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  • 1.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    A ‘success story’ unpacked: doing good and communicating do-gooding in the Videoletters Project2018In: Communication in international development: Doing good or looking good? / [ed] F. Enghel & J. Noske-Turner, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 21-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Videoletters Project was a high-profile case of international media assistance to the Western Balkans launched in 2005 with British and Dutch support. Its explicit goal was to promote large-scale reconciliation among ordinary citizens of the former Yugoslavia in the aftermath of the region's breakup. The project was welcomed internationally: reported on by the press, spotlighted and prized in documentary film festivals, and referred to in scholarly work and policy forums. This was despite the fact that its promise that it would mediate reconciliation via the making and broadcasting of a documentary was barely fulfilled. Based on a qualitative study of the project’s uses of communication to do good and to look good, this chapter considers how an international intervention that harnessed media for do-gooding shifted towards communicating the goodness of aid to donors’ own constituencies. It moreover raises questions for the future research of donors’ dual deployment of communication to do good and to look good.

  • 2.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Can your attention save lives? Development cooperation for human rights as digital business and moral fix2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers how the discourses of global governance institutions about the power of digital technologies to save the world frame the operations of Western human rights organizations (Chakravartty, 2006; Kleine, 2013; Wildermuth & Ngomba, 2016). Starting from a qualitative text analysis of recent World Bank and OECD reports -"Digital Dividends" (WB, 2016) and "The Sustainable Development Goals as Business Opportunities" (OECD, 2016)- I demonstrate the fit between these institutional discourses, the business-driven digitalization of international intervention, and human rights work via a case study of the Natalia Project. Launched in 2013 by a Swedish non-governmental organization funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, the project equips selected human rights activists at risk with a digitally-driven alarm system, and acts as convenor of an online network of the activists’ supporters via Facebook and Twitter under the motto “Your attention can save lives”. Based on the triangulation of project documentation and interviews to participating human rights as well as NGO staff, the paper interrogates the complex links between four inter-linked elements: a) the dangerous labour of local activists in countries where human rights are subject to violation, b) the donor-driven intervention at a distance of the Swedish NGO with the stated goal to protect these activists, c) the uncritical emphasis on the power of loose networks to gather protective response via social media, and d) the pilot-testing of surveillance gadgets by private business companies for market purposes in the context of a humanitarian intervention.

  • 3.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Can your attention save lives? Human rights intervention as digital business + social media as moral fix2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conference presentation considers how the discourses of global governance institutions about the power of digital technologies to save the world frame the operations of Western human rights organizations (Chakravartty, 2006; Kleine, 2013; Wildermuth & Ngomba, 2016). Starting from a qualitative text analysis of recent World Bank and OECD reports -"Digital Dividends" (WB, 2016) and "The Sustainable Development Goals as Business Opportunities" (OECD, 2016)- I demonstrate the fit between these institutional discourses, the business-driven digitalization of international intervention, and human rights work via a case study of the Natalia Project. Launched in 2013 by a Swedish non-governmental organization funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, the project equips selected human rights activists at risk with a digitally-driven alarm system, and acts as convenor of an online network of the activists’ supporters via Facebook and Twitter under the motto “Your attention can save lives”.

    Based on the triangulation of project documentation and interviews to participating human rights as well as NGO staff, the paper interrogates the complex links between four inter-linked elements: a) the dangerous labour of local activists in countries where human rights are subject to violation, b) the donor-driven intervention at a distance of the Swedish NGO with the stated goal to protect these activists, c) the uncritical emphasis on the power of loose networks to gather protective response via social media, and d) the pilot-testing of surveillance gadgets by private business companies for market purposes in the context of a humanitarian intervention.

  • 4.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and queer counterpublics in Latin America [book review)2018In: Journal of Communication, ISSN 0021-9916, E-ISSN 1460-2466, Vol. 68, no 3, p. E38-E40Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Latin American Communication Research in Dialogue with a High-Impact Academic Journal: Lessons Learnt and Future Strategies2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are we talking about when we refer to Latin American communication studies in Western academic circles? Do we mean knowledge produced in Latin America, by Latin Americans, for Latin America? Is it those canonical studies written by Latin American scholars, translated to English up to the 1990s and widely circulated in the US & Europe? Do we mean theory-built based on the investigation of Latin American specificities, regardless of where/how the knowledge is produced/put into use? Is there a distinct Latin American epistemology pertaining to the study of communication? Drawing on lessons learnt in the making of the Special Issue of Communication Theory (Volume 28 Issue 2) released in May 2018, we'll be discussing these issues.

  • 6.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Qué es e futuro?, o la relación entre comunicación, desarrollo sustentable y justicia social en el siglo XXI:: sures, nortes y desafíos2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Who’s reporting Africa now?: Non-governmental organizations, journalists, and multimedia2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 20, no 3, SI, p. 484-486Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Enghel, Florencia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Becerra, Martín
    Department of Social Sciences, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, and CONICET, Argentina.
    Here and There: (Re)Situating Latin America in International Communication Theory2018In: Communication Theory, ISSN 1050-3293, E-ISSN 1468-2885, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 111-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since their origins in the late 1950s, Latin American communication studies have become increasingly institutionalized and thematically diverse. This evolution, however, has circulated to a limited extent beyond borders, as noted by North American scholars in the 1990s. Attentive to this problem, this article reviews how Latin America has featured in Communication Theory’s archive since 1992 and introduces a Special Issue that incorporates recent contributions from the region into the journal’s corpus. The analysis shows the extremely limited presence of Latin America in Communication Theory both in terms of substantial contributions to theory-building arising from the region, and of Latin American authorship. We argue that this state of affairs evidences the need for explicit editorial policies aimed at addressing the gap, and for increased cross-border interaction among scholars. The Special Issue hereby introduced contributes to resituating Latin America in international communication theory by foregrounding situated approaches generated in the region.

  • 9.
    Enghel, Florencia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Becerra, MartínUniversidad Nacional de Quilmes & CONICET (Argentina).
    Special Issue: Latin American Communication Theory Today: Charting Contemporary Developments and Their Global Relevance2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Special Issue hereby introduced contributes to resituating Latin America in international communication theory by foregrounding situated approaches generated in the region.

  • 10.
    Enghel, Florencia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Danielsson, Magnus
    Department of Media and Journalism, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bad news: seeing communication for and about development through an exposé of Swedish aid to Zambia2019In: Journal of International Communication, ISSN 1321-6597, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 54-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication for and about development are significant components of international development cooperation, interlinked in practice though separated in research. This article examines their interaction in donor-driven aid through the lens of journalism. How is bilateral development cooperation communicated about in the news? How does a donor agency communicate for and about development? And what are the links between one and the other? In 2016, a prime-time exposé aired by the Swedish public TV reported on alleged corruption in aid to Zambia, depicting events as the double failure of donor and recipient. Our analysis clarifies how (a) how the news media in a top donor country covers public development aid for its citizen audiences; and (b) how a bilateral donor agency understands and practices communication as it interacts with the news media on the one hand, and with partners and beneficiaries on the ground on the other. We focus on the news media as mediator of the donor’s communication with its tax-paying citizen audiences, demonstrating the potential of an integrated conceptual approach to communication for and about development, and raising questions for future research. 

  • 11.
    Enghel, Florencia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Noske-Turner, JessicaUniversity of Leicester.
    Communication in international development: Doing good or looking good?2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International development stakeholders harness communication with two broad purposes: to do good, via communication for development and media assistance, and to communicate do-gooding, via public relations and information. This book unpacks various ways in which different efforts to do good are combined with attempts to look good, be it in the eyes of donor constituencies at large, or among more specific audiences, such as journalists or intra-agency decision-makers.

    Development communication studies have tended to focus primarily on interventions aimed at doing good among recipients, at the expense of examining the extent to which promotion and reputation management are elements of those practices. This book establishes the importance of interrogating the tensions generated by overlapping uses of communication to do good and to look good within international development cooperation.

    The book is a critical text for students and scholars in the areas of development communication and international development and will also appeal to practitioners working in international aid who are directly affected by the challenges of communicating for and about development.

  • 12.
    Enghel, Florencia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Noske-Turner, Jessica
    University of Leicester.
    Communication in international development: towards theorizing across hybrid practices2018In: Communication in international development: Doing good or looking good? / [ed] F. Enghel & J. Noske-Turner, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In international development cooperation, various stakeholders make use of communicationin order to promote a globally agreed agenda: multilateral, regional, andbilateral organisations; international and national civil society organisations; and theprivate sector, among others. These uses generally have one of two broad purposes:to do good, via communication for development and media assistance, and to communicatethe good done, via information and public relations. Instances in which bothpurposes are combined have remained under-researched.Little is known abouthow they overlap in practice, and therefore about how to address the tensions andcontradictions that may ensue from this overlap. The question of whether a primeconcern with making aid look good may override efforts to do good has not beensufficiently investigated until now.This edited collection starts from this question.

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