Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 393
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Al-Azawy, Mawahib
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Oterhals, Kjersti
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Assmus, Jörg
    Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Schuster, Peter
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Premedication and preoperative information reduces pain intensity and increases satisfaction in patients undergoing ablation for atrial fibrillation: A randomised controlled study2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 268-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Pain and discomfort are common during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for atrial fibrillation.

    Aims

    To compare and evaluate the effect of premedication, standardised preoperative information and preoperative anxiety on pain intensity, drug consumption and patients’ satisfaction.

    Methods

    Preoperative anxiety at baseline, pain intensity during RFA, and patient satisfaction after the procedure were measured in 3 random groups. Group A (n = 20) received standard pain management, group B (n = 20) received premedication and group C (n = 20) received premedication and standardised preoperative information.

    Results

    Patients in groups B and C experienced less pain intensity (p < 0.001) and needed fewer anxiolytics (p = 0.023) and analgesics (p = 0.031) compared to group A. Patient satisfaction was higher in group C (p = 0.005) compared to group A. Increased preoperative anxiety is related to elevated drug demand (p < 0.05).

    Conclusion

    Premedication alone or combined with preoperative information reduces and higher preoperative anxiety increases pain intensity and drug consumption during RFA. Preoperative information improves patient satisfaction.

  • 2.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bostan, C
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Cieza, A
    A Multidisciplinary Cross-Cultural Measurement of Functioning After Stroke: Rasch Analysis of the Brief ICF Core Set for Stroke2011In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 573-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of constructing a multiprofessional cross-cultural measure of functioning after stroke across categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Method: Data on 757 stroke survivors from China, Germany, Italy, and Sweden, including ratings of 15 categories from the Brief ICF Core Set for stroke, were analyzed using the Rasch model. Unidimensionality, reliability, fit of the ICF categories to the model, ordering of response options of the ICF qualifier, and presence of differential item functioning (DIF) were studied. Results: Of the 15 ICF categories, response options for 7 categories were collapsed, 5 categories were deleted due to misfit, and 4 ICF categories showed DIF for country and were accordingly split into country-specific categories. The proposed final clinical measure consists of 20 ICF categories (6 categories were country-common) with an overall fit statistic of χ2180 = 184.87, P = .386, and a person separation index of r = 0.72, which indicates good reliability. Based on an individual's functioning after stroke, the ratings across the different ICF categories can be summed on an interval scale ranging from 0 to 100. Conclusion: A construction of a cross-cultural clinical measure after stroke based on ICF categories across body functions, structures, and activities and participation was possible. With this kind of clinical measure, stroke survivors' functional levels can be compared even across countries. Despite the promising results, further studies are necessary to develop definitive measures based on ICF categories.

  • 3.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany .
    Sunnehagen, Katharina S
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Factors Associated With Health-Related Quality of Life After Stroke: A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study2012In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, ISSN 1545-9683, E-ISSN 1552-6844, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 266-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In line with patient-centered health care, it is necessary to understand patients’ perceptions of health. How stroke survivors perceive their health at different time points after stroke and which factors are associated with these feelings provide important information about relevant rehabilitation targets. Objective. This study aimed to identify the independent factors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from a biopsychosocial perspective using the methods of multivariate regression at 3 different time points poststroke. Methods. Included in the study were 99 patients from stroke units with diagnosed first-ever stroke. At admission and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year poststroke, HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS). Consequences in Body Functions and Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were documented using 155 categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Stroke. Results. For a period of 1 year, problems with recreation and leisure, personality functions, energy and drive functions, and gait pattern functions were repeatedly associated with worse HRQoL. Whereas Body Functions and Activities and Participation explained more than three-fourths of the variances of HRQoL at 6 weeks and 3 months (R 2 = 0.80-0.93), the variation at 1 year was best explained by either Body Functions or Environmental Factors (R 2 = 0.51). Conclusions. The results indicate the importance of Body Functions and Activities and Participation (mainly personality functions and recreation and leisure) on HRQoL within 3 months poststroke, but increased impact of Environmental Factors on HRQoL at 1 year.

  • 4. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, RJ
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Ekebergh, M
    Caught in an artificial split: a phenomenological study of being a caregiver in the technologically intense environment.2008In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A symbiotic relationship exists between technology and caring, however, technologically advanced environments challenge caregivers. The aim of this study is to uncover the meaning of being a caregiver in the technologically intense environment. Ten open-ended interviews with intensive care personnel comprise the data. A phenomenological analysis shows that ambiguity abounds in the setting. The act of responsibly reading and regulating instruments easily melds the patient and the machinery into one clinical picture. The fusion skews the balance between objective distance and interpersonal closeness. The exciting captivating lure of technological gadgets seduces the caregivers and lulls them into a fictive sense of security and safety. It is mind-boggling and heart-rending to juggle 'moments' of slavish mastery and security menaced by insecurity in the act of monitoring a machine while caring for a patient. Whenever the beleaguered caregiver splits technique from human touch, ambiguity decays into ambivalence. Caring and technology become polarized. Everyone loses. Caregiver competence wanes; patients suffer. The intensive care unit should be technologically sophisticated, but also build-in a disclosive space where solace, trust, and reassurance naturally happen. Caring professionals need to balance state-of-the-art technology with integrated and comprehensive care and harmonize the demands of subjectivity with objective signs

  • 5. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, RJ
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö universitet.
    Ekebergh, M
    Of vigilance and invisibility: beeing a patient in technologically intense environments2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Baigi, A
    Hildingh, C
    Jogre, J
    Lyrström, L
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Acute coronary syndrome: social support and coping ability on admittance.2008In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare social support and coping ability in acute coronary syndrome patients at the time of the cardiac event with a healthy community-based sample, with regard to age, sex, education and marital status. Method: The study comprised 241 patients and 316 healthy controls. The participants answered a self-administered questionnaire that included three well-established scales. Multiple logistic regression was used in the analysis to compare the health situation between the patients and controls. Results: Persons suffering from acute coronary syndrome rated emotional support significantly lower than the healthy controls. However, there were no differences between the two groups in terms of socio-demographic variables. Conclusion: This study indicates that social support may be a predictor of acute coronary syndrome.

  • 7. Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Alapack, Richard J
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Beleaguered by technology: care in technologically intense environments.2008In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern technology has enabled the use of new forms of information in the care of critically ill patients. In intensive care units (ICUs), technology can simultaneously reduce the lived experience of illness and magnify the objective dimensions of patient care. The aim of this study, based upon two empirical studies, is to find from a philosophical point of view a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance of technology within intensive care. Along with caring for critically ill patients, technology is part of the ICU staff's everyday life. Both technology and caring relationships are of indispensable value. Tools are useful, but technology can never replace the closeness and empathy of the human touch. It is a question of harmonizing the demands of subjectivity with objective signs. The challenge for caregivers in ICU is to know when to heighten the importance of the objective and measurable dimensions provided by technology and when to magnify the patients' lived experiences, and to live and deal with the ambiguity of the technical dimension of care and the human side of nursing.

  • 8. Almerud Österberg, S
    et al.
    Baigi, A
    Bering, C
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Knowledge of heart disease risk in patients declining rehabilitation2010In: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 288-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes (CRPs) allows patients to increase their knowledge of the importance of established risk factors to help them maintain healthy lifestyle changes after coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Aim: To explore perceived importance and knowledge of known risk factors for CHD among non-attendees in CRPs.

    Method: Consecutive non-attendees in CRPs (n=106) answered a questionnaire focusing on patients' attitudes towards risk factors and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Results: The non-attendees lacked knowledge of non-physical characteristics such as depression and social isolation. They also had poor knowledge about biological causes and hereditary factors. However, those who said they knew enough about CHD to prevent recurrent illness did have sufficient knowledge about the established risk factors.

    Conclusion: There is a lack of knowledge about social isolation and depression and their importance in the development of CHD among the non-attendees. They show greater knowledge about biological risk factors than the importance of companionship, joy and happiness. CHD and loneliness are intimately correlated, so creating a sense of belonging must not be underestimated as a measure to prevent CHD.

  • 9. Alm-Roijer, C
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö universitet.
    Stagmo, M
    Erhardt, L
    Knowing your risk factors for coronary heart disease improves adherence to advice on lifestyle changes and medication2006In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 21, no 5, p. E24-E31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Alm-Roijer, C
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Stagmo, M
    Erhardt, L
    Pivotal factors for successful implementation of secondary prevention actions in patients with coronary heart diseaseIn: AAMA. E-pubArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Amofah, H. A.
    et al.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Thoracic surgical unit, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Eide, L. S. P. E.
    Bergen University College, Institute of Nursing, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Haaverstad, R. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, K. O. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical research, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, K. K. J. K.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Schjott, J. S.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, A. H. R.
    University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Norekval, T. M. N.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Factors affecting in-hospital sleep-wake pattern in octogenarians during the early postoperative phase after transcutaneous aortic valve replacement2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S53-S53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarian patients are an increasing group admitted for advanced cardiac treatment. Little is known about factors disturbing their sleep-wake pattern in the early postoperative phase after transcutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI), as current knowledge is based upon studies on younger age groups treated for surgical aortic valve replacement.

    Aim: To determine factors affecting the in-hospital sleep wake pattern in octogenarian patients after TAVI.

    Methods: This is a prospective cohort study in a tertiary university hospital. Inclusion criteria were age > 80 years with severe aortic stenosis accepted for TAVI. Actigraphy was used to identify sleep-wake pattern (sleep time night and sleep time day), and the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) to measure self-reported insomnia daily during the first five postoperative days. Charlson`s comorbidity index was used as a measure of comorbidities and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) to rate pain severity. Information regarding duration of anesthesia, blood transfusion and parenteral administration of morphine equivalents were derived from the patients’ medical journals. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between variables.

    Results: In all, 65 patients (41 women) were included. Mean age was 85 years (SD 2.8). No significant associations were found between age, comorbidities, blood transfusion and morphine equivalents and sleep. Gender was significantly associated with sleep time night and sleep efficiency as men had shortest duration of sleep from the third to the fifth postoperative night (p < .001, and adjusted R2=.230 to .283). Duration of anesthesia had a significant association with sleep time night and sleep efficiency from the third to the fifth postoperative night (p=.013 to p < .001, and adjusted R2=.230 to .283), where longer duration gave less total sleep and lower sleep efficiency. VAS score correlated with wake time night the third night, where a higher VAS score gave more wake time (p=.006 and adjusted R2 .236).

    Conclusion: Male gender, longer duration of perioperative anesthesia and postoperative pain were associated with disturbances in the postoperative sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after TAVI. This knowledge is important and relevant and should have implications in improving patient care.

  • 12.
    Amofah, H. A.
    et al.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Thoracic surgical unit, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Eide, L. S. P. E.
    Bergen University College, Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Haaverstad, R. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, K. O. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical research, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, K. K. J. K.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Schjott, J. S.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, A. H. R.
    University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Norekval, T. M. N.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway .
    Factors associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after surgical aortic valve replacement2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S63-S64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Disturbances of the sleep-wake pattern are known phenomenon in the postoperative phase after aortic valve replacement (SAVR) that have negative impact on the morbidity, quality of life and mortality. Octogenarian patients are an increasing group admitted for cardiac surgery, however knowledge is based on younger patients.

    Aims: To determine factors associated with disturbances in postoperative sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients after SAVR.

    Methods: A prospective cohort study of octogenarian patients in a single center university hospital. Inclusion criteria were age > 80 years, severe aortic stenosis, accepted for SAVR. Actigraphy was used to identify the sleep-wake pattern (sleep-time, sleep efficiency and wake time night and sleep- and wake-time day) for the five first postoperative days, and the sleep questionnaires Minimal Insomnia Symptom scale (MISS) to measure the selfreported insomnia at baseline and daily for the five first postoperative days. 

    Charlsons comorbidity index was used to score comorbidities and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), was used to rate pain severity. The patients’ medical journals were used to record duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusions and parenteral administration of morphine equivalents. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between variables.

    Results: In all, 78 patients were included (40 women). Mean age was 82 years (SD 2.0). For the sleep-wake pattern first to fifth postoperative night, mean sleep-time night was 330-370 minutes (SD 32-124). Mean sleep efficiency was 68-77% (SD 21-26). Mean sleep-time day was 545-712 minutes (SD 146-169). Mean insomnia score was 1,8-5,3 (SD 2,6-3,8). On the first postoperative night the pain VAS score correlated with wake time night, where a higher VAS indicated more wake time (p=.014, adjusted R2=.213). No other variable; age, gender, duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusion or morphine equivalents showed significant association with the sleep-wake pattern or insomnia.

    Conclusion: Postoperative pain was associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after SAVR. This indicates that pain management may be inadequate for patients after SAVR. More research on this issue is needed to establish data needed to improve treatment and care.

  • 13.
    Amofah, Hege A.
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen University College, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Bjorvatn, Bjørn
    Norwegian Competence Centre for Sleep Disorders, Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, Karl Ove
    Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, Anette H.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Norekvål, Tone M.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase.

    Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep–wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI.

    Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep–wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days.

    Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p < 0.01).

    Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep–wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Bodil T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the radiographers’ competence scale2012In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing the competence of registered radiographers’ clinical work is of great importance because of the recent change in nursing focus and rapid technological development. Self-assessment assists radiographers to validate and improve clinical practice by identifying their strengths as well as areas that may need to be developed. The aim of the study was to develop and psychometrically test a specially designed instrument, the Radiographers Competence Scale (RCS). A cross sectional survey was conducted comprising 406 randomly selected radiographers all over Sweden. The study consisted of two phases; the development of the instrument and evaluation of its psychometric properties. The first phase included three steps: 1) construction of the RCS; 2) pilot testing of face and content validity; and 3) creation of a web-based 54-item questionnaire for testing the instrument. The second phase comprised psychometric evaluation of construct validity, internal consistency reliability and item reduction. The analysis reduced the initial 54 items of the RCS to 28 items. A logical two-factor solution was identified explaining 53.8% of the total variance. The first factor labelled “Nurse initiated care” explained 31.7% of the total variance. Factor 2 labelled “Technical and radiographic processes” explained 22.1% of the total variance. The scale had good internal consistency reliability, with a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.87. The RCS is a short, easy to administer scale for capturing radiographers’ competence levels and the frequency of using their competence. The scale was found to be valid and reliable. The self-assessment RCS can be used in management, patient safety and quality improvement to enhance the radiographic process.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Bodil T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Radiographers' self-assessed level and use of competencies: a national survey2012In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 635-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe radiographers' self-assessed level and use of competencies as well as how sociodemographic and situational factors are associated with these competencies, particularly related to work experience.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional design was employed. Radiographers (n = 406) completed the self-administered 28-item questionnaire encompassing two dimensions: 'Nurse-initiated care' and 'Technical and radiographic processes'. The level of competencies was rated on a 10-point scale and the frequency of use on a 6-point scale.

    RESULTS: Most competencies received high ratings both in terms of level and frequency of use. In 'Nurse-initiated care' the competency 'Adequately informing the patient' was rated the highest, while 'Identifying and encountering the patient in a state of shock' and 'Participating in quality improvement regarding patient safety and care' received the lowest ratings. In 'Technical and radiographic processes' the highest rated competencies were 'Adapting the examination to the patient's prerequisites and needs' and 'Producing accurate and correct images'. The lowest frequency of use was 'Preliminary assessment of images'.

    CONCLUSION: The main findings underline the radiographers' high competency in both 'Nurse-initiated care' and 'Technical and radiographic processes'. The lower rated competencies emphasise the importance of continuous professional education and quality improvement.

    MAIN MESSAGES :

    • Assessing radiographers' clinical competencies is fundamental for ensuring professional standards.

    • Most competencies received high ratings both in the nursing and in the radiographic dimensions.

    • The highest rated competencies focussed on information and adaptability to the patients needs.

    • The lowest rated competencies focussed on encountering the patient in shock and image assessments.

    • Age, years in present position and work place only explained a relatively small part of competency.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Bodil T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Elgán, C
    Axelsson, ÅB
    Radiographers' areas of professional competence related to good nursing care2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 401-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiographers' ability and competence is a matter of vital importance for patients. Nursing care is an integral part of the radiographer's work. The demand for high competence in clinical activities has increased in diagnostic radiology and has had an impact on the development of the profession.

    AIM: The aim was to describe the radiographer's areas of professional competence in relation to good nursing care based on critical incidents that occur in the course of radiological examinations and interventions.

    METHOD: A descriptive design with a qualitative approach, using the Critical Incident Technique was employed. Interviews were conducted with a strategic sample of registered radiographers (n = 14), based at different hospitals in Sweden.

    ETHICAL ISSUES: The appropriate ethical principles were followed. All the participants provided informed consent, and formal approval for conducting the research was obtained according to national and local directives.

    RESULTS: The data analysis resulted in two main areas; direct and indirect patient-related areas of competence, which describe the radiographers' skills that either facilitate or hinder good nursing care. In the direct patient-related area of competence, four categories emerged, which illustrate good nursing care in the patient's immediate surroundings. In the indirect patient-related area of competence, four categories illuminated good nursing care that is provided without direct contact with the patient.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights the different areas of the radiographer's unique professional competence. The findings provide insight into the radiographer's profession, on one hand as a carer and on the other as a medical technologist as well as highlighting the importance of each role. The radiographer's work encompasses a variety of components--from caring for the patient to handling and checking the technical equipment.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Bodil T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Elgán, Carina
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Female patients' encounters with the radiographer in the course of recurrent radiographic examinations – a qualitative study2012Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Andersson, E
    et al.
    Antonsson, M
    Corin, B
    Swahn, B
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    The preventive effect of lithium therapy on bipolar disorder patients, with special reference to gender and age1995In: International Journal of Rehabilitation and Health, ISSN 1068-9591, E-ISSN 1573-1537, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 203-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Andersson, S
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    The aphasic person's views of the encounter with other people: a grounded theory analysis2002In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Orebro Universitet, Department of Cardiology, Orebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Uddevalla Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Orebro Universitet, School of Health Sciences, Orebro, Sweden.
    Steinke, Elaine E.
    Wichita State University, School of Nursing, Wichita, United States.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Decreased sexual function in partners after patients’ first-time myocardial infarction2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A myocardial infarction event affects not only patients but also partners, although how it affects the partners’ sexual function is not studied.

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to describe and compare how partners experienced their sexual function one year before with one year after first-time myocardial infarction of their partner.

    Methods: A longitudinal and comparative design was used. Self-reported data on Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire was collected retrospectively at two occasions from 123 partners (87 women and 36 men), measuring the year prior to the first-time myocardial infarction and the year after. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Results: The total score for Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire showed a significant decrease over time. In all four subscales a decrease was found, which were statistically significant in three out of the four subscales (sexual desire, 19.39 vs 18.61; p<0.001, orgasm, 14.11 vs 13.64; p=0.027 and satisfaction, 12.61 vs 12.31; p=0.042). Twenty-six partners reported that their intercourse frequencies decreased over time, while six partners reported an increased intercourse frequency.

    Conclusions: Partners’ sexual function decreased after patients’ first-time myocardial infarction. It is important for health personnel to offer information and discussion about sexual function and concerns with both patients and partners after a first-time myocardial infarction. 

  • 21. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The male partners' experiences of the intimate relationships after a first myocardial infarction2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress in the intimate relationship is found to worsen the prognosis in women suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Little is known about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship.

    Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the experience of men's intimate relationships in connection to and after their female partner's first MI.

    Methods: An explorative and qualitative design was used. Interviews were conducted with 16 men having a partner who the year before had suffered a first MI. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes emerged: masculine image challenged; life takes another direction; and life remains unchanged. The men were forced to deal with an altered image of themselves as men, and as sexual beings. They were hesitant to approach their spouse in the same way as before the MI because they viewed her to be more fragile. The event also caused them to consider their own lifestyle, changing towards healthier dietary and exercise habits.

    Conclusions: After their spouse's MI, men experienced a challenge to their masculine image. They viewed their spouse as being more fragile, which led the men to be gentler in sexual intimacy and more hesitant to invite sexual activity. This knowledge about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship could be helpful for health personnel in hospitals and primary care when they interact with couples where the woman suffers from cardiac disease or other chronic disorders.

  • 22. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11/12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction (MI).

    Background. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after MI.

    Design. The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

    Methods. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first MI during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings. Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

    Conclusions. The partners’ MI had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following MI.

  • 23. Arvidsson , B
    et al.
    Skärsäter , I
    Baigi , A
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    The development of a questionnaire for evaluating process-oriented group supervision during nursing education2008In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of process-oriented group supervision are difficult to evaluate, as the validity and reliability of the existing instruments have been questioned. The aim was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the effects of process-oriented group supervision on nursing students during their three-year nursing education. A 55-item Process-oriented Group Supervision Questionnaire (PGSQ) with a developmental design was formulated on the basis of a literature review and the expectations of nursing students who participated in a three-year nursing education programme (N=176). Construct validity and internal consistency reliability were tested at the end of each study year: year 1 (T1), year 2 (T2), and year 3 (T3) by means of exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. An adequate explorative factor analysis (principal component analysis, varimax rotation) with an Eigenvalue >1.0 and factor loadings >0.40, reduced the questionnaire to 18 items comprising three factors labelled educative, supportive and developmental, which explained 60.2% at T1, 71.8% at T2, and 69.3% at T3 of the total cumulative variance. The corresponding Cronbach's alpha coefficient figures were 0.89 (T1), 0.94 (T2) and 0.93 (T3). The 18-item PGSQ is considered to be a short and useful tool due to its satisfactory validity and reliability figures.

  • 24. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    Factors influencing nurse supervisor competence: a critical incident analysis study2005In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 231-237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Löfgren, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how a group supervision programme in nursing care influences their professional competence: a 4-year follow-up study2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Löfgren, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how group supervision in nursing care influences their professional competence2000In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Svensson, M-L
    Baigi, A
    Effects of process-oriented group supervision as reported by nursing students - a pilot study2008In: Nordic Journal of Nursing Research and Clinical Studies, ISSN 0107-4083, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Arvidsson, B
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Oijervall, J
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Process-oriented group supervision implemented during nursing education: nurses' conceptions 1 year after their nursing degree2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 868-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the variation in how nurses conceive process-oriented group supervision, implemented during nursing education, 1 year after their nursing degree. BACKGROUND: Process-oriented group supervision can be an effective support system for helping nursing students and nurses to reflect on their activities. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative design was chosen for the study. Conceptions were collected through interviews with 18 strategically selected Swedish nurses in 2005. RESULTS: Three descriptive categories comprising seven conceptions were emerged. Supportive actions comprised: a sense of security, belonging and encouragement. Learning actions involved: sharing and reflecting while developmental actions described: enabling professional identity and facilitating personal development. CONCLUSIONS: Process-oriented group supervision has a lasting influence on nurses' development. The possibility to reflect over new stances during nursing education was a prerequisite for the provision of high-quality care. Process-oriented group supervision can make an important contribution to nursing education. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Process-oriented group supervision provides nurses with the strength to achieve resilience to stress in their work. It may lead to autonomy as well as clarity in the nurse's professional function. This indicates the need for nurse managers to organize reflective group supervision as an integral part of the nurse's work.

  • 29. Arvidsson, SB
    et al.
    Petersson, A
    Nilsson, I
    Andersson, B
    Arvidsson, BI
    Pettersson, IF
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö universitet.
    A nurse-led rheumatology clinic's impact on empowering patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative study2006In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, no 102, p. -13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Results: Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure.

    Conclusions: This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies.

  • 31.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Health predicting factors in a general population over an eight-year period in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 98-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many factors are proposed to be associated with health-related quality of life. Knowledge of health factors associated to development of a good health-related quality of life could be of use in clinical practice and public health work. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health factors and health-related quality of life at baseline and in an eight-year follow up in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain in a cohort from a general population. METHODS: The study was designed as a longitudinal study in a Swedish general population (N=1 849) with a postal questionnaire at baseline 1995 and at follow up 2003. Subjects were divided into two groups, according to their response about chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and suggested health factors were estimated by OR and 95 % CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions, with adjustment for all health factors, age, sex and baseline SF-36 values. RESULTS: Although subjects without chronic musculoskeletal pain reported better health-related quality of life than subjects with chronic pain, similar health factors were found to be associated to higher scores in SF-36 at baseline and predicted a better outcome in the eight-year follow up. The most consistent finding was a better health outcome in the eight-year follow up for subjects that were feeling rested after sleep. Other factors that in some aspects predicted a better outcome were belonging to higher socioeconomic group, being a native Swede, having emotional support, having good sleep structure, never being or being a former smoker, and regularly drinking alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: The most important health factor in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain was feeling rested after sleep, but also emotional support, sleep structure, smoking and alcoholic habits appears to be important components. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with painful musculoskeletal disorders. Since several health factors are common in both subjects with and without pain there could be a common strategy to be formed in public health programmes.

  • 32.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Växjö universitet.
    Experiences of health-promoting self-care in people living with rheumatic diseases2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim This paper is a report of a study which explores and describes the meaning of the phenomenon health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases.

    Background People with rheumatic diseases estimate health status as low and health belief and health status influence the self-care behaviours. Several self-care behaviours are used in the efforts to mitigate the diseases.

    Method The study had a descriptive phenomenological approach based on a reflective life-world perspective. Data were gathered in 2007 by unstructured open-ended interviews with 12 individuals living with rheumatic diseases.

    Findings The meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care takes place against a background of continual hope and belief to influence health in positive ways. Self-care was a way of life and implied being ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Three inter-related constituents elucidated the experiences: dialogue, power struggle and choice. Self-care was experienced as dialogues within the body and with the immediate environment. In order to respond to signals from the body, power struggles were required to be entered when fighting the diseases. Choices were required to be made and things that were beneficial for the body were prioritized.

    Conclusion In this study, the meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care was a way of life. This meant to be ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Self-care required dialogues, power struggles and choices.

  • 33.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköpings universitet.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning program as reported by people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled pilot study2011In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning (PBL) program for people with rheumatic diseases, in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQL), empowerment and self-care ability at a six month follow-up.

    Methods: A randomized controlled design was selected with pre-test, one-week and six months post-test after the one-year PBL-program. The participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=54) or the control group (n=148). The differences were analyzed by t-test and Pearson Chi-square.

    Results: The participants in the experimental group had stronger empowerment after participation in the PBL-program compared with the control group. There were no differences in HRQL, self-care ability, sense of coherence, pain, quality of sleep or fatigue between the groups. The participants in the experimental group stated they had implemented lifestyle changes they had not done without the PBL-program.

    Conclusion: The present self-care promoting PBL-program enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment but not their HRQL and self-care ability compared with the control group.

    Practice Implications: It is important to continue to develop PBL in patient education in order to find the very best way to use this pedagogical model in rheumatology care. 

  • 34.
    Arvidsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    The Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1500-1514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

    Background

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

    Design

    Randomized controlled trial.

    Methods

    A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

    Results

    The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

    Conclusion

    The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care.

  • 35.
    Arvidsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-232012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Empowerment is a central concept in both rheumatology and diabetes care. A Swedish empowerment instrument for patients with rheumatic diseases has not been created before now. The aim of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-23, such as construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-item correlations and discriminant validity.

    METHODS: The already existing instrument, the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale (SWE-DES-23), was adapted for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The adapted instrument was called the SWE-RES-23. In 2009, 260 patients with rheumatic diseases from a rheumatology unit in Sweden completed the instrument. Construct validity was tested by using exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliability was tested by the use of Cronbach's α-coefficient. In order to determine unidimensionality of the empowerment subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. To establish discriminant validity, an item about self-perceived health from the Short Form (SF) 36 was used in addition to the SWE-RES-23.

    RESULTS: The exploratory factor analysis resulted in five factors (empowerment subscales) with eigenvalues >1, explaining 64.1% of the total variance: Goal achievement and overcoming barriers to goal achievement; Self-knowledge; Managing stress; Assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change; and Support for caring. Cronbach's α values ranged from 0.59 to 0.91, and the value for the total score was 0.92.

    CONCLUSION: The results support the possibility of adapting the SWE-DES-23 for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The SWE-RES-23 shows acceptable psychometric properties, in terms of construct validity and internal consistency reliability. To validate the SWE-RES-23 fully, further studies are needed, with a focus on test-retest correlations.

  • 36. Axelsson, A
    et al.
    Herlitz, J
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    How bystanders perceive their cardiopulmonary resuscitation intervention: a qualitative study2000In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 71-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Axelsson, Åsa B
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Moons, Philip
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Scholte op Reimer, Wilma
    Smith, Karen
    Strömberg, Anna
    Thompson, David R
    Norekvål, Tone M
    European cardiovascular nurses' experiences of and attitudes towards having family members present in the resuscitation room2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Backe, M
    et al.
    Larsson, K
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Patients' conceptions of their life situation within the first week after a stroke event: a qualitative analysis1996In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 285-294Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Baigi, A
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lunds universitet.
    Marklund, B
    Oden, A
    Cardiovascular mortality focusing on socio-economic influence: the low-risk population of Halland compared to the population of Sweden as a whole2002In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 285-288Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Baigi, A
    et al.
    Hildingh, C
    Virdhall, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by patients with a suspected or manifest myocardial infarction: a short-term follow-up study2008In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by ischaemic heart disease patients at baseline and two weeks post-discharge in terms of age, sex, educational and marital status. DESIGN: Multicentre study with a prospective short-term follow-up design. SETTING: A university hospital, a central hospital and a district hospital in southern Sweden. SUBJECTS: Consecutive sample of 246 patients with a suspect or manifest myocardial infarction. MAIN MEASURES: The Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R), the Medical Outcome Study (MOS) Social Support Survey and the Sense of Coherence Scale were included in a self-administered questionnaire and answered twice, together with sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: Bivariate analyses indicated changes in social support (practical support increased in men and decreased in women; both P= 0.003) and social network (family network increased among >65 year olds; P= 0.001, men; P= 0.013, and women; P= 0.033, those with a low; P=0.017, and intermediate; P= 0.033, educational level, as well as those cohabiting; P= 0.0001), but did not reveal any difference in sense of coherence. CONCLUSIONS: Sociodemographic variables have no influence on sense of coherence but do affect social support (i.e. practical support and social network, family). Ischaemic heart disease patients' short stay in hospital implies that the network outside the hospital has to assume responsibility, but at the same time it is important for health care professionals to have sufficient knowledge to be able to support the specific needs of patients and their family members.

  • 41. Baigi, A
    et al.
    Marklund, B
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    The association between socio-economic status and chest pain, focusing on self-rated health in a primary health care area of Sweden2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 420-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Forslind, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health & Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Person-centred care in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics: Conceptualization and initial development of a measurement instrument.2018In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is considered a key component of effective illness management and high-quality care. However, the PCC concept is underdeveloped in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and its further development and evaluation is of high priority. The aim of the present study was to conceptualize and operationalize PCC, in order to develop an instrument for measuring patient-perceived PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics.

    METHODS: A conceptual outpatient PCC framework was developed, based on the experiences of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), person-centredness principles and existing PCC frameworks. The resulting framework was operationalized into the PCC instrument for outpatient care in rheumatology (PCCoc/rheum), which was tested for acceptability and content validity among 50 individuals with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic.

    RESULTS: The conceptual framework focuses on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse, and comprises five interrelated domains: social environment, personalization, shared decision-making, empowerment and communication. Operationalization of the domains into a pool of items generated a preliminary PCCoc/rheum version, which was completed in a mean (standard deviation) of 5.3 (2.5) min. Respondents found items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). The Content Validity Index of the PCCoc/rheum was 0.94 (item level range, 0.87-1.0). About 80% of respondents considered some items redundant. Based on these results, the PCCoc/rheum was revised into a 24-item questionnaire.

    CONCLUSIONS: A conceptual outpatient PCC framework and a 24-item questionnaire intended to measure PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics were developed. The extent to which the questionnaire represents a measurement instrument remains to be tested.

  • 43.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Forslind, Kristina
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Thomé, Bibbi
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: A BARFOT study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2646-2656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective: To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    Background: A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    Design: A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used.

    Methods: Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method.

    Results: Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services.

    Conclusions: Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way.

    Relevance to clinical practice: A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals. 

  • 44.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hesselgård, Karin
    Corporate office, Skåne Regional Council, Malmö, Sweden.
    The experience of care at nurse-led rheumatology clinics2012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 202-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience the care provided by Swedish nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    METHODS: Eighteen adult people with a diagnosis of RA who had had at least three documented contact sessions with a nurse-led clinic were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Care was expressed in three categories: social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures. A social environment including a warm encounter, a familial atmosphere and pleasant premises was desired and contributed to a positive experience of care. The nurses' professional approach was experienced as empathy, knowledge and skill, as well as support. The care was described as person centred and competent, as it was based on the individual's unique experience of his/her disease and needs. The nurses' specialist knowledge of rheumatology and rheumatology care was highly valued. The offered care represented added value for the participants, instilling security, trust, hope and confidence. It was perceived as facilitating daily life and creating positive emotions. The nurse-led clinics were reported to be easily accessible and provided continuity of the care. These features were presented as fundamental guarantees for health care safety.

    CONCLUSION: The experiences emphasized the need for a holistic approach to care. In this process, the organization of care and the role and skills of the nurse should be focused on the individual's needs and perspectives. The social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures are particularly relevant for optimal care at nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

  • 45.
    Bala, V.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Forslind, K.
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Svensson, B.
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, P.
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Towards measurement of person-centered care outcomes in outpatient nurse-led clinics2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no Suppl. 2, p. 1520-1520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Person-centered care (PCC) is increasingly emphasized as a key component of effective illness management and of developing high quality of care. Despite considerable progress of PCC in many areas of care there is currently a gap and a need for means to assess PCC practice in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and further development and evaluation of this approach to care is thus of high priority.

    Objectives To develop an instrument for measuring person-centered care from the perspective of the person with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in nurse-led outpatient clinics.

    Methods A conceptual framework of PCC in the outpatient context and focusing on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse and on the patient as an active care partner was undertaken. Based on this framework, qualitative interviews (1,2) and a literature review, a 35-item questionnaire was proposed and qualitatively tested regarding acceptability and content validity among 50 persons with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic. Two versions of the questionnaire were tested: one using four response categories (0 = Totally disagree; 3 = Completely agree), and one using two response categories (0 = Disagree; 1 = Agree). Content validity was estimated by calculating Content Validity Index of the individual items (I-CVI) and of the overall instrument (S-CVI).

    Results Respondents found the items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). Seventy-three percent of the respondents preferred the questionnaire version with four response categories. This version took a mean (SD) of 5.3 (2.5) minutes to complete. I-CVI values ranged from 0.87 to 1.00 and S-CVI was 0.94. About 80% of the respondents considered some items to be redundant. This resulted in a reduced 24-item draft questionnaire that yield a total score between 0–72.

    Conclusions A preliminary 24-item patient-reported PCC questionnaire was developed. Psychometric testing is needed for validation of this tool before implementation.

  • 46. Berben, L
    et al.
    Bogert, L
    Leventhal, ME
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jaarsma, T
    Norekvål, TM
    Smith, K
    Strömberg, A
    Thompson, DR
    De Geest, S
    Which interventions are used by healthcare professionals to enhance medication adherence in cardiovascular patients?: A survey of current clinical practice2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 14-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Complex medication regimens are often required to manage cardiovascular diseases. As non-adherence, which can have severe negative outcomes, is common among cardiovascular patients, various interventions to improve adherence should be implemented in daily practice.

    Aim To assess which strategies cardiovascular nurses and allied health professionals utilize to (1) assess patients' adherence to medication regimen, and (2) enhance medication adherence via educational/cognitive, counseling/behavioral, and psychological/affective interventions.

    Method A 45-item questionnaire to assess adherence assessment and interventional strategies utilized by health care professionals in daily clinical practice was distributed to a convenience sample of attendants of the 10th Annual Spring Meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions conference in Geneva (Switzerland) in March 2010. Respondents not in direct clinical practice were excluded. Descriptive statistics were used to describe practice patterns regarding adherence management.

    Results Of 276 distributed questionnaires, 171 (62%) were returned, of which 34 (20%) were excluded as respondents performed no direct patient care. Questioning patients about non-adherence during follow-up was the most frequently reported assessment strategy (56%). Educational/cognitive adherence enhancing interventions were used most frequently, followed by counseling/behavioral interventions. Psychological/affective interventions were less frequently used. The most frequent intervention used was providing reading materials (66%) followed by training patients regarding medication taking during inpatient recovery (48%). Slightly over two-thirds (69%) reported using a combination of interventions to improve patient's adherence.

    Conclusion Educational interventions are used most in clinical practice, although evidence shows they are less effective than behavioral interventions at enhancing medication adherence.

  • 47. Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    County Hospital Ryhov.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov.
    Malm, Dan Anders John
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    The impact of comprehensibility and sense of coherence in the recovery of patients with myocardial infarction: a long-term follow-up study2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After being through a myocardial infarction (MI), a severe recovery period ensues for the patient. Long-term follow-ups are helpful, but what this should include differs between patients. Today there is no established approach to identify needs for support after an MI.

    Aim: The aim was to describe sense of coherence (SOC) over time in relation to sex, as well as further SOC in relation to quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction in patients with an MI. Methods. This study had an observational and longitudinal design and followed 18 women and 60 men with an acute MI for 49–67 months after the onset of MI. Instruments used were the SOC-13 and the Seattle Angina Questionnaire.

    Results: Women scored lower SOC than men. A main effect of time was shown for comprehensibility which increased significantly from baseline to the long-term follow-up. Women increased from a lower level to an equal level as men at the long-term follow-up. The total SOC was significantly associated with QoL and treatment satisfaction.

    Conclusion: High comprehensibility and high SOC give the patient a better basis to handle life after MI. Thus, healthcare professionals should keep in mind that SOC and especially comprehensibility have meaning for the patient’s ability to handle her or his recovery. Healthcare professionals need to together with the patient identify and work with lifestyle factors that contribute to increased comprehensibility about the disease, which gives the patient the foundation to preserve and promote her or his health both in the short and long term.

  • 48.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, S
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Alfredsson, L
    Berglund, A
    Arvidsson, B
    Petersson, IF
    Patterns of background factors related to early RA patients' conceptions of the causes of their disease2011In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify patterns of background factors related to the early RA patients' conceptions of the cause of the disease. Conceptions from a qualitative study formed the basis for the stratification of 785 patients from the Swedish EIRA study answering a question about their own thoughts about the cause to RA. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the associations between patients' conceptions and relevant background factors: sex, age, civil status, educational level, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) and smoking habits. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A conception of family-related strain was strongly associated with being young (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.78 for age 58-70 vs. 17-46), female (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25-0.60 for male vs. female) and having a high level of education (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.54-3.01 for university degree vs. no degree). A conception of being exposed to climate changes was associated with being male (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.24-3.22 for male vs. female), having a low level of education (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.58 for university degree vs. no degree) and positive Anti-CCP (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.87 for positive vs. negative Anti-CCP). Linking patients' conceptions of the cause of their RA to background factors potentially could create new opportunities for understanding the complexity of the aetiology in RA. Furthermore, this information is important and relevant in the care of patients with early RA.

  • 49.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    "Delivering knowledge and advice": Healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients' management of rheumatoid arthritis.2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, p. -9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers' perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers' attitudes and patients' responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers' experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients' expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  • 50.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    “Striving for a Good Life”: The Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis as Experienced by Patients2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 5, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To generate a theoretical model how patients experience their management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in everyday life.Method: An explorative design with the grounded theory approach was used by interviewing 16 informants with RA.Results: The generated theoretical model emerged in a core category- Striving for a good life with two categories; making use of personal resources and grasping for support from others, which formed the base of managing RA. When relating these categories together, four dimensions emerged which characterised patients’ different ways of managing RA: mastering, relying, struggling and being resigned.Discussion: The management of RA incorporated the use of personal resources and the grasping for support from others. Both self-management strategies and patients’ need of support were highlighted as aspects that were of importance when managing RA. Patients’ experiences of their need of support to manage RA give extended knowledge that is of importance for nurses and other healthcare providers. The relationship between patients and healthcare providers is always the key to a good encounter. Interventions to increase self-management in RA have to incorporate this knowledge when trying to increase patients’ self-efficacy and with their experience of support

1234567 1 - 50 of 393
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf