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  • 1.
    Baù, Massimo
    University of Udine.
    Family Embeddedness and the Entrepreneurial Entry2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baboukardos, Diogenis
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Voluntary Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards and the Role of Family Ownership2014In: Co-operation Within and Amongst Family Businesses: Conference Proceedings: IFERA 2014 Annual Conference June 24-27, 2014, Lappeenranta, Finland, The International Family Enterprise Research Academy (IFERA) , 2014, p. 79-79Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hoskisson, Robert E.
    Rice University, USA.
    Pathak, Seemantini Madhukar
    University of Missouri, USA.
    Acquisition and Divestitures in Family and Non-Family Firms2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining the core-periphery model with family firm literature, we find that family firms exhibit unique acquisition and divestiture behaviors. Analyzing a sample of Swedish privately held limited companies we find that family firms acquire and divest distant, unrelated and larger but fewer businesses. In addition to economic objectives, family firms pursuing non-economic objectives prefer to buy and sell unrelated businesses at longer geographic distances to lower impact on their core business from their restructuring activities.

  • 4.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hoskisson, Robert E.
    Rice University, USA.
    Pathak, Seemantini Madhukar
    University of Missouri, USA.
    Portfolio Restructuring in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are family firms’ corporate restructuring behaviors distinct from those of non-family firms? Although the corporate restructuring literature has drawn on economic motives for restructuring, recent developments in the family business literature suggest that both economic and noneconomic motives may result in distinct restructuring behaviors between family and non-family firms. We use Swedish Census data and draw on a sample of privately held family and non-family Swedish firms for the period between 2004 and 2007. Applying the core- periphery model to the family-firm corporate-restructuring context, we posit that family firms undertake restructuring at the periphery of their business to lower the impact on their core business. Our results support our arguments and show that compared with non-family firms, family firms acquire and divest more geographically distant, unrelated and larger but fewer businesses.

  • 5.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Zahra, Shaker
    Carlson School of Management.
    Self-Employment Or Employment After Exit: The Effect Of An Entrepreneur’s Age And Gender2013In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2013 : Proceedings of the Thirty-third Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Andrew Zacharakis, Boston: Babson College , 2013, Vol. 33, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on career literature, we predict that an entrepreneur’s age at the time of re-entry has a unique and complex non-linear effect on the choice to become self-employed versus employed after an exit. Based on a database covering the whole Swedish population, we studied 79,356 entrepreneurs who experienced exit in a five year window (2000-2004) and we examined their career choice as self-employed versus employed. Our results show an inverted S-shaped curve which follows the career lifecycle stages (early, middle, and late). Also, we demonstrate that gender (man vs. woman) moderate the entrepreneur’s age/re-entry relationship.

  • 6.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Eddleston, Kimberly A.
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Becoming manager in a family firm: A gendered path2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women in business have been often described as invisible (Allen & Langowitz, 2003) resulting in calls for research to investigate women’s contributions to family firms (FF) (Martinez Jimenez, 2009). Female employees can legitimately accuse the existence of “glass ceiling” that prevent their advancement in the managerial ranks (Powell, 1999). Compared with male employees in equivalent positions, female employees may find that their perspectives are overlooked and their contributions devalued (Ridgeway et al., 2009).

    Our interest is in better understanding this discrimination and possible ways to change it. How do education, job tenure, job category and industry knowledge impact on the probability of being promoted to managerial positions in FF and non FF? How does gender moderate this probability?

    To answer these questions we employee a mixed method approach. In the quantitative part, we adopt a longitudinal dataset produced by Statistics Sweden with annual observations on all Swedish privately held firms, Swedish inhabitants, and family ties. This allow us to reconstruct the career path of all the employees that received a promotion to a managerial position in a Swedish company in the last 10 years. Our unique dataset allows us to match their salaries and career development recognizing the existence of gender discrimination. These results will be illustrated through a qualitative part, with interesting cases offering an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

    Our results confirm the existence of gender discrimination, for example in the salary paid by Swedish companies. Understanding the impact of educational choices, job categories and family choices on career paths for men and women, offers fundamental insights for managers, HR specialists, and policy makers. Moreover, it provides a unique opportunity for this interactive workshop to discuss the family business values, and how to develop a stronger family business responsibility against gender discriminations.

  • 7.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eddleston, Kimberly
    Northeastern University.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lucia, Naldi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Parental Altruism. Special Treatment for Offspring in Business?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Wennberg, K
    What do we know on firm succession and the entrepreneurial process: A Synthesis of the literature2010In: Long Term Perspectives on Family Business: Theory, Practice, Policy / [ed] Elias Hadjielias, Tom Barton, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wennberg, Karl
    Succession in Family Firms2013In: The Landscape of Family Business / [ed] Ritch L. Sorenson, Andy Yu, Keith H. Brigham and G. T. Lumpkin, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 167-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of succession in family firms is often both lengthy and complex, and is influenced by factors such as the personal goals of the owner-manager, family structure, ability and ambitions of potential successors, and legal and financial issues (Le BretonMiller, Miller, & Steier, 2004). Scholars of family business tend to emphasize what determines successful ownership and management succession involving family members and non-family stakeholders, alongside the general characteristics of effective succession (Handler, 1994; Le Breton-Miller et al., 2004; Sharma, Chrisman, & Chua, 2003a). A majority of privately held firms in many developed countries are likely to shift ownership as the owners approach retirement. Thus, from a public policy perspective, there is a need to study the conditions surrounding successful succession of family firms and the implications of these successions in the socio-economic context. This chapter presents a comprehensive review of the scholarly literature on ownership transition and management succession in family firms. We found that most of the literature on succession is conceptual or relies on a small number of cases and/or surveys based on convenience samples. For instance, 71 percent of the work published since the mid-1970s consists of descriptive investigations based on aggregated data or micro studies of firm succession based on small samples or a small number of illustrative cases. We see a need for more studies about the effects of succession on long-term development in privately held firms and how succession affects economic outcomes at different levels of analysis (Yu, Lumpkin, Sorenson, & Brigham, 2012).* We conducted a literature review based upon a cluster analysis that identifies four levels of analysis that dominate the current literature on succession. These levels are important for understanding transition processes and allow us to identify three main areas that offer particular interesting avenues for future research. First, succession involves, among other things, the goals and options of several actors: The individual owners and managers, the family members, the economic environment, and the potential successors, to varying degrees, who may influence the transition process. We discuss this multilevel perspective within the context of the conceptual literature. Although it is adopted in some qualitative studies, multilevel quantitative research is generally scarce. Because succession is an inherently multilevel phenomenon, we argue that empirical research must also adopt a multilevel perspective. Second, we note that succession research focuses primarily on management transitions. In contrast, ownership transfer has received much less attention. For many small- and medium-sized enterprises (including family businesses), these two transitions go hand in hand (Handler, 1994).1 Yet, there are reasons to single out and more closely examine ownership transition that involves not only financial issues and asset valuation, but also emotional issues such as perceived fairness among involved actors, which may represent the most critical part of a succession. Third, our review shows that suitable analytical techniques and representative sampling methods are lacking. There is an increased need for generalizable empirical evidence that can be used to test the limits and boundary conditions of different theoretical models, and to generate insights for owners, managers, and policy-makers. The chapter is organized as follows. In section two, we describe the methodology. Section three reviews the extant research and discusses a selection of articles represented within the categories identified in the cluster analysis. Section four uses these insights to highlight some avenues for future research that would help to fill some of the research gaps identified by our review and analysis. We highlight areas worthy of future inquiry and discuss some of the methodological issues that need to be addressed to further the research in this area. Section five provides a brief conclusion.

  • 10. Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Entrepreneurial Entry and the Family Dimension: A Family Embeddedness Analysis2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family embeddedness and the family capital2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Family embeddedness and the family capital2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    A Family Embeddedness Perspective on the Entrepreneurial Entry Process: Operationalization and Consequences2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Roots to grow: Family firms and local embeddedness in rural and urban contexts2018In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Eddleston, Kimberly
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States.
    Special Issue: “Career issues in family business: Understanding career ladders and glass ceilings” call for papers2016In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 272-273Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Baù, Massimo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of St. Gallen & University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Eddleston, Kimberly A.
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Fail but try again? The effects of age, gender, and multiple-owner experience on failed entrepreneurs’ reentry2017In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 909-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate what leads failed entrepreneurs to reenter entrepreneurship by taking a developmental career perspective. Specifically, we hypothesize that the age of failed entrepreneurs has a non-linear relationship with the likelihood of reentering entrepreneurship that follows different career stages (early, middle, and late). The gender of failed entrepreneurs and multiple-owner experience in the failed firm are hypothesized to be moderators of this relationship. We test our hypotheses using a database consisting of the Swedish population, including 4,761 entrepreneurs who failed between 2000 and 2004. Analyzing their career paths over the years following their failure offers support for our theoretical expectations.

  • 17.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Karlsson, M.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    No Firm is an Island: Local Embeddedness and Rural-Urban Contexts for Business Growth in Family versus non-Family Firms.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Financial Distress in Family and Non-Family-Controlled Firms2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 12016 / [ed] John Humphreys, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we heed the call from a growing number of scholars to extend our understanding of performance differences between family and non-family firms. Drawing on the mixed gamble logic of the behavioral agency model and the socioemotional wealth prospective, we provide a more fine-grained understanding of the unique role and diverse logic of dominant owners in relation to performance outcomes. Our findings suggest that family firms are the worst among the best (i.e. among firms that do not experience financial distress, they perform worse) and the best among the worst (i.e. among firms that experience financial distress, they perform better), which we attribute to the fact that family owners have more firm specific current wealth to lose (including not only financial wealth but also SEW), and as such respond differently to financial distress.

  • 19.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Is the Family an "Asset" or "Liability" for Firm Performance? The Moderating Role of Environmental Dynamism2014In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 210-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By integrating the stewardship and agency perspectives, our study extends the understanding of the dynamics that regulate the family as either an asset or liability for the firm. Our results show that the percentage of family members on the top management team (TMT) has an inverted U-shaped relationship with firm performance. However, when environmental dynamism is low this curvilinear relationship becomes steeper. When environmental dynamism is high, an increased percentage of family members on the TMT enhances firm performance.

  • 20.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Is the Family an Asset or Liability? The Role of Environmental Dynamism on Family Firm Performance2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Socioemotional Wealth and Innovation in Family Firms: When the Environment Gets Tough, the Family Gets Going!2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Chirico, Francesco
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Pathak, Seemantini
    University of Missouri, St. Louis, USA.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hoskisson, Robert
    Rice University, USA.
    Family versus Non-Family Firm Mergers: Likes Attract Likes, Outperform Opposites2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using social identity theory, we examine how the identity of the target firm in a family firm-led merger impacts the merged entity’s subsequent performance. We compare family firms’ target preferences and postmerger performance to those of non-family firms, and find that not only are family firms more likely to prefer other family firms as merger partners, but also achieve better post-merger outcomes with them. We test our hypotheses using a large sample of Swedish private firms, which largely controls for national cultural differences. After controlling for endogeneity and self-selection bias, our results support all our hypotheses.

  • 23. Compagno, C
    et al.
    Lauto, G
    Baù, Massimo
    Le risorse e i fattori motivazionali abilitanti il Trasferimento Tecnologico2010In: Le risorse immateriali nell'economia delle aziende: I. Profili di management / [ed] L. MARCHI, S. MARASCA, Il Mulino , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24. Compagno, C.
    et al.
    Visintin, F.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Baù, Massimo
    Fornasier, E.
    Lauto, G
    Mazzurana, P
    Cagnina, M
    Chiarvesio, M
    Misurare le performance innovative di un sistema regionale2011Book (Other academic)
  • 25. Giancarlo, Lauto
    et al.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Compagno, Cristiana
    The role of researchers’ motivations in the genesis of academic spin-off companies2013In: Conceptual Richness and Methodological Diversity in Entrepreneurship Research / [ed] Alain Fayolle, Paula Kyrö, Tonis Mets and Urve Venesaar, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 32-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spin-off companies play a key role in the mechanisms that universities enact to extract the industrial and commercial potential of the outcomes of scientific knowledge (Rothaermel et al., 2007). Ventures founded by scientists to exploit their discoveries and inventions are a powerful driver of innovation and economic growth, and represent a source of industrial change (Shane, 2004). For these reasons, science policy includes technology transfer among the “missions” of scientific profession, together with research and teaching (Etzkowitz, 2003).The activation of entrepreneurial process in academia is contingent on the interplay of factors at three distinct levels (Grimaldi et al., 2011): national and regional system of innovation, university strategy, and individual determinants. The literature has focused mainly on the first two dimensions, while the amount of attention given to the drivers for individual determinants is more scarce and recent (for example Colyvas and Powell, 2007; Jain et al., 2009; Clarysse et al., 2011).

  • 26.
    Iyer, Dinesh N.
    et al.
    Rutgers University, School of Business, Camden, NJ, USA.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Tecnológico de Monterrey, EGADE Business School, Mexico.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Management and Operations, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA.
    Brush, Thomas H.
    Krannert School of Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
    The triggers of local and distant search: Relative magnitude and persistence in explaining acquisition relatedness2018In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on problemistic search has assumed negative attainment discrepancy to be the trigger of both local and distant search. Extending this research, we present and compare two additional triggers: (1) relative attainment discrepancy, which reflects how much a firm's attainment discrepancy deviates from its past negative attainment discrepancies; and (2) persistent attainment discrepancy, which reflects how often the firm experiences below-aspirations performance. Our triggers for distant search model a behavioral explanation for the timing and relatedness of acquisitions. We find support for baseline arguments of problemistic search whereby firms increase both industry- and skill-related acquisitions when they perform below aspirations. When they persistently perform below aspirations, however, this likelihood is reduced and firms engage in acquisitions that are more unrelated, thereby providing support for the notion of expanding search boundaries from local to distant search. Of the two triggers of distant search proposed, relative attainment discrepancy does not induce firms to expand search boundaries. Our results indicate that persistent attainment discrepancy is a key construct to consider when studying the expansion of search boundaries.

  • 27. Lauto, G
    et al.
    Baù, Massimo
    Compagno, C
    Academic entrepreneurship and scientific research: synergy or tradeoff?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28. Lauto, G
    et al.
    Baù, Massimo
    Compagno, C
    The effects of participation to academic spin-offs on scientific productivity2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29. Lauto, Giancarlo
    et al.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Compagno, Cristiana
    Individual and institutional drivers of technology transfer in open innovation2013In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 27-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open innovation perspective offers a powerful framework which can be used in developing an understanding of the relationships that are established between academia and industry in the process of technology transfer. This paper develops a fourfold classification of technology transfer activities based on consultancy and the protection of intellectual property rights, and identifies the factors characterizing each activity. An empirical study was conducted with a sample of 249 researchers affiliated to Italian universities and the results indicate that specific forms of technology transfer are associated with particular configurations of regional systems of innovation, academic organizations and the motivations of researchers. The authors find that exchanges of tacit knowledge benefit from social interaction, while those based on codified knowledge are less context-dependent. In addition, more complex forms of technology transfer – those combining tacit and codified knowledge – require a broader endowment of resources, at both individual and contextual levels.

  • 30.
    Lauto, Giancarlo
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche, Italy.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Compagno, Cristiana
    Università degli Studi di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche, Italy.
    Individual and institutional drivers of technology transfer in open innovation2015In: Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Exchange / [ed] Jay Mitra, John Edmondson, London: Routledge, 2015, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 27-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open innovation perspective offers a powerful framework which can be used in developing an understanding of the relationships that are established between academia and industry in the process of technology transfer. This paper develops a fourfold classification of technology transfer activities based on consultancy and the protection of intellectual property rights, and identifies the factors characterizing each activity. An empirical study was conducted with a sample of 249 researchers affiliated to Italian universities and the results indicate that specific forms of technology transfer are associated with particular configurations of regional systems of innovation, academic organizations and the motivations of researchers. The authors find that exchanges of tacit knowledge benefit from social interaction, while those based on codified knowledge are less context-dependent. In addition, more complex forms of technology transfer – those combining tacit and codified knowledge – require a broader endowment of resources, at both individual and contextual levels.

  • 31.
    Mazzurana, P
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche Università degli studi di Udine.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Accordi strategici: analisi delle determinanti di successo e insuccesso: Il caso Sedia spa2012In: Microimpresa, ISSN 1590-0797, Vol. 29, p. 45-65Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32. Minola, T.
    et al.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    De Massis, A.
    Behind Slack and Firm Performance: The Moderating Roles of Family Ownership and High-Tech Industry2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Minola, Tommaso
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Bergamo.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Lancaster University Management School.
    Organizational Slack and Firm Performance in Family Firms: the Role of Family Involvement and Technological Intensity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Minola, Tommaso
    et al.
    University of Bergamo, Italy.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    De Massis, Alfredo
    Free U. Bozen, Bolzano and Lancaster U..
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Slack and Financial Performance in SMEs: Slack Discretion, Family Ownership, and Hi-Tech Sectors2017In: Academy of Management Proceedings January 2017 (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 16406, Academy of Management , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following intensive recent debates, the literature still offers ambiguous results on the ultimate effect of slack resources on firm performance, particularly in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We address this gap by examining how two different types of slack resources (high- and low-discretion slack) affect firm performance and how these relationships are moderated by family ownership and by operating in a high-tech industry. Using a sample of 8,345 Italian SME we show that slack is not always beneficial to firm performance and that the slack-performance relationship is contingent on both internal and external factors.

  • 35.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family Involvement and Innovation in Family Firms: The Moderating Role of Environmental Munificence2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Wennberg, Karl
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    An Entrepreneurial Process Perspective on Succession in Family Firms2013In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 1087-1122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review and analyze previous literature on succession in family firms from an entrepreneurial process perspective. Through a three-step cluster analysis of 117 published articles on succession in family firms published between 1974 and 2010, we find several themes within which succession can be understood from an entrepreneurial process perspective where both the entry of new owners and exit of old owners are associated with the pursuit of new business opportunities. We identify gaps within each cluster and develop a set of research questions that may guide future research on succession as an entrepreneurial process. Since succession involves implications for individuals, families and firms, we suggest researchers should adopt a multilevel perspective as they seek answers to these research questions. Our review and analysis also underlines the need to focus on ownership transition rather than only management succession, and the importance of carefully defining both succession and family firm.

  • 37. Pittino, Daniel
    et al.
    Visintin, F
    Baù, Massimo
    Corporate governance and CEO turnover in insider dominated systems: Are family firms different?2009In: Book of proceedings: global perspectives on family business developments : theory, practice, policy / [ed] Poutziouris P., Hadjielias E., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Pittino, Daniel
    et al.
    Visintin, F
    Baù, Massimo
    Corporate governance e innovazione di prodotto nelle PMI italiane, l’influenza del regime tecnologico2012In: Strategie per il Family Business: Passaggio Generazionale, Governo e Crescita / [ed] Cassia L., & De Massis A., Este , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Pittino, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Italy.
    Visintin, Francesca
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Italy.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mazzurana, Paola
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Italy.
    Collaborative technology strategies and innovation in family firms2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 17, no 1/2/3, p. 8-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the fundamental importance of innovation capabilities for firms 'competitiveness worldwide, in this paper we contribute to filling the research gap in the literature on the innovation processes carried out by family firms, focusing in particular on product innovation strategies. We first assess whether family firms, compared with non-family firms, are more likely to engage in explorative or exploitative innovation strategies; then, we focus on the way family firms manage their access to technology (technology sourcing) to pursue product innovation strategies, evaluating: 1) the extent to which family firms activate external networking strategies to carry out product/service innovation; 2) which kind of networking strategy, exploration-or exploitation-oriented, is more likely to be implemented by family firms. Our results suggest that family firms, compared with non-family firms, rely more on exploration-oriented alliances; the technology sourcing strategy tends to shift towards exploitation goals as organisational knowledge codification and formalisation take place.

  • 40.
    Sieger, Philipp
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Baù, Massimo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The King is Dead, Long Live...Who? Sudden Deaths of Owner-Managers and Successor Characteristics' Performance Implication2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the owner-manager of a business suddenly dies, who should take over? We address this fundamental but unanswered question by investigating how specific CEO successor characteristics and factors related to their relationships with the firm and the deceased ownermanager affect a firm’s performance distress after the incumbent ownermanager’s sudden death. Drawing on the resource-based view and information asymmetry literature and using a longitudinal sample from Sweden with over 1’500 sudden death events in the period 2000-2007, we reveal multiple interesting findings which offer important implications for theory and practice.

  • 41.
    Wennberg, Karl
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Baù, Massimo
    University of Udine.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Succession in private firms as an entrepreneurial process: a review and a research agenda2010Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 41 of 41
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