite stabilizing elements can be found. Growth of ferrite then proceeds until it impinges with ferrite nucleated on adjacent graphite particles. Further ferrite growth takes place radially away from the center of the CGI cell until pearlite nucleation interrupts its growth. At some point during this process ferrite nucleates on graphite nodules in the last to freeze areas of the microstructure giving a contribution to the ferrite content. In the present work growth models of ferrite in nodular cast iron are adapted to CGI.

  • 28.
    König, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Svensson, Ingvar L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    The Influence of alloying elements on Chill Formation in CGI2010In: Science and processing of cast iron IX: selected peer reviewed papers from the Ninth International Symposium on Science and Processing of Cast Iron, Luxor-Egypt, November 10-13, 2010 / [ed] Nofal, A. and Waly, M., Stafa-Zürich: Trans Tech Publications , 2010, p. 126-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of alloying elements on the chill formation in Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI) is investigated. Chill wedges cast in an industrial foundry were used to investigate the chill formation. A total number of 19 chemical compositions were studied, including three trials of varying nodularity treatment level; four trials of varying copper content; four trials of varying silicon content; four trials of varying tin content and four trials of varying carbide promoter content. Three wedges were cast for each alloy composition, of which one was used for measuring the temperature at three different heights in the wedge.

    Contrary to some previous reports, the results indicate that low-nodularity CGI is not more prone to chill formation (columnar white) than high-nodularity CGI. Trends regarding the effect of alloying elements on chill formation are shown to generally be in agreement with previous work on spheroidal graphite iron and lamellar graphite iron. Most of the samples also show carbide formation in centre line areas of the wedge (inverse chill), this occurrence is also discussed in the paper.

     

  • 29.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. RheoMetal.
    Effect of Material Inhomogeneity on Thermal Performance of a Rheocast Aluminum Heatsink for Electronics Cooling2016In: Journal of materials engineering and performance (Print), ISSN 1059-9495, E-ISSN 1544-1024, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 2116-2127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between microstructural inhomogeneity and thermal conductivity of a rheocast componentmanufactured from two different aluminum alloys was investigated. The formation of two different primarya-Al particles was observed and related to multistage solidification process during slurry preparationand die cavity filling process. The microstructural inhomogeneity of the component was quantified as thefraction of a1-Al particles in the primary Al phase. A high fraction of coarse solute-lean a1-Al particles inthe primary Al phase caused a higher thermal conductivity of the component in the near-to-gate region. Avariation in thermal conductivity through the rheocast component of 10% was discovered. The effect of aninhomogeneous temperature-dependent thermal conductivity on the thermal performance of a largerheocast heatsink for electronics cooling in an operation environment was studied by means of simulation.Design guidelines were developed to account for the thermal performance of heatsinks with inhomogeneousthermal conductivity, as caused by the rheocasting process. Under the modeling assumptions, the simulationresults showed over 2.5% improvement in heatsink thermal resistance when the higher conductivity nearto-gate region was located at the top of the heatsink. Assuming homogeneous thermo-physical properties ina rheocast heatsink may lead to greater than 3.5% error in the estimation of maximum thermal resistanceof the heatsink. The variation in thermal conductivity within a large rheocast heatsink was found to beimportant for obtaining of a robust component design.

  • 30.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders E. W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Solidification sequence and evolution of microstructure during rheocasting of four Al-Si-Mg-Fe alloys with Low Si content2016In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 1215-1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Al-Si-Mg-Fe alloys with Si contents varying from 1.6 to 4.5 wt pct were rheocast, using the RheoMetal™ process to prepare slurry and cast in a vertical high-pressure die casting machine. Particle size and Si concentration in the α-Al particles in the slurry and in the as-rheocast component were investigated. A uniform distribution of Si in the globular α 1-Al particles was achieved in the slurry. In the rheocast samples, measurement of the α 1-Al particles showed that these particles did not increase significantly in size during pouring and secondary solidification. The two additional α-Al particles types, α 2-Al particles and α 3-Al particles, were identified as being a result of two discrete nucleation events taking place after slurry production. The Si concentration in the α 2-Al and α 3-Al particles indicated that the larger α 2-Al particles precipitated before the α 3-Al particles. In addition, in the as-rheocast condition, the Si distribution inside the α 1-Al particles showed three distinct zones; an unaffected zone, a transition zone, and in some cases the start of a dendritic/cellular zone. The phenomenon of dendritic growth of globular α 1-Al particles during secondary solidification occurred concomitantly with the final eutectic reaction and increased with increasing amount of the Al-Si eutectic phase.

  • 31.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting. RheoMetal.
    The effect of microstructural inhomogeneity on thermal diffusivity in a rheocast component2016In: La Metallurgia Italiana, ISSN 0026-0843, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between microstructural characteristics and thermal diffusivity of a rheocast component was investigated for two Al-Si-Mg-Fe alloys with low Si contents. The microstructural investigation of the components clearly depicted the formation of coarse solute-lean globular α1-Al particles during the slurry fabrication process and fine solute-rich α2-Al and α3-Al particles during the secondary solidification in the die cavity. The microstructural characterization was quantified based on the amount of α1-Al particles in different locations of the component. The result clearly revealed a presence of both longitudinal and transverse macrosegregation of solute-lean α1-Al particles in the rheocast component. The study of thermal diffusivity and hardness revealed that the regions of the component with a high fraction of α1-Al particles had a higher thermal diffusivity but a lower hardness. Silicon in the solid solution was observed to be a critical factor in reducing the thermal diffusivity. The comparison between the effect of longitudinal and transverse segregation on thermal diffusivity showed that the transverse segregation had a stronger impact.

  • 32.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessen, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Effect of superheat on melting rate of EEM of Al alloys during stirring using the RheoMetal process2013In: Solid State Phenomena, ISSN 1012-0394, E-ISSN 1662-9779, Vol. 192-193, p. 392-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The RheoMetal process (previously called the Rapid S- and RSF- process) is a novelmethod to produce cost effective, high quality, semisolid slurries for component casting. TheRheoMetal process uses an Enthalpy Exchange Material (EEM) as cooling agent to absorb heat andproduce a slurry. Critical process parameters to create a slurry by robust melting of the EEM arealloy content, stirring speed, EEM to melt ratio, EEM temperature, EEM microstructuralcharacteristics and melt superheat.In this paper, the melting sequence and melting rate of the EEM was studied experimentally. Theeffect of EEM composition, as well as superheat, on evolution of shape and dimension of the EEMduring stirring was investigated. Initial material freezing onto the EEM was observed, followed by astationary phase with subsequent gradual melting of the EEM. It was shown that the characteristicsof freeze-on layer were strongly correlated to melt superheat, EEM temperature, as well as materialcomposition, hence also has significant influence on the melting sequence.

  • 33.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Influence of Microstructural Inhomogeneity on Fracture Behaviour in SSM-HPDC Al-Si-Cu-Fe Component with Low Si Content2015In: Solid State Phenomena, ISSN 1012-0394, E-ISSN 1662-9779, Vol. 217-218, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current paper, a low-Si aluminium alloy (1.4-2.4% Si) was used to fabricate acomplex shape telecom component using Semi-Solid High-Pressure Die Cast (SSM-HPDC),process. Microstructure and fracture characteristics were investigated. The cast material exhibitedmicrostructural inhomogeneity, in particular macrosegregation in the form of liquid surfacesegregation bands in addition to sub-surface pore bands and gross centre porosity. Tensilespecimens were taken from the cast components. Elongation and microstructural inhomogeneitywere investigated and correlated. Fracture surfaces of the tensile specimen were examined underscanning electron microscope (SEM). The study showed that both near surface liquid segregationbands and subsurface porosity strongly affected the fracture behaviour. Dominant for loss ofductility was gross centre porosity. The centre porosity was found to be a combination of trappedgas and insufficient, irregular feeding patterns.

  • 34.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Sabzevar, Mohsen H.
    Department of Materials Engineering Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Solidification and re-melting phenomena during the slurry preparation stage using the RheoMetalTM process2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The melting sequence of the Enthalpy Exchange Material (EEM) and formation of slurry in the RheoMetalTM process was investigated. The EEM was extracted, together with a portion of the slurry at different times before complete melting, and quenched. The EEM initially increased in size due to melt freezing onto its surface, forming a freeze-on layer. The initial growth of this layer was followed by a constant diameter of the EEM and thereafter subsequent melting. Microstructural characterization of the size and morphology of different phases in the EEM and the freeze-on layer was made. Dendritic equiaxed grains and eutectic regions containing Si particles and Cu-bearing particles were observed in the as-cast EEM. The freeze-on layer consisted of dendritic aluminum slightly tilted by about 30° toward the upstream direction, caused by the rotation of the EEM. Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy analysis showed that the freeze-on layer had a composition corresponding to a higher melting point than the EEM.

    Microstructural investigation of the EEM showed that the temperature rapidly increased to 495 ºC, causing incipient melting of Al2Cu and Al5Mg8Si6Cu2 phases in grain boundary regions. Following the incipient melting, the temperature in the EEM increased further and binary Al-Si eutectic started to melt to form a region of a fully developed coherent mushy state. Experimental results and a thermal model indicated that as the dendrites spheroidized and the interface at the EEM/freeze-on layer reached a mushy state with 25% solid fraction, coherency was lost and disintegration of the freeze-on layer took place. Subsequently, in the absence of the shielding effect from the freeze-on Layer, the EEM disintegrates at a higher solid fraction, estimated to be 50%. The fast and complex slurry generation in the RheoMetalTM process is a hybrid process with both rheocasting and thixocasting elements in the process.

  • 35.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Sabzevar, Mohsen Haddad
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Solidification and re-melting phenomena during slurry preparation using the RheoMetal™ process2017In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 48, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The melting sequence of the enthalpy exchange material (EEM) and formation of a slurry in the RheoMetal™ process was investigated. The EEM was extracted and quenched, together with a portion of the slurry at different processing times before complete melting. The EEM initially increased in size/diameter due to melt freezing onto its surface, forming a freeze-on layer. The initial growth of this layer was followed by a period of a constant diameter of the EEM with subsequent melting and decrease of diameter. Microstructural characterization of the size and morphology of different phases in the EEM and in the freeze-on layer was made. Dendritic equiaxed grains and eutectic regions containing Si particles and Cu-bearing particles and Fe-rich particles were observed in the as-cast EEM. The freeze-on layer consisted of dendritic aluminum tilted by about 30 deg in the upstream direction, caused by the rotation of the EEM. Energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis showed that the freeze-on layer had a composition corresponding to an alloy with higher melting point than the EEM and thus shielding the EEM from the surrounding melt. Microstructural changes in the EEM showed that temperature rapidly increased to 768 K (495 °C), indicated by incipient melting of the lowest temperature melting eutectic in triple junction grain boundary regions with Al2Cu and Al5Mg8Si6Cu2 phases present. As the EEM temperature increased further the binary Al-Si eutectic started to melt to form a region of a fully developed coherent mushy state. Experimental results and a thermal model indicated that as the dendrites spheroidized near to the interface at the EEM/freeze-on layer reached a mushy state with 25 pct solid fraction, coherency was lost and disintegration of the freeze-on layer took place. Subsequently, in the absence of the shielding effect from the freeze-on Layer, the EEM continued to disintegrate with a coherency limit of a solid fraction estimated to be 50 pct.

  • 36.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Sjölander, Emma
    Scania CV AB, Materials Technology, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Influence of microstructure and heat treatment on thermal conductivity of rheocast and liquid die cast Al-6Si-2Cu-Zn alloy2016In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 202-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal conductivity of a rheocast component made from Stenal Rheo1 (Al-6Si-2Cu-Zn) alloy was investigated in as-cast, T5 and T6 conditions. The thermal conductivity measurement in different locations showed variation of this property throughout the rheocast component. The results of microstructural investigation revealed that the ratio of solute-lean α1-Al particles formed during slurry preparation to fine solute-rich α2-Al particles formed during secondary solidification had significant influence on thermal conductivity. The reduced amount of solutes in the α1-Al particles was determined as the root cause of higher thermal conductivity. A linear relation between the fraction of precipitates and the increase in thermal conductivity was obtained and silicon in solid solution is shown to have a dominant influence. As silicon was precipitated during the heat treatment, thermal conductivity increased. For an optimal combination of thermal and mechanical properties, it is therefore important to use an ageing temperature above the temperature of Si precipitation.

  • 37. Schneider, Marc
    et al.
    Schaefer, Wilfred
    Mazourkevitch, G.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Component Technology.
    Svensson, Ingvar L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Component Technology.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Component Technology.
    Prediction of Microstructure and Microporosity Development in Aluminium Gravity Casting Processes2005In: Proc. SFB Kolloquium, RWTH, Aachen, 2005., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initially, when implementing a design automation system the focus is on successfully developing a system that generates design variants based on different customer specifications, i.e. the execution of system embedded knowledge and system output. However, in the long run two important aspects are the modelling and management of the knowledge that govern the designs. The increasing emphasis to deploy a holistic view on the products properties and functions implies an increasing number of life-cycle requirements. These requirements should all be used to enhance the knowledge-base allowing for correct decisions to be made. In a system for automated variant design these life-cycle requirements have to be expressed as algorithms and/or computational statements to be intertwined with the design calculations. The number of requirements can be significantly large and they are scattered over different systems. The aim of the presented work is to provide an approach for modelling of manufacturing requirements, supporting both knowledge execution and information management, in systems for automated variant design.

  • 38. Schneider, Mark
    et al.
    Schaefer, Willfreid
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Olsson, Jörgen
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Beckmann, Christofer
    Prediction of Microstructure and Microporosity Development in Aluminium Gravity Casting Processes2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Svensson, Ingvar L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Use of simulation to predict microstructure and mechanical properties in an as-cast aluminium cylinder head: comparison with experiments2007In: Metallurgical Science & Technology, ISSN 0393-6074, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 7-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Sjögren, Torsten
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Svensson, Ingvar L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wilfried, Schäfer
    Modeling and Simulation of Elastic Properties in Cast Compacted Graphite Iron Engine Block2006In: Modeling of casting, welding, and advanced solidification: Proceedings from the Eleventh International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes; Opio; France; 28 May-2 June 2006, Warrendale, Pa.: TMS-Minerals, Metals & Materials Society , 2006, p. 685-692Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Sjölander, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Payandeh, Mostafa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, A. E. W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Wessén, M.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Thermal conductivity of liquid cast and rheocast telecom component using Al-6Si-2Cu-Zn (Stenal Rheo 1) in as-cast and heat treated condition2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal conductivity of a rheocast telecom component produced using Al-6Si-2Cu-Zn alloy (Stenal Rheo 1) was investigated in the as-cast, T5 and T6 conditions. Conventionally liquid cast samples were produced in a permanent mold and used as a reference material. In the rheocast component in as-cast condition, a thermal conductivity of 153 W/mK at room temperature were measured. A T5 treatment at 250 or 300°C increased thermal conductivity to 174 W/mK. A T6 treatment resulted in further increase in thermal conductivity to 182 W/mK. The liquid cast alloy exhibited a lower thermal conductivity and a higher hardness for all conditions compared to the as-rheocast component.The microstructure of rheocast component showed material consisted of relatively large α1-Al particles formed during the slurry fabrication process and fine α2-Al particles formed in the die cavity. The macrosegregation in the form of the different ration of the primary α1-Al particles to secondary α2-Al particles in different positions of the rheocast component was observed. The relation between microstructural characteristics and thermal diffusivity was investigated by determining the local thermal conductivity in the rheocast component and ration of α1-Al particles to α2-Al particles. The results revealed that samples from the regions of the component with a high amount of α1-Al particles had a higher thermal conductivity. WDS measurement results pointed to that Si and Cu concentration in the α1-Al particles contained lower concentrations value compare to the α2-Al particles and therefore α1-Al particles has higher value for thermal conductivity.Silicon precipitation was confirmed using calorimetry and dilatometry to take place between 200 and 250°C. A linear relation between the fraction of Si precipitates formed and the increase in thermal diffusivity was obtained. Silicon in solid solution is shown to have a strong influence (negative) on thermal conductivity. When the silicon is precipitated by heat treatment the thermal conductivity increases. For an optimal combination of thermal and mechanical properties it is therefore important to use an ageing temperature above the temperature for Si precipitation.

  • 42.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Foundry of cast irons: Process and simulation2001In: Numerical Simulation of Foundry processes / [ed] Franco Bonollo and Stefano Odorizzi, 2001Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Gjutningssimulering ger kortare ledtider och bättre gjutgods1997In: Mekanisten, ISSN 0284-9763, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Integration of  Casting Process and Microstructure Modelling in an Industrial Nodular Iron Casting by Computer Simulation1997In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, Vol. 4-5, p. 535-542Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling and measurements of densities at solidification of magnesium cast alloys2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling of microstructure formation in cast iron1998In: Modeling of casting, welding and advanced solidification processes VIII: proceedings of the eighth International Conference on Modeling of Casting and Welding Processes, held in San Diego, California on June 7-12, 1998 / [ed] Brian G. Thomas and Christoph Beckermann, Warrendale, Pa.: TMS, cop. , 1998, p. 443-454Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling of Structure and Hardness in Nodular Cast Iron Castings at Different Silicon Contents1993In: Modeling of casting, welding and advanced solidification processes - VI: proceedings of the sith conference in a series on Modeling Casting and Welding Processes, held in Palm Coast, Florida, March 21-26, 1993 / [ed] T.S. Piwonka, V. Voller, L. Katgerman, Warrendale, Pa.: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society , 1993, p. 26-36Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Simulation of Mechanical Properties in Cast Iron Castings1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Wassén, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    Cao, Haiping
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting.
    The Effect of Mould Constraints on the 0.2% Proof Stress of As-Cast Mg-Al Alloys2005In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 488-489, p. 165-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mapping of fatigue crack growth rates in thick plates of a high strength aluminium alloy has been done. The plate thicknesses investigated was 100, 150 and 200 mm. In this work, material from near edge at near surface and mid-thickness has been investigated. Measurements of crack length has been performed using DC potential drop. Cyclic condensation is used in order to reveal crack growth behaviour for stage I and the earlier part of stage II crack growth. Influence of crack closure, crack branching and slow growing side cracks on fatigue crack growth rate of S-L and L-T oriented specimens are discussed. Variation of difference in growth rate in the upper part of the stage II growth between near surface and mid thickness positioned L-T specimens are found to vary with plate thickness.

  • 50.
    Wessén, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and Manufacturing - Casting. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Mechanical Engineering.
    Beräkningar med Thermo-Calc av fasjämvikter för legeringssystem närliggande aluminiumlegeringen AlSi9Cu3Fe2001Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 79
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