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  • 1.
    Antai, Imoh
    Department of Supply Chain Management & Corporate Geography, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    A theory of the competing supply chain: Alternatives for development2011In: International Business Research, ISSN 1913-9004, E-ISSN 1913-9012, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 74-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of a coherent methodology for supply chain vs. supply chain competition remains elusive in literature in terms of purpose, approaches and theoretical foundations. The purpose of this paper is to identify suitable theories of competition from which supply chain vs. supply chain competition may be further developed. Paper explores literature on competition theories, competition and its correlates and also considers the dichotomy between competitiveness and competition in relation to achievement of a competitive advantage in supply chains. An argument is made for the identification and development of theory that reflects the multidimensional, process-based and emergent properties of supply chains. Three competition theories from which supply chain vs. supply chain competition may begin to be conceptualized and possibly operationalized are identified. A chronological conceptualization of competition, competitiveness and competitive advantage, which is intuitive to the realization of competitive advantage in inter-supply chain competition, is also proposed.

  • 2.
    Antai, Imoh
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Market versus supply chain vs. supply chain competition: A systems approach to reconciling the perspectives for business2016In: / [ed] Lauri Ojala, Juuso Töyli, Tomi Solakivi, Harri Lorentz, Sini Laari, Ninni Lehtinen, Turku: University of Turku Press , 2016, p. 1-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrative account of market (economic) competition and supply chain vs. supply chain competition in order to discover how both perspectives of competition might fit together within the broader encompassing notion of business competition.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper explores the potential points of alignment between the two competition perspectives from their development through to their current standings. Literatures on the evolving supply chain vs. supply chain competition as well as market competition are thus explored.

    Findings

    Results show that the two perspectives of competition are more similar than expected and as such market competition and supply chain vs. supply chain competition may not be described as mutually exclusive alternatives to the concept of competition.

    Research limitations/implications (if applicable)

    The suggestions in this paper have implications for the discussion on how to deal with the competition interfaces (borders) that may be present in carrying out business as usual.

    Original/value

    The paper presents as one of the first studies of an integration of market competition and supply chain vs. supply chain competition, and thereby contributes to furthering our understanding of competition between supply chains and the different competition regimes that may exist within the business environment. This prospect is yet to be pointed out in literature.

  • 3.
    Antai, Imoh
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Supply chain vs supply chain competition: A niche-based approach2011In: Management Research Review, ISSN 2040-8269, E-ISSN 2040-8277, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1107-1124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptualization of supply chain vs supply chain competition using the ecological niche approach. It suggests a probabilistic methodology for evaluating competition from time series data, using overlap in the utilization of services provided by critical providers as a source of competition.

    Design/methodology/approach: Literature on ecological niche theory and competition is explored and given the uncertainty that surrounds the operation and management of supply chains, a probabilistic approach to the analysis of supply chain vs supply chain competition (via the Bayesian inference) is advocated. Simulated data are used to illustrate the methodology.

    Findings: Should an area of overlap be identified, ecological niche theory provides a sensible approach to identifying the nature and extent of competition between supply chains. Applicability of the methodology is not limited to supply chain vs supply chain competition.

    Research limitations/implications: The data used for the analysis of competition between supply chains are computer generated and use a single niche dimension. Although this was done to merely test/validate the proposed model, the approach is somewhat oversimplified. However, the model is readily extendable to multiple niche dimensions.

    Originality/value: The proposed approach offers a simple and straight-forward method of estimating competition in general, and supply chains vs supply chain competition in particular. Attempts at using the niche theory of competition in this context are so far inconspicuous. Hence, approaching competition in this way contributes to furthering our understanding of competitive interaction especially in supply chains, whose prospect is yet to be pointed out in literature.

  • 4.
    Antai, Imoh
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mutshinda, Crispin M.
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Health status assessment using reverse supply chain data2010In: Management Research Review, ISSN 2040-8269, E-ISSN 2040-8277, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest the use of reverse medical supply chain data to infer changes of a population's health status with regard to a focal disease. It includes a detailed illustration of how health status information can be obtained from drug reverse chains.

    Design/methodology/approach – A Bayesian dynamical model linking drug reverse supply chain data to relevant health status indicators with regard to a focal disease is developed. A detailed implementation of the model on computer‐simulated data is considered. The predictive ability of the methodology is also assessed using out‐of‐sample Monte Carlo‐based predictive analysis.

    Findings – The results substantiate the good fit of the model to the empirical data.

    Research limitations/implications – Difficulty in obtaining actual return data and in selecting appropriate health status indicators. The correspondence disease‐drug is typically not one‐to‐one. Experts' opinion is required in setting up suitable mixing weights as many drugs may inform the health status relative to a given disease and vice versa.

    Practical implications – Reverse logistics data may contain potential information, and this is not exclusive to medical chains.

    Originality/value – The paper's suggestions tend to reinforce the notion that supply chain data may be used in many unsuspected settings. Solutions to issues of immediate concern in public health require multidisciplinary cooperation, and this paper shows how supply chain management can contribute. It is believed that the potential of reverse chain data in the health status prospect has previously hardly ever been pointed out.

  • 5.
    Antai, Imoh
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Mutshinda, Crispin
    Mount Allison University.
    Owusu, Richard
    Linnaeus University.
    A 3-R principle for characterizing failure in relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters2015In: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 2042-6747, E-ISSN 2042-6755, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 234-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to introduce a 3R (right time, right place, and right material) principle for characterizing failure in humanitarian/relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters, and describes a Bayesian methodology of the failure odds with regard to external factors that may affect the disaster-relief outcome, and distinctive supply chain proneness to failure.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The suggested 3Rs combine simplicity and completeness, enclosing all aspects of the 7R principle popular within business logistics. A fixed effects logistic regression model is designed, with a Bayesian approach, to relate the supply chains’ odds for success in disaster-relief to potential environmental predictors, while accounting for distinctive supply chains’ proneness to failure.

    Findings

    – Analysis of simulated data demonstrate the model’s ability to distinguish relief supply chains with regards to their disaster-relief failure odds, taking into account pertinent external factors and supply chain idiosyncrasies.Research limitations/implications– Due to the complex nature of natural disasters and the scarcity of subsequent data, the paper employs computer-simulated data to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology.

    Originality/value

    – The 3R principle offers a simple and familiar basis for evaluating failure in relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters. Also, it brings the issues of customer orientation within humanitarian relief and supply operations to the fore, which had only been implicit within the humanitarian and relief supply chain literature.

  • 6.
    Antai, Imoh
    et al.
    Department of Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Olson, Hans
    Brains and Bricks Research Center, University of Linköping, Sweden.
    Interaction: a new focus for supply chain vs supply chain competition2013In: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, ISSN 0960-0035, E-ISSN 1758-664X, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 511-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Although the supply chain (SC) competition concept has emerged during the past decade as the way firms will compete in future, there is scant academic research on actual mechanisms through which such competition can occur. The purpose of this paper is to proposes interaction as the means by which competition between supply chains may be undertaken. Design/methodology/approach - The paper investigates a Swedish logistics center via case study methodology to develop the idea of interaction for SC vs SC competition. Findings - Results suggest that interaction points along organizations' supply chains may present enough breadth to assume a role in determining how SC vs SC competition may be played out in reality. Research limitations/implications - Interaction, as proposed here, implies an emphasis on all points at which supply chains meet to request goods and services, including various points where such supply chains converge, e.g. service providers, original equipment manufacturers, etc. Originality/value - Most studies dealing with competition between supply chains fall short of exploring the link between theory and corresponding practice of this evolving competition mode. Such a link is provided with the use of logistics centers.

  • 7.
    Kinra, Aseem
    et al.
    Department of Operations Management, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Antai, Imoh
    Department of Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Emerging logics of competition: Paradigm shift, fantasy, or reality check?2010In: Competitiveness Review: an international business journal, ISSN 1059-5422, E-ISSN 2051-3143, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 94-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to elicit the subtle but progressive shift in organizational/institutional interaction with its rivals within a competitive framework, and thereby discusses and analyses paradigm shifts in competition and competitiveness. The paper argues that interorganizational networks and the recent concept of supply chain management may have induced a change in how competitiveness is viewed at the national, industry, and firm levels of interaction.

    Design/methodology/approach - The paper conceptualizes extant literature into distinct themes of (organizational and institutional) analysis - micro, macro, and meso - and based on this review the paper seeks to identify emerging logics and shifts within mainstream competitiveness literature over the last decade.

    Findings - The paper suggests that the micro-macro theme of competition and competitiveness remains dominant in mainstream literature. Results from the analysis also support the notion of emergent logics of competition and competitiveness, which could then imply that a paradigm shift may well have begun within the area of competition and competitiveness.

    Research limitations/implications - The limited findings point towards more detailed forays into competition of interorganizational forms such as networks and supply chains, before a paradigm shift may be claimed.

    Practical implications - The paper serves to trigger the consciousness of stakeholders to think realistically with regards to claims that competition and competitiveness are carried out on the network level, e.g. a supply chain vs supply chain playing field.

    Originality/value - While networks and supply chains have generally been inferred as new frontiers for contemporary competition in different functionally-oriented literature domains, analysis and performance of such emergent logics is yet to be shown. The classification of different competition logics put forth in this paper aid in systemizing the competitiveness/competition rhetoric.

  • 8.
    Mutshinda, Crispin M.
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Antai, Imoh
    Department of Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography, Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration, Hanken, Helsinki, Finland.
    O'Hara, Robert B.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    A probabilistic approach to exposure risk assessment2008In: Stochastic environmental research and risk assessment (Print), ISSN 1436-3240, E-ISSN 1436-3259, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 441-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of hazardous substances into the environment has long been recognized as being a cause of several diseases in humans, wildlife, and plants. The damaging character of suspected contaminants is usually assessed via a "reject/retain" design with no explicit link between levels of exposure and intensities of the potential adverse health effects even though this connection may be important for the development of public health regulations that limit exposure to hazardous substances. Here, we propose a probabilistic approach to exposure risk assessment as a way around this typical flaw. We develop a Bayesian model using proximity to the source of an alleged contaminant as a surrogate for exposure. Subsequently, we carry out an experimental study based on simulated data to illustrate the model implementation with real world data. We also discuss a possible way of extending the model to accommodate potential heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of the focal disease.

  • 9.
    Owusu, Richard A.
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Mutshinda, Crispin M.
    Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Mount Allison University, Sackville, Canada.
    Antai, Imoh
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Dadzie, Kofi Q.
    J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Winston, Evelyn M.
    School of Business, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Which UGC features drive web purchase intent?: A spike-and-slab Bayesian Variable Selection Approach2016In: Internet Research, ISSN 1066-2243, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify user-generated content (UGC) features that determine web purchase decision making.

    Design/methodology/approach - The authors embed a spike-and-slab Bayesian variable selection mechanism into a logistic regression model to identify the UGC features that are critical to web purchase intent. This enables us to make a highly reliable analysis of survey data.

    Findings -The results indicate that the web purchase decision is driven by the relevance, up-to-dateness and credibility of the UGC information content.

    Research limitations/implications - The results show that the characteristics of UGC are seen as positive and the medium enables consumers to sort information and concentrate on aspects of the message that are similar to traditional word-of-mouth (WOM). One important implication is the relative importance of credibility which has been previously hypothesized to be lower in the electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) context. The results show that consumers consider credibility important as the improved technology provides more possibilities to find out about that factor. A limitation is that the data are not fully representative of the general population but our Bayesian method gives us high analytical quality.

    Practical implications - The study shows that UGC impacts consumer online purchase intentions. Marketers should understand the wide range of media that provide UGC and they should concentrate on the relevance, up-to-dateness and credibility of product information that they provide.

    Originality/value - The analytical quality of the spike-and-slab Bayesian method suggests a new way of understanding the impact of aspects of UGC on consumers.

  • 10.
    Polsa, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Spens, Karen
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Soneye, Alabi
    Department of Geography, University of Lagos, Nigeria.
    Antai, Imoh
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Comparing the perceived quality of private and public health services in Nigeria2011In: Journal of Management Policy and Practice, ISSN 1913-8067, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several countries services offered by private hospitals are considered to be superior to those of public hospitals. Research on the service quality in hospitals in developing countries is scarce, as is comparison of the customer-perceived quality of the two types of healthcare systems. The present study compares the perceived quality of private and public health services in Nigeria focusing on the capital Lagos. The results show distinctly positive perceptions of the service quality provided by both healthcare systems. However, when high-level hospitals were excluded, the scores for the private hospitals were higher. These findings are in line with earlier studies on hospitals in developed countries, but differ from previous findings on healthcare in developing countries.

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