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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Magnusson, Anette
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Bülow, Per
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Psychological stress affects the numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- cells and induce an immune response towards type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens in young women2016Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Cherfan, Pierre
    et al.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Jonasson, Lena
    Effects of simvastatin on human T cells in vivo2007In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 193, no 1, p. 186-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Fryk, Emanuel
    et al.
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wilsson, Åsa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW).
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW).
    Jansson, Per-Anders
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Department of Life Sciences, Division of Systems and Synthetic Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Galectin-1 correlates with inflammatory markers and T regulatory cells in children with type 1 diabetes and/or celiac disease2024In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 215, no 3, p. 240-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CeD) are common autoimmune diseases in children where the pathophysiology is not fully characterized. The autoimmune process involves a complex scenario of both inflammatory and regulatory features. Galectin-1 (GAL-1) has a wide range of biological activities e.g., interaction with immune cells. We examined the relationship between GAL-1 and soluble immune markers and T cell subsets in a cohort of children with T1D and/or CeD relative to healthy children. Galectin-1, together with several soluble immune markers (e g interleukins (IL)), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), acute phase proteins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) were measured in sera from children with T1D and/or CeD by fluorochrome (Luminex) technique using children without these diseases as a reference. Subgroups of T cells, including T regulatory (Treg) cells, were analyzed by flow cytometry. Association between GAL-1, pro-inflammatory markers and Treg cells differed depending on which illness combination was present. In children with both T1D and CeD, GAL-1 correlated positively with pro-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, -6 and TNF-α). Composite scores increased the strength of correlation between GAL-1 and pro-inflammatory markers, Th1-associated interferon (IFN)-γ, and T1D-associated visfatin. Contrary, in children diagnosed with exclusively T1D, GAL-1 was positively correlated to CD25hi and CD25hiCD101+ Treg cells. For children with only CeD, no association between GAL-1 and other immune markers was observed. In conclusion, the association observed between GAL-1, soluble immune markers and Treg cells may indicate a role for GAL-1 in the pathophysiology of T1D and, to some extent, also in CeD.

  • 4. Hyland, Paul
    et al.
    Duggan, Orla
    Turbitt, Julie
    Coulter, James
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Barnett, Christopher
    Barnett, Yvonne
    Nonagenarians from the Swedish NONA Immune Study have increased plasma antioxidant capacity and similar levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared to younger control subjects2002In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 37, no 2-3, p. 465-473Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Jonasson, L
    et al.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Expansion of peripheral CD8+ T cells in patients with coronary artery disease: relation to cytomegalovirus infection.2003In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 254, no 5, p. 472-478Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Nijm, Johnny
    et al.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Olsson, Anders G
    Jonasson, Lena
    Circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil-platelet aggregates in patients with coronary artery disease.2005In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 452-456Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Ross, Owen A.
    et al.
    Hyland, Paul
    Curran, Martin D.
    McIlhatton, Brian P.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Boo
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Pawelec, Graham
    Barnett, Christopher R.
    Middleton, Derek
    Barnett, Yvonne A.
    Mitochondrial DNA damage in lymphocytes: a role in immunosenescence?2002In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 37, no 2-3, p. 329-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An age-related increase of DNA damage/mutation has been previously reported in human lymphocytes. The high copy number and mutation rate make the mtDNA genome an ideal candidate for assessing damage and to act as a potential biomarker of ageing. In the present study, two assays were developed to evaluate the level of mtDNA4977 and the accumulation of point mutations with age. A competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology incorporating three primers was used to detect and quantify the levels of mtDNA4977 and a novel heteroduplex reference strand conformational analysis (RSCA) technique was used to analyse the accumulation of point mutations. The assays were applied to an in vitro model of T cell ageing and ex vivo DNA samples from an elderly cohort of subjects and a younger control group. The mtDNA4977 was detected in all the DNA samples examined but only a very low concentration was observed and no age-related increase or accumulation was observed. No accumulation of point mutations was identified using RSCA within the T cell clones as they were aged or the ex vivo lymphocytes from the elderly cohort. A higher level of variation was observed within the ex vivo DNA samples, verifying the high resolution of RSCA and its ability to identify different mtDNA species, although no correlation with age was observed. The low level of mtDNA damage observed with respect to the ex vivo lymphocyte DNA samples within this study may be due in part to the high turnover of blood cells/mtDNA, which may inhibit the accumulation of genetically abnormal mtDNA that may play a role in immunosenescence. A similar explanation may also apply to the in vitro model of T cell ageing if the vast majority of the cells are replicating rather than entering senescence.

  • 8.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Pinpointing biomarkers of importance for children with combined type 1 diabetes and celiac disease2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. The diseases also share the same risk genes, and thereby patients have an increased risk of developing the other disease subsequently. The pattern of peripheral T and B cell subsets and soluble immune markers (cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, adipocytokines and matrix metalloproteinases) are not yet well characterized in children with a combination of the common pediatric immunological disorders, T1D and celiac disease. To better understand the complex pathophysiology, it is important to gain a deeper knowledge of alterations present in the peripheral immune profile in children with these autoimmune diseases. Pinpointing biomarkers, e.g. peripheral immune markers, can hopefully contribute to the improvement of prognosis, diagnosis, and disease management. Flow cytometry is useful for studying different immune cells, but several pre-analytical factors may affect the outcome. In order to generate reliable results, it is important to evaluate the impact of different pre-analytical factors that possibly can lead to in vitro alterations of the immune cells.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase our knowledge of peripheral immune marker patterns in children with a combined diagnosis of T1D and celiac disease, with a focus on T and B cell subsets and soluble immune markers; by immunological methods evaluated and adapted for this purpose.

    Methods: This thesis comprises methodological and cross-sectional studies. The methodological studies are based on whole blood collected from sixty blood donors to examine the impact of pre-analytical factors (anticoagulant, sample handling time, isolation and cryopreservation) that may affect the immune cells (Study I, II). The cross-sectional studies include blood samples collected from a total of 103 participants (children with T1D and/or celiac disease or no diagnosis at all). The pattern of peripheral B (Study II) and T (Study III) cell subsets were examined by flow cytometry. Nearly thirty soluble immune markers were quantified in serum by Luminex technology (Study IV).

    Results: Peripheral lymphocytes were stable in whole blood samples up to 24 hours, regardless of the anticoagulant. Generally, T and B cell subsets were not affected by isolation and cryopreservation. Children with combined T1D and celiac disease had higher percentages of terminally differentiated memory T helper cells, lower percentages of effector memory T cytotoxic cells and lower expression of suppressive immune markers on regulatory T cells compared with the other study groups. Further, children with combined T1D and celiac disease had a higher percentage of memory B and lower percentages of naive B cells than children with either T1D or celiac disease. Contrary, children with single diagnoses had an inverted naive/memory B cell pattern compared to children with combined diagnoses. Several of the "classical" (cytokines, chemokines), as well as "non-classical" (acute phase proteins, adipocytokines, matrix metalloproteinases) immune markers, were lower in children with combined diagnoses compared to the other study groups.

    Conclusions: Based on our results, we conclude that whole blood samples stored up to 24 hours are feasible for flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte subsets, regardless of the type of anticoagulant. Further, isolated and cryopreserved immune cells are feasible for flow cytometric analysis of T and B cell subsets. Impairment in the T and B cells mediated immune regulation in children with combined T1D and celiac disease seems to be clearly divergent from those seen in children with exclusively one of these two autoimmune diseases. Children with combined T1D and celiac disease appear to have a suppressed immune profile, including "classical" and "non-classical" immune markers. The methodological studies provide deeper knowledge of how reliable results can be obtained in studies of peripheral immune cells, e.g., in children with autoimmune diseases. The knowledge obtained by this thesis also brings a better understanding of the pattern of peripheral immune markers in T1D and/or celiac disease. This could potentially contribute to promoting the improvement of prognosis, diagnosis, and disease management.

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  • 9.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Subsets of CD4+, CD8+ and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Characterization of B cell subsets in children with type 1 diabetes and/or celiac diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Division of Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Department of Life Sciences, Division of Systems and Synthetic Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shift in the B-cell subsets between children with type 1 diabetes and/or celiac disease2023In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose was to characterize the pattern of B-cell subsets in children with a combined diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (C) since children with single or double diagnosis of these autoimmune diseases may differ in peripheral B-cell subset phenotype patterns.

    B-cells were analyzed with flow cytometry for the expression of differentiation/maturation markers to identify transitional, naive and memory B-cells. Transitional (CD24hiCD38hiCD19+) and memory Bregs (CD24hiCD27+CD19+, CD1d+CD27+CD19+, CD5+CD1d+CD19+) were classified as B-cells with regulatory capacity.

    Children with a combined diagnosis of T1D and C showed a pattern of diminished peripheral B-cell subsets. The B-cells compartment in children with combined diagnosis had higher percentages of memory B subsets and Bregs, including activated subsets, compared to children with either T1D or C. Children with combined diagnosis had a lower percentage of naive B-cells (CD27-CD19+; IgD+CD19+) and an increased percentage of memory B-cells (CD27+CD19+; IgD-CD19+). A similar alteration was seen among the CD39+ expressing naive and memory B cells. Memory Bregs (CD1d+CD27+CD19+) were more frequent, contrary to the lower percentage of CD5+ transitional Bregs in children with a combined diagnosis. In children with either T1D or C, the peripheral B-cell compartment was dominated by naive cells.

    Differences in the pattern of heterogenous peripheral B-cell repertoire subsets reflect a shifting in the B-cell compartment between children with T1D and/or C. This is an immunological challenge of impact for the pathophysiology of these autoimmune diseases.

  • 12.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson-Bowers, Anette
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi Lymphocytes Are in General Not Influenced by Isolation and Long-Term Cryopreservation2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 6, p. 1799-1809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several key factors can affect the outcome of immunological studies; isolation/cryopreservation can possibly alter T, B, NK, and T-regulatory (Treg) cell marker expression patterns. Blood samples from 50 blood donors supplemented with Na-heparin or K2EDTA were handled within 4 and 24 h after blood sampling. PBMC were isolated with different density gradients. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular and extracellular CD markers was performed on blood samples freshly isolated PBMC, and PBMC was thawed 6 and 12 mo post-cryopreservation for the purpose of identifying B, NK, Th, T-cytotoxic, and Treg cells. No differences were observed in the percentages for CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, or CD56+CD16+ cells within 24 h of sampling regardless of which supplement or isolation techniques were used. Differentiated (diff) CD4+ cells were in general less affected by isolation and cryopreservation than diff CD8+ cells. Terminally diff effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not affected by either isolation of lymphocytes or cryopreservation. In contrast, naive and early-diff effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ cells were affected by isolation and cryopreservation. The percentages of Treg cells defined as CD4+CD25hi expressing CD101 or CD129, CD4+CD25hiCD127, and CD4+CD25hiCD127FOXP3+, respectively, remained stable after isolation and cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD127, with or without FOXP3, were not affected by isolation/cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD39, contrary to CD45RA, on CD4+CD25+CD127 cells with or without FOXP3 were not affected by either isolation or cryopreservation. In conclusion, subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation.

  • 13.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Division of Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Department of Pediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Suppressed immune profile in children with combined type 1 diabetes and celiac disease2020In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 201, no 3, p. 244-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children diagnosed with a combination of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) show a dysregulated T helper (Th) 1/Th17 response. Besides the cellular involvement, several soluble immune markers are involved in the autoimmune process of both T1D and CD. Only few studies have examined the peripheral pattern of different cytokines, chemokines, and acute phase proteins (APP) in children with combined T1D and CD. To our knowledge no studies have evaluated the serum levels of adipocytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this context. The purpose of the present study was to acquire more knowledge and to gain deeper understanding on peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children with both T1D and CD. The study included children diagnosed with both T1D and CD (n=18), children with T1D (n=27) or CD (n=16), and reference children (n=42). Sera were collected and analysis of twenty-eight immune markers (cytokines, chemokines, APPs, adipocytokines and MMPs) was performed with Luminex technique. The major findings showed that children with double diagnosis had lower serum levels of interleukin (IL)-22, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MIP)-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, procalcitonin, fibrinogen, visfatin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. These results indicate a suppressed immune profile in children with combined T1D and CD, including Th17 cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, adipocytokines and MMPs. We conclude that besides cytokines and chemokines, other immune markers, e.g. APPs, adipocytokines and MMPs, are of importance for further investigations to elucidate the heterogeneous immune processes present in patients diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD.

  • 14.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Division of Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Department of Pediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Suppressed immune profile in children with type 1 diabetes in combination with celiac disease2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins (APP), adipocytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in different pathophysiological processes of inflammatory character. The role of the different immune markers and the peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in combination with celiac disease (CD) is not fully understood and is not well studied. The purpose of the present study was therefore to acquire more knowledge and to gain deeper understanding on peripheral immunoregulatory milieu in children with T1D and/or CD.

    Methods: The study included children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD (n=18), children with T1D (n=27) or CD (n=16), and reference children (n=42).

    Blood samples were collected, and serum stored in -80°C until analysis, avoiding multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The inflammatory cyto/chemokines (IL-1β, -5, -6, -8, -9, -10, -13, -15, -17A, -22, -25, -33, IFN-γ, TNF-α, G-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β), diabetes related immune markers (visfatin, resistin), APP (procalcitonin (PTC), ferritin, tissue protein activator, fibrinogen, serum amyloid A) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -2, -3) were analyzed with Luminex technique using Bio-Plex assays. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify similarities/differences in immune profiles between children with double diagnosis and children with single diagnosis and reference children. Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of the different diagnosis groups within the clusters and whole cohort, respectively.

    Results: The largest cluster included 75% of the participants and the diagnose distribution in the cluster were very similar to the distribution in the whole study cohort. The remaining 25% were divided in two smaller clusters representing 15.5% and 6.5% respectively. The major finding of this study showed that children with double diagnosis had (1) lower serum levels of IL-22, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 compared to children with T1D; and (2) lower serum levels of the APC associated chemokine MIP-1α compared to reference children, observed in the main cluster. Most of these observations were also seen in the whole cohort.  

    Conclusion: Our observations indicate decreased serum levels of IL-22, MIP-1α, MCP-1, PCT, visfatin and MMP-2 in children diagnosed with T1D in combination with CD. These results indicate a suppressed immune profile including Th17 cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, diabetes-related and matrix metalloproteinase immune markers. Functional studies of the involved immune cells (CD4+ Treg, CD8+ Treg, NK-cells and dendritic cells) could contribute to elucidate the heterogeneous immunological processes in children with more than one autoimmune disease.

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  • 15.
    Åkesson, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Pediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital; Futurum – the Academy for Health and Care in Jönköping County Council.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Futurum – the Academy for Health and Care in Jönköping County Council; Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital.
    Rydén, A
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Futurum – the Academy for Health and Care in Jönköping County Council; Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital.
    Low expression of CD39+/CD45RA+ on regulatory T cells (Treg) cells in type 1 diabetic children in contrast to high expression of CD101+/CD129+ on Treg cells in children with coeliac disease2015In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and coeliac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. As T1D and coeliac disease share the same risk genes, patients risk subsequently developing the other disease. This study aimed to investigate the expression of T helper (Th), T cytotoxic (Tc) and regulatory T cells (Treg) in T1D and/or coeliac disease children in comparison to healthy children. Subgroups of T cells (Th:CD4+ or Tc:CD8+); naive (CD27+CD28+CD45RA+CCR7+), central memory (CD27+CD28+CD45RA-CCR7+), effector memory (early differentiated; CD27+CD28+CD45RA-CCR7- and late differentiated; CD27-CD28-CD45RA-CCR7-), terminally differentiated effector cells (TEMRA; CD27-CD28-CD45RA+CCR7-) and Treg (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127-) cells, and their expression of CD39, CD45RA, CD101 and CD129, were studied by flow cytometry in T1D and/or coeliac disease children or without any of these diseases (reference group). Children diagnosed with both T1D and coeliac disease showed a higher percentage of TEMRA CD4+ cells (P<0·05), but lower percentages of both early and late effector memory CD8+ cells (P<0·05) compared to references. Children with exclusively T1D had lower median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) (P<0·05) and also a lower percentage of CD39+ and CD45RA+ within the Treg population (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127-) (P<0·05). Children with exclusively coeliac disease had a higher MFI of CD101 (P<0·01), as well as a higher percentage of CD129+ (P<0·05), in the CD4+CD25hi lymphocyte population, compared to references. In conclusion, children with combined T1D and coeliac disease have a higher percentage of differentiated CD4+ cells compared to CD8+ cells. T1D children show signs of low CD39+/CD45RA+ Treg cells that may indicate loss of suppressive function. Conversely, children with coeliac disease show signs of CD101+/CD129+ Treg cells that may indicate suppressor activity.

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