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  • 1.
    Chesbrough, Henry
    et al.
    ESADE Business School.
    Vanhaverbeke, Wim
    ESADE Business School.
    Bakici, Tuba
    ESADE Business School.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    ESADE Business School.
    Open Innovation and Public Policy in Europe2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial innovation processes are becoming more open. The large, vertically integrated R&D laboratory systems of the 20th century are giving way to more vertically disintegrated networks of innovation that connect numerous companies into ecosystems. Since innovation policy ultimately rests on the activities and initiatives of the private sector, it is vital that policy follows this evolution.

    Previous innovation policies relied on large companies to act as the engines of innovation in the EU. While large companies remain quite relevant to innovation within the EU, they themselves report that their processes involve many more SMEs and other contributors outside their own walls. Therefore, innovation policy must also move outside the walls of these large companies and consider the roles of human capital, competition policy, financing, intellectual property, and public data in promoting an environment of open innovation.

    In this report, we combine new research and analysis on open innovation with focused interviews of major participants in the European innovation system. The result is a series of recommendations for public policies that could, if implemented, improve the climate for open innovation to take place in the European Union – and thereby improve the competitiveness of the European economy overall. Taken together, these recommendations comprise an informal ‘charter’ for EU open innovation policy. The authors would like to thank Esther Van Zimmeren of the Centre for Intellectual Property Rights (CIR) of the Catholic University of Leuven for her explanation of various aspects of the European patenting system and the role of patent pools and IP clearing houses.

    This report was commissioned by ESADE Business School in Barcelona and the Science|Business Innovation Board AISBL. The Board is a Belgian not-for-profit scientific association that commissions original policy research, engages with policymakers and the press, and works generally to improve the climate for innovation in Europe. Its three co-founders are Science|Business, ESADE and INSEAD, with participation and support from Microsoft, BP, SKF and Imperial College London. In addition, Pfizer contributed support for this particular study. Further information is at www.sciencebusiness.net. The Board is grateful to Máire GeogheganQuinn, EU Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, for her encouragement and comments on this research.

  • 2. Dabrowska, Ustyna
    et al.
    Podmetina, Daria
    Albats, Ekaterina
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Teplov, Roman
    Where lies the difference between open innovation adopters and non-adopters?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Du, Jingshu
    et al.
    Vlerick Business School.
    Leten, Bart
    Vlerick Business School.
    Vanhaverbeke, Wim
    Hasselt University, ESADE Business School, National University of Singapore.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Linköpings universitet.
    When Research Meets Development: Antecedents and Implications of Transfer Speed2014In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1181-1198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the organization of new product development in large, R&D-intensive firms. In these firms, research and development activities are often separated. Research is conducted in dedicated research projects at specialized research labs. Once research results are achieved by research projects, they are transferred to business units for further development and commercialization. We investigate the speed whereby research projects transfer their first research results to business units (hereafter: transfer speed). In particular, we analyze the antecedents and performance implications of transfer speed. Based on data of 503 research projects from a European R&D intensive manufacturing firm, our results suggest that a fast transfer speed (as measured by the time it takes for a research project to develop and transfer its first research result to business units) is associated with a better research performance (as measured by the total number of transfers the research project generates). Moreover, we find that different types of external R&D partners—science-based and market-based partners—play distinct roles in speeding up project first research transfers. While market-based partnerships (i.e., customers and suppliers) generally contribute to a faster transfer of first research results, science-based partnerships (i.e., universities and research institutions) only speed up first research transfers of technologically very complex projects. Our results also show that early patent filings by research projects accelerate first research transfers.

  • 4.
    Dąbrowska, Justyna
    et al.
    School of Management, College of Business, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ritala, Paavo
    School of Business and Management, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Waking the sleeping beauty: Swarovski’s open innovation journey2019In: R &D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even in today’s turbulent business environment, there are companies in many industries that have enjoyed decades of relatively undisturbed success. However, eventually, after such prolonged periods of calm, existing market positions are challenged. We describe such companies as ‘Sleeping Beauties’ and discuss how they can reinvent themselves through opening up of their boundaries and moving from compartmentalized exploitation and exploration efforts to a more dynamic ambidexterity model. We analyse Swarovski’s open innovation journey in this regard, instigated as a response to recent changes in its business environment. Our analysis of this process offers useful insights for companies struggling with similar problems. 

  • 5.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Open innovation in emerging markets: a longitudinal study of the antecedents, micro-foundations, and outcomes of dynamic capabilities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Linköpings universitet.
    Celadon, Kleber Luís
    Universitetet i Sao Paulo.
    Sbragia, Roberto
    Universitetet i Sao Paulo.
    Öppen innovation på tillväxtmarknader2016In: Öppen innovation: i teori och praktik / [ed] Nicolette Lakemond & Fredrik Tell, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 55-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Dabrowska, Justyna
    Ritala, Paavo
    How to Implement Open Innovation in Practice?: A Case Study of a Cultural Transition2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional firms that used to rely on high quality, internal R&D, and slow development cycles are facing major demands in the increasingly dynamic and open markets. They are facing both strategic transformation from closed to open innovation, which brings along cultural and behavioral challenges. This study examines an in-depth case study of European B2C firm, which unravels the open innovation transition journey focusing on two key dimensions - ecosystem strategy and ambidextrous organizing. We find that the case company has undergone the transition in three particular phases, with implications to the organizational boundaries (ecosystem strategy) as well as how they deal with contradictory exploitation and exploration tensions (ambidextrous organizing).

  • 8.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Open innovation in emerging markets: The connection of strategy and capabilities2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    The Cogs And Wheels Of Open Innovation: The Role Of Mechanisms In the Capability Lifecycle2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in emerging markets was once a long catch-up process requiring investment in internal R&D. Now, this process involves aligning external and internal actors with the company’s innovation strategy and capabilities. This study illustrates how a Brazilian multinational – Natura Cosmetics – progressed from the traditional strategy formulation and closed innovation processes to an open strategy and open innovation processes by increasing the involvement of external actors.

  • 10.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University.
    Why don’t endowments of unique natural resources lead to innovation? Aligning strategy, processes, and resources to build innovation capabilitie2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a single longitudinal case study of the largest Brazilian cosmetic company, Natura Cosmetics, from 2001 to 2018, we show how Natura integrated open strategy and open innovation as an intertwined and evolutionary process, making changes to this process in several phases. The findings highlight how participative forms of strategy formulation (i.e., open strategy) and collaborative innovation (i.e., open innovation) help to build innovation capabilities for EMNEs. The findings also point to the dynamic and temporal character of capability building and suggest that EMNEs implement open strategy and open innovation in emerging markets in several phases through the continuous interaction and re-adjustment of innovation plans, innovation goals, and open innovation processes. The article presents how Natura initially implemented open innovation to address specific technology problems (initiation and formation phases) to generate opportunities for the Brazilian ecosystem (establishment and consolidation phases).

  • 11.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Why don't endowments of unique natural ressoruces lead to innovation? Aligning strategy, processes and resources to build innovation capabilities2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although natural resources, such as forests, ores, and agriculture crops, are essential for emerging market firms to build innovation capabilities that contribute to their global competitive advantage, existing innovation research has mainly built on studies of emerging market firms in manufacturing-intensive industries. As the conditions in these two contexts are very different, this article explores how emerging market multinationals (EMNEs) operating in natural resource–intensive industries build their innovation capabilities. Based on a single longitudinal case study of the largest Brazilian cosmetic company, Natura Cosmetics, from 2001 to 2018, we show how Natura integrated open strategy and open innovation as an intertwined and evolutionary process, making changes to this process in several phases. The findings highlight how participative forms of strategy formulation (i.e., open strategy) and collaborative innovation (i.e., open innovation) help to build unique innovation capabilities for EMNEs. The findings also point to the dynamic and temporal character of capability building and suggest that EMNEs implement open strategy and open innovation in emerging markets in several phases through the continuous interaction and re-adjustment of innovation plans, innovation goals, and open innovation processes. The article presents how Natura initially implemented open innovation to address specific technology problems (initiation and formation phases) to generate opportunities for the Brazilian national ecosystem (establishment and consolidation phases).

  • 12.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University.
    Garnica, Leonardo Augusto
    Natura Cosméticos S.A..
    Hashiba, Luciana
    Fundação Getulio Vargas.
    Open Innovation in Emerging Markets and New Capabilities Generation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in emerging markets used to be a long catch-up process that requires investments in internal R&D. Now, this process involves aligning external and internal actors with company's innovation strategy and capabilities. This study illustrates how a Brazilian multinational - Natura Cosmetics - progresses from traditional strategy formulation to open strategy and open innovation processes when increasing the involvement of external actors. In different phases of open innovation and strategy the company acquired new capabilities to implement several models of collaboration besides the innovation ecosystem engagement as the partnerships became more important to the company and its innovation strategy. The results also showed that companies in emerging markets have different open innovation challenges than companies in emerged markets and these particularities in many cases are related to need and opportunity of new innovation capabilities.

  • 13.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Winemakers as storytellers: The role of storying in the transformation of a regional identity2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral - ESPAE Graduate School of Management, Equador.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Izquierdo, Edgar
    Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral - ESPAE Graduate School of Management, Equador.
    Caicedo, Guido
    Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral - ESPAE Graduate School of Management, Equador.
    Lasio, Virginia
    Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral - ESPAE Graduate School of Management, Equador.
    Value creation in mid-range emerging economies: Exploring SMEs strategies2014In: Conference Proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging markets represent the new source of economic development. Yet, most innovation management research has centered only on newly developed economies such as Brazil, Chile. This manuscript focuses on exploring innovation activities on mid-range emerging markets i.e. Ecuador, Colombia. These types of markets are particularly relevant as have quickly moved from traditional emerging economies but are not considered yet newly developed economies. This paper focuses on the value creation activities at SMEs in the Ecuadorian market. Ecuador is categorized as a mid-range emerging economy as it has a high institutional development but a low infrastructure and market development. The findings of our paper reveal SMEs in mid-range emerging economies design strategies to create value for customers from emerged markets, use alliances to access the necessary material e.g. natural resources, products. Our study contributed to the growing literature on emerging markets and disentangles various strategies use by SMEs to succeed in developed economies.

  • 15.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    How do digital capabilities change institutionalised professionalpractices? A response from Swedish media companies2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For over two centuries, technology has reshaped professional work. In most cases, these changes were positive as they have created new areas of work for professions and destroyed relatively few. Recently, however, technological change i.e. digitalization has also negatively impacted professionals with numerous professions, such as journalist, doctors, accountants. While research has extensively focused on digital technologies, per se, research has ignored its effect on the agents implementing technologies i.e. professionals. We suggest that organizing digitalization involves not only recombining physical and digital technologies but also reconstructing institutional professions. We use a comparative case study of two of the oldest Swedish newspaper companies to present: 1) two paths to build digital capabilities i.e. building digital capabilities or acquiring digital capabilities and 2) detail a change in the professional practices. Our results portray how digitalization changed professionals from doing occupational tasks to build collaborative relations with other professions.

  • 16.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    ESADE Business School.
    Ramis-Puyol, Juan
    ESADE Business School.
    Connecting the Mediterranean system of innovation: A functional perspective2011In: EuroMed Journal of Business, ISSN 1450-2194, E-ISSN 1758-888X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 46-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a first exploratory overview of the Mediterranean system of innovation and present the results of interactive work with 25 innovation delegates from northern and southern Mediterranean countries. The study comes at a watershed for the Union for the Mediterranean, which is drawing up innovation policies for the future and debating ways of boosting core activities.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research benefits from the established literature on innovation systems (IS) to study how Mediterranean countries are enhancing their innovation capabilities. In collaboration with the European Institute of the Mediterranean, this research invited delegates from northern and southern Mediterranean countries, programme directors and representatives from the European Commission to discuss national and regional innovation activities in their own countries.

    Findings

    The data shed light on how activities conducted by public and private organisations influence the IS functions, revealing shifting services and business models. Finally, the data highlighted the need to draw up an innovation strategy to boost R&D capabilities.

    Originality/value

    The value of this research lies in the application of the well-established IS approach to the Mediterranean case and a description of existing enabling and blocking mechanisms.

  • 17.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Subsidiary Strategies of MNCs in emerging economies: The case of Brazil2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of multinational corporations have established foreign R&D units in developed economies to internationalize their R&D activities. Recently, however, MNCs have decided to establish R&D subsidiaries in the socalled BRICS countries but their use and benefits has not been fully explored,particularly for R&D units located in Brazil. Since limited research investigated the subsidiary roles, innovation activities and contribution to MNCs, this phenomenon needs to be studied from a value chain perspective. Thus, the specific purpose of this manuscript is to explore patterns in how Swedish MNCs use subsidiaries in Brazil to initiate and establish their R&D activities. This manuscript addresses these issues by exploring how a group of Swedish MNCs:

    a) initiated R&D activities in Brazil; b) developed both internal R&D as well as open innovation practices and c) transferred back new technologies to corporate headquarters in Sweden. Our findings reveal MNCs employ different subsidiary roles from minimal R&D activities to globally integrated R&D units. Within this spectrum subsidiaries employ different R&D strategies to connect with local scientific– and market partners and contribute back differently to MNCs’ global R&D activities.

  • 18.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala University.
    Gillmore, Edward
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Dancing with an economic turmoil in emerging markets: A Longitudinal Study of Subsidiary Role Change in Swedish R&D Subsidiaries2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Sbragia, Roberto
    University of Sao Paulo.
    The role of Brazilian subsidiary R&D in Swedish MNEs: – towards tropicalized innovations?2014In: Management of innovation and technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 3, p. 6-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging economies has received much interest lately, and perhaps most the so-called BRICS (Brazil, Russia; India, China, South Africa) markets due to their sheer size and economic growth. However, the importance of these markets have been further highlighted in technology-related phenomena such as frugal innovations at the bottom of the pyramid and reverse innovation patterns where products and services invented in emerging markets are diffusing around the globe.

  • 20.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Linköpings universitet.
    Vanhaverbeke, Wim
    Hasselt University, ESADE Business School, National University of Singapore.
    Where and how to search?: Search paths in open innovation2016In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Search for external knowledge is vital for firms’ innovative activities. To understand search, we propose two knowledge search dimensions: search space (local or distant) and search heuristics (experiential or cognitive). Combining these two dimensions, we distinguish four search paths – situated paths, analogical paths, sophisticated paths, and scientific paths – which respond to recent calls to move beyond “where to search” and to investigate the connection with “how to search.” Also, we highlight how the mechanisms of problem framing and boundary spanning operate within each search path to identify solutions to technology problems. We report on a study of 18 open innovation projects that used an innovation intermediary, and outline the characteristics of each search path. Exploration of these search paths enriches previous studies of search in open innovation by providing a comprehensive, but structured, framework that explains search, its underlying mechanisms, and potential outcomes.

  • 21.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Entrepreneurial storying: Winepreneurs as crafters of regional identity stories2018In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, ISSN 1465-7503, E-ISSN 2043-6882, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 282-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context and entrepreneurship are intertwined. In some contexts, the ability to craft a compelling regional identity story may become crucial for enacting entrepreneurial action. Building on an in-depth case study of the recent revival of a Spanish wine region, we analyze the interaction between regional context (i.e. regional identity) and entrepreneurial behavior. We find that to facilitate the creation of conducive conditions for entrepreneurial action, entrepreneurs craft regional identity stories. We show that stories both reflect and possess agency and propose that storying is a process of constructing new identity stories. Specifically, we identify three different types of narratives and observe that the local winepreneurs actively engage in storying—that is, contextualizing the story to their needs.

  • 22.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    López-Vega, Henry
    Wine makers as cultural entrepreneurs: The tensions in crafting collective identity stories2013In: Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Melander, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Linköpings universitet.
    Impact of technological uncertainty in supplier selection for NPD collaborations: Literature review and a case study2013In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 323-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper combines a literature review and a case study of supplier selection for new product development (NPD) collaboration to illustrate the impact of technological uncertainty and how firms cope with it. In the review, 21 relevant papers were found after an extensive search. The case study is based on an NPD project to select suppliers for a cable for high voltage transmissions, transporting energy from wind farms at sea to stations located on land. The literature review reveals that supplier selection for NPD under technological uncertainty is indeed problematic. It is not clear from the literature review how firms should select suppliers. Some studies point towards the importance of prior collaborations while others suggest that firms should search for new suppliers and broaden their network. There are a number of aspects that our literature review does not tell us, and consequently we provide suggestions for future research.

  • 24.
    Ots, Mart
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Stretching the knowledge boundaries of the firm: How local newspapers reinvent organizational practices in a digital world2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Podmetina, Daria
    et al.
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Soderquist, Klas Eric
    Athens University of Economics & Business, Greece.
    Dąbrowska, Justyna
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Hafkesbrink, Joachim
    Hochschule für Organisation and Management, Germany.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Industrial needs for open innovation education2016In: Innovation education reloaded: Nurturing skills for the future : The open innovation handbook / [ed] Anne-Laure Mention, Arie P. Nagel, Joachim Hafkesbrink, Justyna Dąbrowska, Lappeenranta University of Technology , 2016, p. 42-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in the OI-Net project was to collect information on the industrial needs for open innovation education. For this purpose, the first European Survey on Identification of Industrial Needs for Open Innovation Education was developed and launched. The OI-Net project partners collected over 500 responses from European companies (large, SMEs, and micro firms). This study responds to the challenge of creating a European-wide open innovation policy (Chesbrough, Vanhaverbeke, Lopez-Vega & Bakici, 2011) that attracts qualified and experienced researchers to boost R&D, entrepreneurship and links between industry and society in Europe. This chapter provides a summary of the key findings derived from the survey, including such indicators as the variety and intensity of open innovation practices adopted by companies, their experience and future ambitions in open innovation adoption, and the key organizational competences defining the open innovation capability of a firm. In addition to analyzing organizational capabilities and open innovation adoption practices on the company level, employees’ individual skills associated with open innovation implementation were studied. This resulted in one of the core findings of the project - the Open Innovation Specialist Competences Profile consisting of the most important skills and abilities that specialists in open innovation should possess. These findings bring new knowledge to companies’ HR and innovation management; to their hiring policy, to employees’ training and education practices, and at the same time, provide Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) with a competence framework, based on which open innovation education can be planned. Thus, the impact of this chapter includes: 1) enhancing academic research, 2) providing new instruments for academic teaching, and 3) guiding companies in the relevant skills for open and collaborative innovation.

  • 26.
    Silveira, Franciane Freitas
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do ABC, Brazil.
    Sbragia, Roberto
    Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Determinants of reverse knowledge transfer for emerging market multinationals: The role of complexity, autonomy and embeddedness2017In: Revista de Administração, ISSN 0080-2107, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 176-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subsidiaries conduct innovation activities in foreign markets either to capture valuable knowledge that is necessary to adapt their products to local markets or to create valuable knowledge for headquarters. For emerging market multinationals, most studies have overlooked the determinants of successful reverse knowledge transfer from subsidiaries located in emerging and developed markets. This paper analyzed the responses of a survey administered to 78 Brazilian multinationals that own subsidiaries in developed and emerging markets. We found that knowledge complexity developed at the subsidiary, its autonomy and embeddedness in the foreign market determine the successful reverse knowledge transfer to headquarters of emerging market multinationals. This paper contributes to previous studies of reverse knowledge transfer by underlying the main drivers for emerging market multinationals.

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