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  • 1. Al-Saqaf, Walid
    et al.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    How Do Social Media Users Link Different Types of Extreme Events to Climate Change?: A Study of Twitter During 2008–20172019In: Journal of Extreme Events, ISSN 2345-7376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how three types of extreme events (heat waves, droughts, floods) are mentioned together with climate change on social media. English-language Twitter use during 2008–2017 is analyzed, based on 1,127,996 tweets (including retweets). Frequencies and spikes of activity are compared and theoretically interpreted as reflecting complex relations between the extreme event factor (the occurrence of an extreme event); the media ecology factor (climate-change oriented statements/actions in the overall media landscape) and the digital action factor (activities on Twitter). Flooding was found to be by far the most tweeted of the three in connection to climate change, followed by droughts and heat waves. It also led when comparing spikes of activity. The dominance of floods is highly prevalent from 2014 onwards, triggered by flooding events (extreme event factor), the climate science controversy in US politics (media ecology factor) and the viral power of celebrities’ tweets (digital action factor).

  • 2.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Den globala journalistiken2019In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Michael Karlsson & Jesper Strömbäck, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 2, p. 433-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Few-to-many communication: Public figures' self-promotion on Twitter through 'joint performances' in small networked constellations2016In: Annales. Series Historia et Sociologia, ISSN 1408-5348, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to examine how members of a Twitter elite act together on a raised platform, thus performing “before” their manifold followers/audiences. A discourse study of Swedish public fi gures’ Twitter activities resulted in the identifi cation of three discourse types: expert sessions, professional “backstage” chatting, and exclusive lifestreaming. Altogether, they demonstrate how nationally recognized politicians, journalists, and PR consultants socialize on Twitter in a top-down manner that works against broader participation. This “elite collaborative” tweeting can be conceptualized as a particular mode of mass communication, namely few-to-many.

  • 4.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Kritisk diskursanalys2019In: Metoder i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap / [ed] M. Ekström & B. Johansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 3, p. 225-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Örebro universitet.
    Nyheter som antingen inrikes eller utrikes, eller både och?2016In: Journalistik i förändring: Om Mediestudiers innehållsanalys 2007 och 2014 / [ed] Lars Truedson, Stockholm: Stiftelsen Institutet för mediestudier , 2016, p. 130-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Smileys Without Borders: A Critique of Transboundary Interaction Between Politicians, Journalists and PR practitioners on Social Media2018In: TripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 18-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to contribute a critical theoretical understanding of cross-professional relations on social media, focusing on politicians, journalists and PR practitioners. It is well known that these professional groups establish personal and close relations in offline contexts, but more attention needs to be paid to the role of social media. Here, it is argued that in the context of digital media use, semi-private chatting, humour, and mutual acknowledgment, including the use of likes, smileys, heart symbols, etc., are evidence of a ‘neoliberalisation’ of cross-professional relations. The underlying idea is that the common practice of self-branding undermines representations of professional belonging and exacerbates the blurring of professional boundaries. The critical conceptualisation of such ‘transboundary’ interaction between politicians, journalists and PR practitioners, which is guided by a culturalmaterialist approach, includes the presentation of examples deriving from the Swedish Twittersphere, and suggestions for empirical research.

  • 7.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Time for the rise of global journalism2018In: Watchdog for the future: the journalist as pioneer of a new global narrative, Stockholm: Global Challenges Foundation , 2018, p. 53-57Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Ekström, Mats
    Moberg, Ulla
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Pressen sviker sin roll2010In: Nerikes Allehanda, no 2010-09-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Gearing, Amanda
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    The Panama and Paradise Papers. The Rise of a Global Fourth Estate2018In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 12, p. 4573-4592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article theorizes the work of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). This work is motivated by the need to link recent large-scale ICIJ projects such as the Panama and Paradise Papers revelations to ongoing theoretical discussions about emergent forms of journalism. It is argued that the ICIJ provides evidence of the emergence of a “global network journalism” characterized by a particular epistemology (a global outlook on social reality) that is embedded in a networked rationale. It is further suggested that this journalistic practice paves the way for the media’s role as a global fourth estate, responding to the budding demand for a new type of reporting that influences political decisions and expressing society’s development toward an internalized sense of globalization. We discuss the usefulness of applying the presented concepts to other cases than the ICIJ and provide suggestions for further studies.

  • 10. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Individualisation and nationalisation of the climate issue: two ideological horizons in Swedish news media2009In: Climate change and the media / [ed] Tammy Boyce, Justin Lewis, New York: Peter Lang Publishing , 2009, p. 211-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Environmental Sociology Section, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media’s coverage of wildfires in three continents2019In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region, and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analysed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

  • 12.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Global journalism2019In: The international encyclopedia of journalism studies / [ed] Tim P. Vos & Folker Hanusch, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global journalism appears to become increasingly important in the field of journalism studies, however, there is no agreement about how it should be applied in research. This entry presents four perspectives: the global-mapping perspective, which is concerned with mapping and analyzing how journalism works in different parts of the world; the media-technology perspective, which focuses on the potential of cross-border media technology to facilitate the creation of a global public sphere; the ethics perspective, which deals with how journalism should approach other cultures in order to reduce the distance between "us" and "them" and minimize stereotypical depictions of the Other; and the discourse perspective, which associates global journalism with reporting that sheds light on the multitude of cross-border interdependencies between people, processes, and events. The entry also discusses the positions of "globalists" and "skeptics" in the media globalization debate and the role of journalism education in the development of global journalism.

  • 13. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Individualization and nationalization of the climate issue: two ideological horizons in Swedish news media2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Intentional and unintentional transnationalism: two political identities repressed by national identity in the news media2011In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how the powerful mechanisms of nation-state discourse in the news media obscure emerging constructions of transnational political thought and action. With the aid of empirical examples from qualitative media studies on critical events extensively covered by the news media, the article demonstrates how national identity in the news media represses transnational political identities of the intentional as well as the unintentional kind.

  • 15. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Intentional and unintentional transnationalism: two political identities repressed by national media2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    "Klimatfrågans död till stor del mediernas fel"2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, no 5 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Kritisk diskursanalys2008In: Mediernas språk / [ed] Mats Ekström, Malmö: Liber, 2008, 1, p. 121-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Olausson, UlrikaÖrebro University, Sweden.
    Mediesamhället: Centrala begrepp2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idag ökar medvetenheten om mediernas viktiga roll i samhället inom olika vetenskapliga discipliner. Denna bok möter det växande kunskapsbehovet genom att på ett pedagogiskt sätt presentera en rad olika perspektiv på mediesamhället, eller närmare bestämt relationen mellan medier och samhälle; hur de förra inverkar på och medskapar det senare. Författarna tar bland annat upp frågan om vilken mediernas roll är för skapandet av maktförhållanden, offentligheter, identiteter, mobilitet, risker och interaktiva processer. Vad finns det för forskning om detta, och hur kan man inkludera medierna i sin egen samhällsforskning?Denna introduktion till studier om mediesamhället riktar sig till studenter, lärare och forskare inom medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, men också till andra samhällsvetenskapliga discipliner. Boken är skriven av medie- och kommunikationsvetare från sju universitet och högskolor i Sverige.Redaktörer är Peter Berglez och Ulrika Olausson, Örebro universitet. Övriga medverkande är: Ester Appelgren, Ulf Buskqvist, Jesper Falkheimer, Heike Graf, Mats Heide, Birgitta Höijer, André Jansson, Stig-Arne Nohrstedt, Tobias Olsson och Linda Ryan Bengtsson.

  • 19. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Miljön, forskningen - och så medie- och kommunikationsforskningen2011In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 83-86Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Social representations of climate change in the media and among citizens2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    The 'climate threat' as ideology: interrelations between citizen and media discourses2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    The structural repression of the transnational: social representations of the nation-state in the news media2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Towards a renewed Research Agenda for Media Studies on Climate Change2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    What is Sustainable Journalism?: An introduction2017In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, Our Common Future, the report from the UN World Commission on Environment and Development (also known as the Brundtland Report), pointed out economic growth, environmental protection and social equality as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be balanced and reconciled. Economic growth is in this sense necessary for a developing world, but a one-sided focus on economy will eventually lead to a world that is both socially and environmentally poorer. Obviously, the issue of sustainability has not been absent from the field of journalism research; on the contrary, there is plenty of research focusing on journalism and environmental sustainability (e.g., climate change, fracking, renewables, etc.), social sustainability (e.g., democratic and political participation, poverty, inequality), and economic sustainability (e.g., ownership, commercialization, business models). However, where journalism studies traditionally treat these three aspects of sustainability disjointedly, this book attempts to pull them closer together and integrally approach sustainable development in its environmental, social and economic sense.

    The book departs from the premise that journalism has a role to play in global sustainable development—to inform, investigate and to educate in ways that reconcile the three pillars. It also raises questions about the internal sustainability of journalism itself, asking how its rampant need for economically sustainable business models can possibly be negotiated with its social and environmental obligations and impacts. In this way, the concept of sustainable journalism interlinks two current sustainability challenges that are of great theoretical relevance and in urgent need of empirical research.

  • 25.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, UlrikaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.Ots, MartJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, the Brundtland Report pointed out economic growth, social equality and environmental protection as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be reconciled. However, usually, scholars interested in the business crisis of the media industry tend to leave the social and environmental dimensions of journalism aside, and vice versa. What Is Sustainable Journalism? is the first book that discusses and examines the economic, social and environmental challenges of professional journalism simultaneously. This unique book and fresh contribution to the discussion of the future of journalism assembles international expertise in all three fields, arguing for the necessity of integral research perspectives and for sustainable journalism as the key to long-term survival of professional journalism. The book is relevant for scholars and master’s students in media economy, media and communication, and environmental communication.

  • 26.
    Gearing, Amanda
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The microcosm of global investigative journalism: Understanding cross-border connections beyond the ICIJ2019In: Journal of Applied Journalism and Media Studies, ISSN 2001-0818, E-ISSN 2049-9531, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigative journalism across national borders is well known for the large projects, initiated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), with hundreds of reporters in many countries who collaborate to produce coverage such as the Panama Papers. However, there are also many examples in the field of global investigative journalism that are microcosms of their larger counterparts. These smaller or ‘microcosm’ cross-border collaborations are instigated and carried out by a small group of reporters, possibly including freelance reporters. Like their larger counterparts, ‘microcosm investigations’ can also lead to sociopolitical change and thus are deservedly classified as investigative journalism. Microcosm investigations can therefore be viewed as part of a suggested global fourth estate that is calling power to account. The purpose of the article is to examine the characteristics of ‘microcosm’-oriented global investigative journalism and to demonstrate the similarities and differences compared with its larger and more visible counterpart. The empirical material consists of interviews with Australian journalists who were shortlisted as finalists and who won national journalism awards, sponsored by the Walkley Foundation. The findings indicate that new technologies that enable cross-border collaboration are enabling the emergence of a global fourth estate. In the concluding discussion it is argued that for the expansion and mainstreaming of global investigative journalism, the multiple small-scale projects undertaken should collectively be viewed as equally important, if not more important, than the fewer but larger and better-known collaborations. Microcosm collaborations offer opportunities for the proliferation of cross-border media coverage that can be accomplished even by relatively small media outlets.

  • 27.
    Konow-Lund, Maria
    et al.
    School of Journalism, Media, and Culture, Cardiff University.
    Gearing, Amanda
    Independent Investigative Journalist.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Transnational cooperation in journalism2019In: Oxford research encyclopedia of communication, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The journalism industry has used technology and cooperation to convey information around the world since the mid-1800s when six American newspapers aligned to form the Associated Press. The nonprofit news agency was a business collaboration that allowed members to share content with one another. Cooperation in journalism was not always compatible with the industry’s traditional business model, however, which valued exclusivity. As technology progressed, cooperation grew ever easier and more productive. The ultimate emergence of the internet has consummated this trend, facilitating collaborations among groups of reporters across the globe. These collaborations allow individual groups to retain and capitalize upon their geographical exclusivity while enhancing their collective ability to provide domestic stories with a transnational context or to cover cross-border or even global issues.

  • 28.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media and climate change: Four long-standing research challenges revisited2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests some further avenues of empirical and theoretical investigation for media research on climate change. “Old” suggestions, whose significance, as we see it, needs to be further reinforced, are included, as are “new” ones, which we hope will generate innovative research questions. In order to integrate the analysis with knowledge generated by media research at large, we revisit four research challenges that media scholars have long grappled with in the investigation of journalism: (1) the discursive challenge, i.e. the production, content and reception of media discourse; (2) the interdisciplinary challenge, i.e. how media research might engage in productive collaboration with other disciplines; (3) the international challenge, i.e. how to achieve a more diverse and complex understanding of news reporting globally; and (4) the practical challenge, i.e. how to reduce the theory–practice divide in media research.

  • 29.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media and Climate Change: Four Long-standing Research Challenges Revisited2016In: Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading? / [ed] Olausson, Ulrika & Berglez, Peter, Routledge, 2016, p. 111-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading?2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 139-141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, PeterJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media research on climate change: Where have we been and where are we heading?2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Stor risk att allt fler kommer att strunta i klimatfrågan2010In: Dagens Nyheter, no 2010-11-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    The post-political condition of climate change: an ideology approach2014In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 54-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have argued that environmental discourse in general and climate change discourse in particular have contributed to a post-politicization of the public sphere, meaning there is now an absence of deeper conflicting viewpoints about the future direction of society; capitalism has been naturalized as the only conceivable option for the organization of socio-political-ecological life. The aim of the study is to empirically explore the ways in which the post-political condition of climate change is established in public discourse. Applying an ideology-theoretical approach to a focus-group study with Swedish citizens, the article analyzes how the post-politicization of the climate issue is shaped by 1) belief in a “climate threat,” 2) personal experiences of a “climate threat,” and 3) integration of a “climate threat” into everyday practices. We conclude that the post-politicization of climate change could be explained by a consensual discourse constituted by the particularization of climate change causes, a lack of passionate emotions, and “neurotic” micro-political action.

  • 34.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Towards a renewed agenda for media research on climate change2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Towards a renewed research agenda for media research on climate change2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Towards a research agenda for sustainable journalism2016In: ECREA 2016 abstract book, Prague: Czech-In , 2016, p. 415-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Towards a Research Agenda for Sustainable Journalism2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ots, Mart
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Sustainable news media: Organizational reconciliation of economic, democratic, and environmental challenges in media firms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the role of media industries in the realization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development. Based on prior research on media industries, the paper starts by outlining the established view of this complex business context and its contradictory objectives. We then systematize this in a tentative framework of media business objectives in relation to the Agenda 2030 goals, and finally propose a research agenda. In future versions of this paper we will complement this framework with case study data on Sustainable Management Practices at the largest Nordic media houses. This entails how managers understand and interpret the meaning of sustainability in the media context and media’s role for agenda 2030, but also how they operationalize and organize this in business practices.

  • 39.
    Schäfer, Mike
    et al.
    University of Zürich, Switzerland.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Wessler, Hartmut
    University of Mannheim, Germany.
    Eide, Elisabeth
    Oslo University College, Norway.
    Nerlich, Brigitte
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    O'Neill, Saffron
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Investigating mediated climate change communication: A best-practice guide2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents a best-practice guide for researchers interested in analyzing media communication about climate change (MCCC). It has been written by six researchers with extensive experience of studying how the climate issue is covered by media from various perspectives, be they scientific, democratic, or ideological. The suggested “best practices” concern (a) how to design MCCC research; (b) various ways to investigate MCCC in terms of modalities such as issue-attention, framing, or visualization; and (c) comparative approaches. The intention is to share knowledge about what seems to “work” or “not work” in the case of MCCC, as well as to stimulate discussion about how research on MCCC should develop in the future.

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