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  • 1.
    Brillo, J.
    et al.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Raumsimulation, Köln, Germany.
    Egry, I.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Raumsimulation, Köln, Germany.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Dep. of Mater. Science and Eng, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Density and surface tension of liquid ternary Ni-Cu-Fe alloys2006In: Zeitschrift fuer Metallkunde/Materials Research and Advanced Techniques, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density and surface tension of liquid Ni-Cu-Fe alloys have been measured over a wide temperature range, including the undercooled regime. A non-contact technique was used, consisting of an electromagnetic levitator, an optical densitometer, and an oscillating drop tensiometer. 

    At temperatures above and below the liquidus point, density and surface tension are linear functions of temperature. The concentration dependence of the density is significantly influenced by a third-order (ternary) parameter in the volume, while the surface tensions can be derived from the thermodynamic potentials (E)G of the binary phases alone.

  • 2.
    Brillo, Jürgen
    et al.
    DLR, Germany.
    Egry, Ivan
    DLR, Germany.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Density and excess volumes of liquid copper, cobalt, iron and their binary and ternary alloysRead More: http://www.hanser-elibrary.com/doi/abs/10.3139/146.1014152006In: International Journal of Materials Research - Zeitschrift für Metallkunde, ISSN 1862-5282, E-ISSN 2195-8556, Vol. 97, no 11, p. 1526-1532Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The densities of liquid copper, cobalt, and iron, their binary and ternary alloys have been measured over a temperature range including the undercooled regime. A non-contact technique was used, consisting of electromagnetic levitation combined with optical dilatometry. For all samples, the density was a linear function of temperature. The concentration dependence was studied by means of the excess volume which was negligible for Co–Fe and positive for Cu–Fe, Cu–Co, and Cu–Co–Fe. The density of the ternary alloy could be predicted from the excess volumes of the binary phases without the need to introduce any ternary interactions.

  • 3.
    Brillo, Jürgen
    et al.
    DLR, Germany.
    Egry, Ivan
    DLR, Germany.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Density and surface tension of liquid ternary Ni-Cu-Fe alloys2006In: International journal of thermophysics, ISSN 0195-928X, E-ISSN 1572-9567, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1778-1791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The density and surface tension of liquid Ni–Cu–Fe alloys have been measured over a wide temperature range, including the undercooled regime. A non-contact technique was used, consisting of an electromagnetic levitator equipped with facilities for optical densitometry and oscillating drop tensiometry. At temperatures above and below the liquidus point, the density and surface tension are linear functions of temperature. The concentration dependence of the density is significantly influenced by a third-order (ternary) parameter in the excess volume. The surface tensions are rather insensitive to substitution of the two transition metals Ni, Fe against each other and depend only on the copper concentration. By numerically solving the Butler equation, the surface tension of the ternary system can be derived from the thermodynamic potentials E G of the binary phases (Ni–Cu, Fe–Cu, Ni–Fe) alone.

  • 4.
    Egry, Ivan
    et al.
    DLR, Germany.
    Brooks, Rob
    NPL, UK.
    Holland-Moritz, Dirk
    DLR, Germany.
    Novakovic, Rada
    IENI, Italy.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Plevachuk, Yuriy
    Ricci, Enrica
    IENI, Italy.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sklyarchuk, Vasyl
    Wunderlich, Rainer
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Thermophysical properties of liquid Al-Ni alloys2010In: High Temperatures-High Pressures, ISSN 0018-1544, E-ISSN 1472-3441, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 343-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the Integrated Project IMPRESS, funded by the EU, thermophysical properties of two Al-Ni alloys have been investigated: Raney-nickel (Al-31.5 at % Ni) and Al-25 at % Ni, corresponding to the intermetallic phase Al3Ni. Transition temperatures, latent heat, heat capacity, density and electrical resistivity were measured in the solid and liquid phases. In addition, surface tension and viscosity of the melts were also determined. All quantifies have been obtained as a function of temperature, in some eases also in the undercooled liquid. In this paper, we report on results obtained for the liquid phase using advanced container-based and containerless measurement methods. The obtained data yield a comprehensive characterisation of this technologically relevant class of alloys. 

  • 5.
    Egry, Ivan
    et al.
    DLR, Germany.
    Jürgen, Brillo
    DLR, Germany.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermophysical properties of liquid Cu–Fe–Ni alloys2005In: Materials Science and Engineering A: Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructures and Processing, ISSN 0921-5093, Vol. 413-414, p. 460-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density and surface tension of liquid Cu–Fe–Ni alloys have been measured in an electromagnetic levitator over a wide temperature range, including the undercooled regime. Both properties are linear functions of temperature. Their concentration dependence, however, is highly non-linear. The fit of the density data requires an excess volume containing a substantial ternary contribution. The surface tension is correctly predicted by the Butler equation from the thermodynamic potentials of the binary phases alone. In addition, a simple model is proposed which describes the surface tension reasonably well and requires as input the surface tensions of the pure components only.

  • 6.
    Elfsberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    X-ray observation of gas evolution, flotation, and emulsification of molten carbon steel immersed in mold flux2011In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 265-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At two interfacial-tension measurement experiments with the same experimental conditions, steel samples and mold flux samples of the same compositions were melted in crucibles from the same batch. During the first experiment, the steel drop melted far below its liquidus and then was emulsified. At the second experiment, the steel melted at the expected temperature but did not emulsify. The difference that can be identified is the mass of the steel samples.

  • 7.
    Hara, Kyosuke
    et al.
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Nagata, Kazuhiro
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    In-situ X-ray Transmission Observation of Carbothermic Reduction of Magnetite Powder and Macroscopic Agglomeration of Reduced Iron2013In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1010-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The agglomeration behaviour of reduced iron, made from magnetite powder by carbothermic reduction, was observed by using the in-situ X-ray transmission observation technique. The iron particles, above 1 mm, were clearly observed as black points. Further, the reduction speed was examined by using the thermogravimetric analysis. The bulk density of the packed powder layer and the grain size distribution of magnetite powder and carbon black powder were changed and the effects of them on the reduction speed and the agglomeration degree were examined. The agglomeration degree was evaluated with diameter of iron particles on the X-ray photographs, taken during heating, and the weight of collected iron particles after the observation experiments. Neither the bulk density of powder layer nor the grain size distribution of powder mixture affected to the reduction speed. The agglomeration degree decreased when the bulk density of the powder layer was increased by compacting. On the other hand, the agglomeration degree was increased when the grain size distribution of powder mixture was widened. Further, the height change of powder layer was also measured on the X-ray photographs and compared with the iron particles appearing behaviour to estimate the microscopic agglomeration behaviour. The mechanisms that grain size distribution affected the agglomeration degree were discussed.

  • 8.
    Jarfors, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Bogdanoff, Toni
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Börrisson, Markus
    SWEREA Swecast.
    Beste, Ulrik
    VBN Components AB.
    Effect of Use in High Pressure Die Casting on Vibenite®60 Tool Inserts Madeby Additive Manufacturing2016In: DDMC2016 Frauenhofer Direct Digital Manufacturing Conference: Conference Proceedings, March 2016, Berlin, Germany / [ed] B. Müller, Fraunhofer IRB Verlag, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermo-physical and mechanical properties of Vibenite®60 was investigated in the as-manufactured, soft annealed and hardened state as well as after use in full scale high pressure die casting. Thermal conductivity in the as manufactured state was 23.3 to 27.5 W/mK in the temperature range from 25°C to 500°C. Annealing increased thermal conductivity to 25.0 up to 29.2 W/mK. Hardening reduced thermal conductivity of 19.8 to 26.1 W/mK. The tool wastested in production in the as fabricated state displayed a slight increase in thermal conductivity, which was interpreted as a slight tempering during use. Hardness measurements were made at room temperature and followed the same pattern as the thermo-physical properties. Rockwell and Vickers Hardness was lowest in the as lowest in the annealed state and hardest in the hardened state. Rockwell hardness was not affected by use in production while Vickers hardness decreased slightly.

  • 9.
    Jönsson, Pär
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aune, Ragnhild E.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Du, Sichen
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Teng, Lidong
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Sven
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    The seetharaman seminar june 14-15, 2010 in stockholm, Sweden2012In: High Temperature Materials and Processes, ISSN 0334-6455, E-ISSN 2191-0324, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 193-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kaptay, George
    et al.
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Ohuchi, Tatsuya
    Krosaki Harima, Japan.
    On different modifications of the capillary model of penetration of inert liquid metals into porous refractories and their connection to the pore size distribution of the refractories2004In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 471-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different modifications to the classical capillary model of penetration of liquid metals into porous refractories are presented; (1) with capillaries having different radii, (2) with zigzag capillaries, and (3) with capillaries, having periodically changing capillary radius along the path of penetration. All the modified capillary models were checked against our experimental results of measuring the penetration of liquid mercury into three types of alumina refractories, having different microstructure and pore size distribution. The maximum penetration height was measured by X-ray radiography, as a function of applied outside pressure. The model with periodically changing capillary has been found to describe the experimental data satisfactorily. This model divides the process of penetration into two stages. During the first period of “pre-penetration,” the maximum penetration height changes very slowly (but not linearly) as the outside pressure is increased in the interval between the “minimum threshold pressure” and the “maximum threshold pressure.” In the second, “bulk penetration” period, appearing above the maximum threshold pressure, the maximum height of penetration increases rapidly with outside pressure, according to the classical capillary model of penetration. The three structural model parameters of the model (minimum pore radius, maximum pore radius, and period of pore structure) were connected with the measured pore size distribution curves of the refractories through semiempirical equations. As a result, our complex semiempirical model is able to predict penetration diagrams for any inert liquid metal into any refractory of a similar type.

  • 11.
    Kikuchi, Naoki
    et al.
    CMU, USA.
    Nabeshima, Seiji
    JFE, Japan.
    Kishimoto, Yasuo
    JFE, Japan.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sridhar, Seetharaman
    CMU, USA.
    Effect of Ti De-oxidation on solidification and post-solidification microstructure in low carbon high manganese steel2007In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1255-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the effect of de-oxidation inclusions on micro-structure in low-carbon steels. Low carbon (0.07 wt%), high Mn (0.9 wt%) steel in a Al2O3 or MgO crucible was deoxidized by adding either aluminum (0.05 wt%) or titanium (0.05, 0.03 or 0.015 wt%) in a 400 g-scale vacuum furnace, and cast in a Cu mold at cooling rates between 2.0–6.0 K/s.The oxide inclusions were identified as Al2O3 (1–3 μm) in the Al-killed steel and Ti–Al–(Mg)–O (0.3–0.5 μm) in the Ti-killed steel. Oxide inclusion sizes in all the Ti-killed steels were smaller and inclusion densities higher than those in the Al-killed steel.Solidification structure, defined as the density of primary dendrite arms within a defined region was finer with increasing inclusion density and as a result, the solidification structure of the Ti-killed steel was finer than that of the Al-killed steel.A Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) and a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) were used to study the differences in solid state micro-structural evolution between the Ti-killed, Al-killed and the non de-oxidized samples. The growth of austenite grains were studied under isothermal conditions and it was found that both grain-boundary mobility and final grain size were lower in the Ti-killed sample than for the others. With regards to austenite decomposition, during continuous cooling from a comparable austenite grain structure, the resulting austenite decomposition structure was finer for the Ti-killed sample due to a higher Widmanstätten lath density due to precipitation at particles in addition to grain boundaries.

  • 12.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Development of long-life refractories for steelmaking2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Chapman, Lindsay
    NPL. UK.
    Rob, Brooks
    NPL, UK.
    Egry, Ivan
    DLR, Germany.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermal diffusivity of TiAlNb and AlNi alloys: the european IMPRESS project2008In: Defect and Diffusion Forum, ISSN 1012-0386, Vol. 273-276, p. 375-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal diffusivities of some industrially important alloys have been measured as a part of the EU funded Intermetallic Materials Processing in Relation to Earth and Space Solidification (IMPRESS) project which is coordinated by the European Space Agency (ESA). The thermal diffusivities of the alloys were measured by the Laser flash method with a carefully designed gas cleaning system to remove traces of oxygen from the argon atmosphere. In the present work, the thermal diffusivity of TiAlNb (Ti46.1Al45.9Nb8 at %) and AlNi alloy (Al-Ni31.5 at %) alloys have been measured independently at Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden (KTH) and National Physical Laboratory, UK (NPL). The results from both laboratories were consistent, and have been compared with predictions of phase transformation temperatures calculated using Thermo Calc and MTDATA software. Generally the variation of thermal diffusivity appears to be related to the phase transformation. However, one anomaly observed in the present work on TiAlNb was a maximum thermal diffusivity value at about 1100K. No corresponding peak was found for the density, ρ, the specific heat capacity, Cp, or the electrical resistivity, 1/σ, which were also measured as part of the project. In view of the fact that the thermal diffusivity could be related to electrical conductivity by the Wiedemann-Franz law describing electronic contribution to heat conduction, the present results indicate a non-electron contribution. This aspect is being currently investigated further. The recommended thermal diffusivity value of TiAlNb and AlNi alloys were obtained as follows. TiAlNb alloy: α = 3.75+ 5.16 ·10-3T+1.89·10-6 T2 – 2.69·10-9 T3 [10-6 m2 s-1] (293 K < T < 1573 K) AlNi alloy: α = 4.77+ 5.41·10-2T – 7.14·10-5T2 + 2.88·10-8T3 [10-6 m2 / s] (373K

  • 14.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Fecht, Hans-Jörg
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Wunderlich, Rainer K.
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Egry, Ivan
    DLR, Germany.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Studies of the thermophysical properties of commercial CMSX-4 alloy2009In: Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, ISSN 0021-9568, E-ISSN 1520-5134, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 2584-2592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, measurements of the heat capacities and thermal diffusivities of commercial CMSX-4 nickel-based superalloy are described, and the results are presented. Since the as-received commercial alloy sample is not at the thermodynamic equilibrium state, the phases present in the alloy undergo transformations toward equilibrium state as the measurements are made at temperatures above which the rate of transformation can be significant. The microstructures of the as-received sample as well as heat treated samples were observed, and the relation with the properties was discussed. The results are discussed considering the phase changes occurring with the thermodynamic equilibrium state as the reference. The results are of great relevance in the performance of these alloys in industrial applications.

  • 15.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Ghassemali, Ehsan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Saro, Albano Gómez
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Elmquist, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    On Thermal Expansion and Density of CGI and SGI Cast Irons2015In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1000-1019, article id met5021000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal expansion and density of Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI) and Spheroidal Graphite Iron (SGI) were measured in the temperature range of 25–500 °C using push-rod type dilatometer. The coefficient of the thermal expansion (CTE) of cast iron can be expressed by the following equation: CTE = 1.38 × 10−5 + 5.38 × 10−8 N − 5.85 × 10−7 G + 1.85 × 10−8 T − 2.41 × 10−6 RP/F − 1.28 × 10−8 NG − 2.97 × 10−7 GRP/F + 4.65 × 10−9 TRP/F + 1.08 × 10−7 G2 − 4.80 × 10−11 T2 (N: Nodularity, G: Area fraction of graphite (%), T: Temperature (°C), RP/F: Pearlite/Ferrite ratio in the matrix).

  • 16.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Görnerup, Mårten
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sasaki, Yasushi
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Stress relaxation behavior of molten slags2006In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1258-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hayashi, Miyuki
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermochemical and thermophysical property measurements in slag systems2005In: International journal of materials & product technology, ISSN 0268-1900, E-ISSN 1741-5209, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 351-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews developments on experimental methods and results of thermochemical and thermophysical property measurements of molten silicate slag systems and its theoretical achievements. Several selected topics are focused on, including experimental procedure and measurements of viscosity, density, surface-interfacial tension, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and velocity and absorption coefficient of ultrasonic waves. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of slags have been mainly measured by the transient techniques such as the laser flash and hot wire methods. Most of the measurements for velocity and absorption coefficient of ultrasonic waves are carried out using a pulse technique. The reliable data for thermochemical and thermophysical properties are required for the optimisation of metallurgical processes and the data is needed in order to improve the numerical models of processing. For academic interest, the results were discussed from the viewpoint of slag structure, as these properties are closely related to the slag structure.

  • 18.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ishikawa, Takehiko
    JAXA, Japan.
    Paradis, Paul-François
    JAXA, Japan.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Density measurements of mould flux slags by electrostatic levitation method2006In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 606-610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Chemical Thermodynamics in Materials Science: From Basics to Practical Applications2018Book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Zeze, Masafumi
    Nippon Steel Corporation, Japan.
    Correspondence between Surface Tension Estimated by a Surface Thermodynamic Model and Number of Bubbles in the Vicinity of the Surface of Steel Products in Continuous Casting Process2013In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface tensions of low carbon slabs and 16 mass%Cr stainless steel were estimated using a surface thermodynamic model proposed by Mukai et al. As an application of the model, an index to evaluate the driving force for the fine bubble entrapment by the solidifying shell, the Mukai-value, M, was calculated from the surface tension values. The relationship between Mukai-value and number of entrapped bubbles was discussed. A linear relationship was found between the number of captured bubbles and Mukai-value. In the previous work, the Mukai-value was used as a relative scale to evaluate the driving force for the movement of bubbles. However, by calculating the M from the surface tension values by the surface thermodynamic model, physically reasonable Mukai-values could be obtained.

  • 21.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Saro, Albano Gómez
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Elmquist, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders E. W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    On the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of CGI and SGI cast irons2017In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific heat and thermal diffusivity of Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI) and Spheroidal Graphite Iron (SGI) were measured at temperatures ranging between 373 and 773 K (100 and 500 °C) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and between 298 and 773 K (25 and 500 °C) using the laser flash method, respectively. Specific heat increased with increasing amounts of graphite and pearlite, as well as with Si content. As a recommended value of the specific heat for fully ferritic high-silicon SGI, the following relation was suggested:(Formula presented.) where T is the temperature in Celsius, (Formula presented.) is the mass% of Si, and fg is the area fraction of graphite (%). The thermal diffusivity of cast irons tends to increase with increasing amounts of graphite, and decrease with greater nodularity. It was found that nodularity had a strong influence on thermal diffusivity in the nodularity range of 15–30%. 

  • 22.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Saro, Albano Gómez
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Elmquist, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    On the thermal conductivity of CGI and SGI cast irons2018In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal conductivity of Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI) and spheroidal graphite iron (SGI) was established in the temperature range from room temperature up to 500 °C using the experimental thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The influence of nodularity, graphite amount, silicon content and temperature on the thermal conductivity of fully ferritic high-silicon cast irons was investigated. It was found that the CGI materials showed higher thermal conductivity than the SGI materials. The thermal conductivity tended to increase with increasing temperature until it reached a maximum followed by a subsequent decrease as temperature was increased up to 500 °C. Conventional models were applied to estimate thermal conductivity and the predictive accuracy of each model was evaluated. The thermal conductivity could be estimated by the Helsing model. The Maxwell model, Bruggeman model and Hashin–Shtrikman model were also in fair agreement using the thermal conductivity value of graphite parallel to the basal planes in graphite. 

  • 23.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermolab project: results on thermophysical properties data of iron alloys2008In: High Temperature Materials and Processes, ISSN 0334-6455, E-ISSN 2191-0324, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 413-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of ThermoLab project, the thermophysicalproperties of industrially important iron alloys weremeasured. In this paper, the measurement results of thedifferential scanning calorimetry (DSC), specific heatcapacity, thermal diffusivity, surface tension andviscosity of one Fe-Cr and of a low oxygen eutectoidmanganese steel are reported. In addition to the groundbased experiments, parabolic flights (microgravity)experiments with a non-contact electromagneticlevitation device were employed for surface tension andviscosity measurements.

  • 24.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Watanabe, Takashi
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Dynamic in situ x‐ray observation of a molten steel drop shape change in molten slag2011In: Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Section C - Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, ISSN 0371-9553, E-ISSN 1743-2855, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, the interfacial reactions between molten synthetic slag (Al2O3–CaO–SiO2–FeO) and liquid iron alloy were investigated at 1873 K with the aid of an X‐ray radiographic apparatus. The mother slag consists of 40 mass%CaO, 40 mass%SiO2 and 20 mass%Al2O3. FeO was added to this slag at the experimental temperature, and the movement of the droplet and deformation of the droplet shape were monitored in the dynamic mode. The change of the shape of the droplet is discussed based on the reaction and mass transfer at the slag/metal interface. From the movement of the droplet, interfacial velocity of the metal droplet induced by Marangoni flow was estimated and compared with the results obtained in the present laboratory earlier. The importance of surface velocity values on steel refining process simulations is discussed.

  • 25.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Watanabe, Takashi
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Hayashi, Miyuki
    Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Thermal, optical and surface/interfacial properties of molten slag systems2011In: International Materials Reviews, ISSN 0950-6608, E-ISSN 1743-2804, Vol. 56, no 5-6, p. 287-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In modelling mass and heat transfer steps in metallurgical processes, it is important to have knowledge of the physical properties of slags, the most important among these being the surface and interfacial tensions, thermal diffusivities, optical properties and viscosities. A critical review is presented of work reported in the past two decades relating to the following properties of slag systems: (i) surface/interfacial tensions and related interfacial phenomena; (ii) thermal diffusivities and thermal conductivities; (iii) velocities and coefficients of absorption of ultrasonic waves; (iv) optical properties. A perspective for further work is also provided.

  • 26.
    Mostaghel, Sina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Samuelsson, Caisa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björkman, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Influence of alumina on physical properties of an industrial zinc-copper smelting slag Part 1 – viscosity2013In: Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Section C - Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, ISSN 0371-9553, E-ISSN 1743-2855, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rotating cylinder method was applied to measure the viscosities of an industrial iron silicate slag and mixtures of this slag with 5, 10 and 15 wt-% alumina addition, in temperature range 1100–1300°C. The measured viscosities were compared with the predicted values using two of the commercially available software products for viscosity calculations, namely Thermoslag®1.5 and FactSageTM6.2. As the models can only predict viscosities for a solid free melt, obtained values by FactSageTM6.2 were modified using the Einstein–Roscoe equation. Results show that aluminium behaves as a network former cation in this type of slag, and by increasing the alumina concentration, the melt becomes progressively polymerised. Consequently, the viscosity of the slag increases at a given temperature, which is supported by thermodynamic predictions. According to the modified FactSageTM6.2 calculations, the viscosity of the solid containing slag increases from 2.1 to 5.5 poise at the industrial operating temperature (∼1250°C).

  • 27.
    Mostaghel, Sina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Samuelsson, Caisa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björkman, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Influence of alumina on physical properties of an industrial zinc–copper smelting slag Part 2 – apparent density, surface tension and effective thermal diffusivity2013In: Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Section C - Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, ISSN 0371-9553, E-ISSN 1743-2855, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apparent density, surface tension and effective thermal diffusivity of an industrial iron‐silicate based slag and mixtures of this slag with 5, 10 and 15 wt-% alumina addition were measured using the sessile drop and the laser flash techniques respectively. A comparison is made between corresponding values obtained from the commonly applied models and the experimental measurements. Results show that increasing the alumina concentration in slag increases the degree of polymerisation of the melt and, consequently, its effective thermal diffusivity. By alumina addition to the system, the surface tension increases progressively from 338 mN m−1, in the reference slag sample, to 488 mN m−1 in the mixture of slag and 15 wt-% alumina addition. The apparent density of the liquid‐solid containing slag is continuously decreased due to the increased alumina concentration. However, the effect is more pronounced between 8 and 12 wt-% total alumina content in the slag.

  • 28.
    Mostaghel, Sina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Samuelsson, Caisa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björkman, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Influence of alumina on physical properties of an industrial zinc–copper smelting slag Part 3 – melting behaviour2013In: Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Section C - Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, ISSN 0371-9553, E-ISSN 1743-2855, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combination of different experimental techniques and thermodynamic calculations has been used to investigate the melting behaviour of an industrial iron silicate slag and mixtures of this slag with 5, 10 and 15 wt-% alumina addition. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermooptical observation were applied to monitor the solidus temperature and softening behaviour of the samples respectively. Estimation of the liquidus temperature was made using the second derivative of activation energies for viscous flow, with respect to temperature. All experimentally detected values were compared to predictions made using the FactSageTM6.2 thermodynamic package. Results show that as the slag lies in the fayalite primary phase field, the liquidus temperature decreases due to the increased alumina concentration. In the hercynite primary crystallisation phase field, however, alumina addition to the system increases the liquidus temperature. The solidus temperature does not vary significantly due to the current changes in the total alumina content of the slag.

  • 29.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    et al.
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Li, Linfeng
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Behavior of gas curtain formed at the boundary between container wall and liquid by injection gas2004In: Tetsu to hagane, ISSN 0021-1575, E-ISSN 1883-2954, Vol. 90, no 6, p. 439-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Mukai, Kusuhiro
    et al.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Interfacial Physical Chemistry of High-Temperature Melts2019Book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    et al.
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mills, Kenneth C.
    Imperial College, UK.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Furuzono, Takahiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Surface tension of liquid alloys: a thermodynamic approach2008In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 561-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A formula is derived to describe the surface tensions of binary and dilute multicomponent alloys such as iron alloys. It was thermodynamically proved that the surface tension can be described by a function of the concentrations of the alloy components in bulk phase through the use of thermodynamic parameters. The formula was applied to the binary alloys, Fe-O-N and Fe-O-S systems. The described surface tensions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  • 32.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    et al.
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Motion of fine particles in liquid caused by interfacial tension gradient in relation to metals separation technologies2005In: Scandinavian journal of metallurgy, ISSN 0371-0459, E-ISSN 1600-0692, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 137-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some ideas for promoting the metal separation process are proposed based on the consideration of the force caused by interfacial tension gradient as a driving force. The force drives the particle toward the direction of the lower interfacial tension side, which has been confirmed by water model experiments. Therefore, it is possible to move fine metal particles by producing interfacial tension gradient between fine metal particles and molten slag. The force in molten slag–metal (iron) system was evaluated under some assumptions. The evaluation indicates that the force is enough large to engulf the fine metal particle by the interface between metal particle and slag for promoting metal separation process.

  • 33.
    Ricci, E.
    et al.
    IENI, Italy.
    Giuranno, D.
    IENI, Italy.
    Novakovic, R.
    IENI, Italy.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Brooks, R.
    NPL, UK.
    Chapman, L. A.
    NPL, UK.
    Quested, P. N.
    NPL, UK.
    Density, surface tension, and viscosity of CMSX-4® superalloy2007In: International journal of thermophysics, ISSN 0195-928X, E-ISSN 1572-9567, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1304-1321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface tension, density, and viscosity of the Ni-based superalloy CMSX-4® have been determined in the temperature ranges of 1,650–1,850 K, 1,650–1,950 K, and 1,623–1,800 K, respectively. Each property has been measured in parallel by different techniques at different participating laboratories, and the results are compared with the aim to improve the reliability of data and to identify recommended values. The following relationships have been proposed: density-ρ (T) [kg· m−3] = 7,876 − 1.23(T − 1,654 K); surface tension-γ (T) [mN·m−1] = 1,773 − 0.56 (T − 1, 654 K); viscosity-η (T) [mPa·s] = 8.36 − 1.82 × 10−2(T − 1,654 K). For a comparison, surface-tension measurements on the Al-88.6 at% Ni liquid alloy with the same Al-content as the CMSX-4® alloy were also performed. In addition, the surface tension and density have been theoretically evaluated by different models, and subsequently compared with new experimental data as well as with those reported in the literature. The surface-tension experimental data for the liquid CMSX-4® alloy were found to be close to that of the Al-88.6 at% Ni alloy which is consistent with results from the compound formation model (CFM).

  • 34.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Hakamada, Shinya
    Gakushuin Univ, Dept Phys, Tokyo, Japan.
    Onodera, Kenta
    Gakushuin Univ, Dept Phys, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kargl, Florian
    German Aerosp Ctr DLR, Inst Mat Phys Space, Cologne, Germany.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Watanabe, Masahito
    Gakushuin Univ, Dept Phys, Tokyo, Japan.
    Measurement of Viscosity of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 Slag in Wide Temperature Range by Aerodynamic Levitation and Rotating Bob Methods and Sources of Systematic Error2018In: International journal of microgravity science and application, ISSN 0915-3616, Vol. 35, no 2, article id 350204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viscosity measurements for SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 based ternary slags with low SiO2 content were performed for a wide temperature range utilizing the aerodynamic levitation and rotating bob methods. Aerodynamic levitation was used for temperatures >= 2229 K and the viscosity was calculated by the sample oscillation decay time. The rotating bob method was used for temperatures <= 1898 K and the viscosity was determined by the variation of the torque at different rotation speeds. Fitting curves were created using Mauro’s viscosity equation. The main sources of systematic error were identified to be the sample weight measurement, the resolution of the high-speed camera, the fitting of the linear trend line in the torque against rpm diagrams and the vertical position of the bob. The combined standard uncertainty from all error sources was calculated for both measurement methods.

  • 35.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Hakamada, Shinya
    Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Watanabe, Masahito
    Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Viscosity of SiO2–CaO–Al2O3 slag with low silica – Influence of CaO/Al2O3, SiO2/Al2O3 ratio2018In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 2180-2185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The viscosity of low SiO2 (10–20 mass%)-CaO-Al2O3 slag system was measured in a wide temperature range (1 623–2 800 K) using the rotational bob method and the aerodynamic levitation method. The influence of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio and CaO/Al2O3 ratio on the viscosity was examined. It was concluded that the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio did not affect the degree of polymerization of the aluminosilicate network in the composition range of the present study. An abnormal behaviour of the viscosity was observed at a CaO/Al2O3 ratio of 1.57 which was attributed to the formation of 12CaO·7Al2O3-like clusters. It was concluded that the overall influence on the viscosity could be expressed as the summation of the influence from the aluminosilicate network and the influence from the cluster formation of the primary precipitating solid phase. The temperature dependence of the cluster formation was coupled to the driving force of precipitation of the 12CaO·7Al2O3 phase.

  • 36.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    Lauenstein, Åsa
    Swerea SWECAST AB.
    Ekerot, Sven
    Comdicast AB.
    Particles precipitation in Ti and Al deoxidized Hadfield steels2016In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 87, no 10, p. 1344-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characteristics and precipitation mechanism of particles in titanium and aluminum treated Hadfield steel casted during pilot scale experiments have been studied. Light Optical Microscopy (LOM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were utilized for the particle analysis and characterization. Additionally, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed using Thermo-Calc software. Aluminum oxides, titanium carbon nitrides, titanium carbides and manganese sulfides were the main types of particles found. The order of precipitation during solidification and chemical composition range of each type of particle was determined. Aluminum Oxides were found to act as nucleation sites fortitanium carbon nitrides. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculation for particles characteristics were in good agreement with the experimental findings. Titanium carbides were found to form during initial stages of the Ferro-titanium additions dissolution.

  • 37.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Lauenstein, Åsa
    Swerea SWECAST AB, Sweden.
    Ekerot, Sven
    Comdicast AB, Sweden.
    Jarfors, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    A particle population analysis in Ti- and Al-deoxidized Hadfield steels2018In: International Journal of Cast Metals Research, ISSN 1364-0461, E-ISSN 1743-1336, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative analysis of the amount, size and number of particles that precipitate in situ in titanium- and aluminium-treated Hadfield steel cast during pilot-scale experiments has been performed. SEM with EDS and automated particle analysis abilities was utilized for the analysis. Additionally, Thermo-Calc was used for thermodynamic calculations and Magma 5 for solidification and cooling simulations. Predicted particles sizes calculated with a model based on the Ostwald ripening mechanism were compared with the experimental data. The effect of solute availability, cooling rate and deoxidation practice on the particle population characteristics was determined. It was concluded that the amount, size and number of precipitating particles in Hadfield steel castings is possible to be controlled according to certain requirements by a careful selection of proper additives in proper amounts and also by the optimization of the casting process in aspects of deoxidation timing and control of the cooling rate of the castings.

  • 38.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Lauenstein, Åsa
    Swerea SWECAST AB, Sweden.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Ekengård, Johan
    Sandvik SRP, Sweden.
    The Influence of Deoxidation Practice on the As-Cast Grain Size of Austenitic Manganese Steels2017In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 7, no 6, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of in-situ precipitating particles on the grain size of Al-Ti-treated and untreated Hadfield steel cast in a pilot scale environment was studied. Hadfield steel was melted in an induction furnace and cast in Y-Block samples. Light Optical Microscopy (LOM) and the intercept method were utilized for the grain size measurements. Additionally, Thermo-Calc Software TCFE7 Steels/Fe-alloys database version 7 was used for thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of the mole fraction of particles. The planar disregistry values between the austenite and the precipitating particles were calculated. It was observed that increasing oxide content in samples with low Ti(CN) content resulted in a finer microstructure, while increasing the Ti(CN) content under similar oxide content levels led to a coarser microstructure. The potency of each type of particle to nucleate austenitic grains was determined. Spinel (MnAl2O4, MgAl2O4) particles were characterized as the most potent, followed by olivine (Mn2SiO4), corundum (Al2O3, TiO2), and finally Ti(CN), the least potent particle.

  • 39.
    Verezub, Olga
    et al.
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Kaptay, George
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mukai, Kusuhiro
    Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan.
    Penetration dynamics of solid particles into liquids high-speed experimental results and modelling2005In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 473-474, p. 429-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penetration of model solid particles (polymer, teflon, nylon, alumina) into transparent model liquids (distilled water and aqueous solutions of KI) were recorded by a high speed (500 frames per second) camera, while the particles were dropped from different heights vertically on the still surface of the liquids. In all cases a cavity has been found to form behind the solid particle, penetrating into the liquid. For each particle/liquid combination the critical dropping height has been measured, above which the particle was able to penetrate into the bulk liquid. Based on this, the critical impact particle velocity, and also the critical Weber number of penetration have been established. The critical Weber number of penetration was modelled as a function of the contact angle, particle size and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the density of the liquid.

  • 40.
    Wunderlich, R. K.
    et al.
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Fecht, Hans-Jörg
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Egry, Ivan
    DLR, Germany.
    Etay, J.
    Battezzati, L.
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Ricci, E.
    IENI, Italy.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermophysical properties of a Fe-Cr-Mo Alloy in the solid and liquid phase2012In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of a thermophysical characterization of a Fe-Cr-Mo alloy in the solid and liquid phases are reported. Methods applied include calorimetry, dilatometry; the laser flash technique for thermal diffusivity measurement and ultrasound pulse echo for the measurement of the room temperature sound velocities and elastic constants. Density in the liquid phase and surface tension were measured by optical dilatometry and by the oscillating drop method on electromagnetic levitated specimen. In addition, surface tension and viscosity were measured by the oscillating drop method on board parabolic flights under reduced gravity conditions. The methods applied and results obtained are presented. This work represents a collaborative effort, including round robin measurements in different laboratories for a characterization of the basic thermophysical properties needed for process simulation.

  • 41.
    Zhang, Zuotai
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Li, Wenchao
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Investigation of wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MgAlON-based ceramics by x-ray sessile drop technique2006In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 421-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MoAlON-based composite ceramics were investigated using X-ray sessile drop technique. The contact angles were measured on substrates of different composites as functions of temperature and varying partial pressures of oxygen. The results with pure argon gas showed that contact angles kept almost constant in the temperature range 1823 to 1873 K. The contact angle was found to show a slight increase with increasing boron nitride (BN) content in MgAlON-BN composites. These are attributed to the higher contact angle between BN substrate and liquid iron drop compared with that obtained for MgAlON substrate. When the CO-CO2-Ar gas mixtures were introduced into the system, the contact angle showed an initial quick decrease followed by a slow decrease and then a period of nearly constant contact angle at a given temperature corresponding to the steady-state condition. Even in this case, BN seemed to cause an increase in the equilibrium contact angle. The equilibrium contact angle was found to decrease with increasing temperature. XRD results indicated that the substrate was oxidized and the oxidation products combined with FeO formed by the oxidation of the iron drop to form FeAl2O4 and Mg1-xFexO. These were likely to form a ternary FeO-Al2O3-MgO slag or a quaternary slag by combining with B2O3. An interesting observation is that the iron drop moved away from the original site, probably due to the Marangoni effect.

  • 42.
    Zhang, Zuotai
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Li, Wenchao
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Reactions between MgAlON-BN Composites and CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-“FeO” Slag2007In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reactions between MgAlON and MgAlON-BN composites and synthetic CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-“FeO” slag at different temperatures were investigated under stagnant condition using the ‘‘finger’’ experiment as well as X-ray sessile drop methods. The corrosion rate was denoted by the radius difference between the initial radius of the specimen rod and the unreacted core at definite time intervals. The experimental results showed that the radius difference is linear with the square root of time. This indicated that the diffusion of ions in the slag through the product layer is the rate-determining step. One product layer was observed between the unreacted core and slag. X-ray images showed that gas bubbles were generated during the slag penetration. The slag penetration process depends strongly on the temperature. The apparent activation energy was evaluated to be 376.4 kJ/mol. The FeO addition into slag increased the slag corrosion rate. This is most probably due to the decrease of the slag viscosity, because the Fe+2 generally behaves as a network breaker. Furthermore, MgAlON and boron nitride (BN) can be oxidized by FeO, which also increased the slag corrosion rate. The slag corrosion rate decreased with increasing BN content. This can be explained by the fact that the grain boundary interfacial energy decreases with the increase of BN content and nonwetting of BN by molten slag compared to pure MgAlON.

1 - 42 of 42
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