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  • 1.
    Caffagni, Lou
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.
    Löfgren, IsabelSödertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.Martins, GizeleUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.Sartoretto, PaolaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Planalto riots: Making and unmaking a failed coup in Brazil2024Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historical events often carry an air of uncertainty, like a fog that veils their boundaries. Questions arise about when the historical process leading to a coup d’état, or in the case examined in this book, an attempted coup, truly begins. How is it orchestrated? What delineates its scope? Who are the involved actors, and what fields of study and knowledge are essential for comprehending it?

    This book delves into the attempted coup that transpired on January 8, 2023, in Brasilia, Brazil, following the defeat of Jair Bolsonaro and the inauguration of his successor, President Luis Inácio Lula da Silva. On that day, thousands of extremist Bolsonaro supporters invaded, sacked, and vandalized federal government buildings in Brasília with the aim of inciting a military coup against the Lula da Silva government and reinstating Jair Bolsonaro as the president of Brazil.

    The essays and artistic interventions in this collection aim to unravel the various dimensions of this pivotal event. They discuss the origins, occurrence, and aftermath of anti-democratic Bolsonarist mobilizations, with a specific focus on the communicative and symbolic aspects of this historical occurrence.

    From examining historical aspects to exploring aesthetic meanings, communication strategies, and the dynamics of a collective unconscious, “The Planalto Riots: Making and Unmaking a Failed Coup in Brazil” provides a critical perspective on the intricate process of how an attempted coup is both constructed and dismantled.

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  • 2.
    Cerqueira da Conceição, Elisabet
    et al.
    MST national coordination (Brazil) .
    Gomes de Moura, Luiz Enrique
    MST national coordination (Brazil) .
    Freitas, Camila
    Graduate Programme in Visual Arts, UFRJ (Brazil ).
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Our collective narrative was being constructed in the film production: A conversation at the crossroads between militants, media production and research [Nuestra narrativa colectiva se estaba construyendo en la producción cinematográfica: Una conversación en la encrucijada entre los militantes, la producción mediática y la investigación]2020In: Commons. Revista de Comunicación y Ciudadanía Digital, E-ISSN 2255-3401, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 186-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text is based on a conversation between members in the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement, a film producer and a media and communication researcher about the production process of the documentary Chão (Landless). Chão documents MST’s processes of land occupation and the battles to gain rights to land in the state of Goiás between 2014 and 2018. MST’s mobilization practices since the emergence of the Movement in 1984 have been much informed by Paulo Freire’s emancipatory pedagogy. The Movement’s historically situated social action constructs knowledge about reality at the same time that it changes reality. The documentary is an example of participatory media production in which the filmmaker and the militants constructed a narrative together from their different perspectives. This participatory process is used here as a departure point to discuss the experiential dynamics of the conscientization process from the different perspectives of research, media production, and militancy.

  • 3.
    Custódio, Leonardo
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Counter-Hegemonic Media Production from Urban and Rural Margins in Brazil2020In: Media and Governance in Latin America: Toward a Plurality of Voices / [ed] Ximena Orchard, Sara Garcia Santamaria, Julieta Brambila & Jairo Lugo-Ocando, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2020, p. 203-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Jeppesen, Sandra
    et al.
    Media, Film, and Communications, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Cartographies of Resistance: Counter-Data Mapping as the New Frontier of Digital Media Activism2023In: Media and Communication, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 150-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first datafied pandemic, the production of interactive Covid-19 data maps was intensified by state institutions and corporate media. Maps have been used by states and citizens to understand the advance and retreat of the contagion and monitor vaccine rates. However, the visualisations being used are often based on non-comparable data types across countries, leading to visual misrepresentations. Many pandemic data visualisations have consequently had a negative impact on public debate, contributing to an infodemic of disinformation that has stigmatised marginalised groups and detracted from social justice objectives. Counter to such hegemonic mapping, counter-data maps, produced by marginalised groups, have revealed hidden inequalities, supporting calls for intersectional health justice. This article investigates the ways in which various intersectional global communities have appropriated data, produced counter-data maps, unveiled hidden social realities, and generated more authentic social meanings through emergent counter-data mapping imaginaries. We use a comparative multi-case study, based on a multi case-study of three Covid-19 data mapping projects, namely Data for Black Lives (US), Indigenous Emergency (Brazil), and CityLab maps (global). Our findings indicate that counter-data mapping imaginaries are deeply embedded in community-oriented notions of spatiality and relationality. Moreover, the cartographic process tends to reflect alternative imaginaries through four key dimensions of data mapping practice—objectives, uses, production, and ownership. We argue that counter-data mapping is the new frontier of digital media activism and community communication, as it extends the projects of data justice and community media activism, generating new practices in the activist repertoire of communicative action.

  • 5.
    Jeppesen, Sandra
    et al.
    Lakehead University.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Introduction: Mapping questions of power and ethics in media activist research practices2020In: Media activist research ethics: Global approaches to negotiating power in social justice research / [ed] S. Jeppesen & P. Sartoretto, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Jeppesen, Sandra
    et al.
    Lakehead University, Canada.
    Sartoretto, PaolaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media activist research ethics: Global approaches to negotiating power in social justice research2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book maps complex ethical dilemmas in social justice research practices in media and communication. Contributors critically analyse power dynamics that arise when building equitable research relations with media activists, social movements, and cultural producers, considering issues of access, control, affective labour, reciprocal critiques, and movement pedagogies. Authors probe the ethical challenges faced when horizontal relations inadvertently create conflicts leading to oppressive communication; when affective demands generate non-reciprocal relations of care; and when participant anonymity has to be balanced with self-expression and voice. Chapters explore engagements with digital technologies in developing research relations, covering new research practices from horizontal collectives to dialogical auto-ethnography; from community scholarship and pedagogies to decolonising research. The book asks researchers to consider the complexities of ethical practices today in socially engaged global research within the neoliberal university.  

  • 7.
    Kalinina, Ekaterina
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Difficult choices: Application of feminist ethics of care in action research2020In: Media activist research ethics: Global approaches to negotiating power in social justice research / [ed] S. Jeppesen & P. Sartoretto, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 193-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses potential vulnerabilities conditioned by the pressure of an ethics of care placed on a researcher to stay empathetic with the subjects of study in action research with subcultures consisting of male-dominated groups, including how 24/7 access to social media and digital technologies augments possibilities for abuse. The author, and the subject of this chapter, is a female researcher who has conducted action research in a community of Russian hip-hop activists for a period of two years, during which she has played the double role of both project manager and researcher. The starting point of this project was to establish a horizontal organisational structure that would allow greater agency on the part of community members to influence both cultural actions and research processes. Applying auto-ethnography, the author addresses the following research questions: What are the potential implications of the use of a feminist ethics of care by a female researcher in relation to a male-dominated community when attempting to equalise power dynamics between the university and community? What kinds of problems might arise when the subjects of research overstep their agency to influence decision-making processes? How can media channels for internal communication be used (and abused) and what are the ethical implications for the researcher and the subjects of the research?

  • 8.
    Lundström, Markus
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The temporal nexus of collective memory mediation: print and digital media in Brazil’s Landless Movement 1984-20192022In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 453-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social movement scholarship has increasingly shown how continuous mobilization depends on collective memory construction. This article sets out to study this formative activity in a changing media landscape. It asks how activists navigate the temporal nexus of collective memory mediation. The empirical focus is on Brazil's Landless Rural Workers' Movement (MST), a well-established organization that since the early 1980s has communicated its collective memories on several media platforms. This article also demonstrates, through a corpus analysis of MST's internal newspaper, Jornal Sem Terra (1984-2014), and its Facebook page (2014-2019), how collective memories of rural violence serve various functions in these different media. The empirical study verifies the formative implication of rural violence for Brazil's landless movement, but also unveils notable differences between the newspaper and Facebook in this regard. Whereas Jornal Sem Terra employed a horizontal collective memory construction through contemporary documentation of ongoing and upcoming events, the Facebook posts primarily engaged in the vertical extraction of already established memories. In other words, the print media produced a narrative around collective memories of rural violence, and these memories were re-produced through digital media platforms. These empirical findings implicate that renewed methodologies are needed in future studies of social movements.

  • 9.
    Löfgren, Isabel
    et al.
    Södertörns University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Rosa, Ana Paula
    Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), São Leopoldo, Brazil.
    Das práticas à circulaçãode sentidos: olhares sobre amidiatização do processo eleitoralna Suécia e no Brasil [From practices to meaning circulation: insights about mediatization of elections in Sweden and Brazil]2023In: Midiatização, pandemia e eleições: Disputas e transformações nas discursividades contemporâneas / [ed] A. Weschenfelder, A. F. Neto & V. Borelli, Campina Grande, Paraíba: Eduepb , 2023, p. 347-372Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Leia o livro na íntegra (read the whole book in full text)
  • 10.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Communidade na pós-globalização: promessas e dívidas da revolução digital [Community in post-global times: promises and failures of the digital revolution]2023In: Espíritos utópicos: a regeneração do comum [Utopian Spirits - Regenerating the Commons] / [ed] L. Bulcão & C. H. Ribeiro dos Santos, São Roque: Gênio Editorial , 2023, p. 225-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Stockholm University.
    Naomi Schiller,  Challenging the State: Community Media and Popular Politics in Venezuela. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2018 [Book review]2019In: E.I.A.L. : Estudios Interdisciplinarios de America Latina y el Caribe, ISSN 0792-7061, E-ISSN 2226-4620, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 148-150Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    O lugar da cidadania no capitalismo comunicativo [Where is the citizen in communicative capitalism?]2020In: Revista de Comunicação Dialógica, E-ISSN 2674-9246, no 4, p. 60-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how citizen participation in politics through communicative action can be analysed departing from a critical appreciation of the concept of communicative capitalism. Despite its contribution to a critical analysis of online political participation, communicative capitalism has a mediacentric character and an ethnocentric bias. These limitations make it less useful as an analytical tool to assess the possibilities for citizen action in the context of commoditized communication. Communicative citizenship is thus proposed as concept that addresses the analytical limitations of communicative capitalism.

  • 13.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Caffagni, Lou
    Indigenous Communication in Brazil - between community representation and structural change2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Caffagni, Lou Guimarães Leão
    Universidade de São Paulo.
    Da Representação Cultural à Mudança Estrutural: O Problema da Comunicação Indígena no Brasil [From cultural representation to structural change: challenges in Indigenous communication in Brazil]2022In: Comunicação, questão Indígena emovimentos sociais: Reflexões Necessárias / [ed] L. Milhomens, Manaus, AM: EDUA - Editora da Universidade Federal do Amazonas , 2022, p. 39-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Custódio, Leonardo
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Dealing with ethical dilemmas in activist research on social movement media2020In: Media activist research ethics: Global approaches to negotiating power in social justice research / [ed] S. Jeppesen & P. Sartoretto, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 51-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses dilemmas and strategies in dealing with ethical risks in ethnographic research. Based on the authors’ research processes on social movement media in Brazil, we compare dilemmas arising from relationships—as Europe-based Brazilian researchers—with activists in Brazil. The widespread uses of digital media in political demonstrations and protests have created epistemological and methodological challenges to research on communication for development and social change. A key challenge lies in the relationship between the researchers and the researched. As Brazilian researchers in European institutions, we become mediators of knowledge about Brazil and Latin America among research communities in Europe, experiencing ethical dilemmas regarding how we represent the groups about which we do research. We compare our experiences researching the communicative processes and media practices in the Brazilian Landless Workers’ Movement and the trajectories in media activism of low-income youth in favelas of Rio de Janeiro, focusing on four different areas: (a) overcoming suspicion and resistance to researchers among activists; (b) justifying research to activists; (c) balance between science and advocacy; and (d) collaboration and dialogue. We conclude that by engaging in activist research, we become mediators between two realms of knowledge and action: academia and social movements.

  • 16.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Jeppesen, Sandra
    Media, Film, and Communications, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Smart Cities: A critical communication for social change intervention2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first pandemic of the datafied society, interactive COVID-19 data maps have entered citizen media diets, as governments and media communicate COVID-19 case counts through cartographic data visualizations. These are used by state and citizens alike to understand how contagion advances and retreats, assess mobility patterns, and monitor vaccination numbers. However, they are often based on non-comparable data types across countries, including varied reporting criteria and timeframes, leading to visual misrepresentations. Moreover, many pandemic data visualizations have had a negative impact on public debate and action, contributing to the infodemic of disinformation, stigmatizing marginalized groups, and detracting from social justice objectives. Counter to hegemonic maps, spatial representations developed through grassroots data appropriation have been redrawn by marginalized groups to reveal hidden inequalities and support calls for intersectional health justice. This paper investigates the counter-mapping imaginaries of community activists who use data to unveil realities and shape social meanings, focusing on three counter-mapping case studies–City Lab, Data4BlackLives, and Indigenous Emergency. We find that counter-mapping data imaginaries are deeply embedded in notions of spatiality and relationality across four dimensions of analysis: objectives, uses, production, and ownership. These findings help us to better understand how counter-data maps construct new social realities, through not just the maps themselves but also the processes of creating them, with the potential to support self-determined communities through cartographies of resistance.

  • 17.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kalinina, Ekaterina
    Communicative solidarity – networked resistance to neoliberalism in urban spaces2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we propose that solidarity networks in urban settings as a communicAction process can be understood politically as forging symmetric relations between communicating subjects through the appropriation of technologies and emergence of social technologies. Urbanization processes throughout the 20th century led to fragmentation of communities – dissociation between living and work, zoning of cities (live, work, study, consumption), as well as diminishing public spaces and urban areas where the main focus is not consumption. Coupled with post-industrial urbanization, neoliberalism has gained dominance as a political system with both local and global effects. Lives mediated by consumption and the individual biography as a market endeavor intensify in hyper mediatized urban centers. Furthermore, increasing precarization that reduces the security of contemporary life leading, for many, to precarious existences lacking the stability to plan their lives. These processes happen in a context of space schizophrenia (Santos, 2021) in which places are both singular and global, while citizenship is practically exercised to a great extent at the local level because global actors are anti-citizen. Fragmentation and breaking of connections are particularly visible in times of crises, however, at these times we can also see the need for these connections and how people act to (re) build these connections. This reconstruction can be understood as a communicative process structured by the constructions of communities as shared existence (Paiva, 2005). With the dismantling of the welfare state and the safety net it provides, individuals are left alone to self organize and solidarity the emerges as a strategy of action with practical and political aims to disrupt isolationism. Local solidarity enacted through communication becomes thus an expression of citizenship. Sociotechnical dispositives for citizen centered urban management – Refugees Welcome Stockholm, Transport a Sister – Help Ukraine, community gardens, community kitchens, compliance activism. In authoritarian regime, certain kinds of urban solidarity regime might be the only option that leaves a fissure for political organization.

  • 18.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Lundström, Markus
    Stockholm University.
    Memória coletiva e mobilização em um tempo atemporal2019In: Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias de la Comunicacion, E-ISSN 1807-3026, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Latin America has recently experienced acts of resistence in which digital platforms for social interaction characterised by accelerated communication flows have played a key role. We analyse how these digital platforms interplay with social movement activity through a discussion of temporalities and collectivie memory, the political opportunities offered by digital media, and how social movements nagivate them. The aim is to highlight how processes of collective memory construction transform in a time-space of constant material changes in archives and historical artifacts.

  • 19.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Stockholm University.
    Lundström, Markus
    Stockholm University.
    The Temporal Nexus of Mediated Collective Memory Construction2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Martins, L.
    Indigenous Cartographies in the Covid19 Pandemic2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For Indigenous populations in Brazil, maps are instruments of (in)visibility. Official maps have erased Indigenous territories and communities while cartographic representations have been a tool of resistance for Indigenous activists. These dynamics intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic when the spread of the virus among indigenous populations was poorly reported and absent from hegemonic contagion maps. Negligence from the state threatened the survival of communities around the country who organized collectively to create their own cartographic representations of the pandemic through resistant appropriations of media and data. 

    This paper draws on interviews with Indigenous leaders and media activists to discuss processes of data appropriation and resistant cartographies during the Covid 19 pandemic. Findings highlight the use of data and counter mapping strategies for self-representation and political action that must be understood through a non-media centric perspective, drawing from conceptualizations at the intersection between human geography, communication, and post-colonial theory. 

  • 21.
    Suzina, Ana Cristina
    et al.
    Loughborough University, London, UK.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Dossiê: Pensamento comunicacional latino-americano - desafios e perspectivas da des-ocidentalização no Sul Global, Volume II: Romper as fronteiras do conhecimento [Introduction: Special Issue: Latin American Communication Theory - de-westernisation challenges and perspectives in the Global South - Volume II - Breaking the Borders of Knowledge]2021In: Comunicação, Mídia e Consumo, ISSN 1806-4981, E-ISSN 1983-7070, Vol. 18, no 52, p. 192-196Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Suzina, Ana Cristina
    et al.
    Loughborough University, London, UK.
    Sartoretto, PaolaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Pensamento comunicacional latino-americano – desafios e perspectivas da des-ocidentalização no Sul Global [Special Issue Latin-American communicational thought - de-westernisation challenges and perspectives in the Global South]2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
1 - 22 of 22
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