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  • 1.
    Cyron, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The construction of social performance feedback in digital channels2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Fritsch, Michael
    et al.
    Henning, Tobias
    Slavtchev, Viktor
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Hochschule, Innovation, Region: Wissenstransfer im räumlichen Kontext2007Book (Other academic)
  • 3. Fritsch, Michael
    et al.
    Henning, Tobias
    Slavtchev, Viktor
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Hochschulen als regionaler Innovationsmotor? Innovationstransfer aus Hochschulen und seine Bedeutung für die regionale Entwicklung2008Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fuchs, Heather M.
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Lübcke, Thomas
    German Maritime Search and Rescue Service.
    Intuition or deliberation – How do professionals make decisions in action?2015In: ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings: The 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] L. Palen, M. Buscher, T. Comes, and A. Hughes, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research on decision-making in action, we still know little about when decision-makers rely on deliberate vs. intuitive decision-making in decision situations under complexity and uncertainty. This paper studies decision-making modes (deliberate vs. intuitive) in complex task environments contingent on perceived complexity, experience, and decision style preference. We find that relatively inexperienced decision-makers respond to increases in subjective complexity with an increase in deliberation and tend to follow their decision style preference. Experienced decision-makers are less guided by their decision preference and respond to increases in subjective complexity only minimally. Our paper contributes to a developing stream of research linking decision-making with intra-personal and environmental properties and fosters our understanding of the conditions under which decision-makers rely on intuitive vs. deliberate decision modes. In doing so, we go one step further towards a comprehensive theory of decision-making in action.

  • 5. Kohblank, Tina
    et al.
    Leichsenring, Janine
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Kosteneffizienz und Sicherheit -  Ein Zielkonflikt? Eine explorative Untersuchung am Beispiel der Polizei2009Report (Other academic)
  • 6. Lübcke, T.
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wilhelm, H.
    Maurer, I.
    How core actors coordinate distal actors in organizational routines2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Lübcke, Thomas
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Research results: Decision making in Maritime Search & Rescue (2012-2015)2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Lübcke, Thomas
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Resilienz von Hochleistungsteams2015In: Resilienz in Organisationen stärken – Vorbeugung und Bewältigung von kritischen Situationen / [ed] Uwe Bargstedt, Günter Horn & Amanda van Vegten, Frankfurt: Verlag für Polizeiwissenschaft, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lübcke, Thomas
    et al.
    German Maritime Search and Rescue Service, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Bornhorst, Claus
    Rossner, Patrick
    Technische Universität Chemnitz, Germany.
    Inter-organizational simulation as a training opportunity for maritime search and rescue (SAR) missions2016In: Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE 2016) and the Affiliated Conferences / [ed] Tareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, Springer, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maritime disasters are extremely rare in the western world. However, when they do occur, there are often no second chances. As a result, the responsible maritime authorities, organizations with rescue units, and passing vessels who assist spontaneously must cooperate harmoniously to increase the probability of success. In order to be well prepared for in emergency situations, organizations must learn to work together, while SAR personnel must gain extensive experience. Because such situations are so rare, this is best done through extensive practice and realistic exercises. Unfortunately, effective training opportunities concerning complex maritime incidents are very limited, mainly due to their high costs, potential risks to participants in live SAR exercises, and a limited number of participating SAR personnel. As a result, there is a general need for additional training and exercises for seagoing authorities. The joint R&D project “Maritime Simulators Network” (MAR-SimNET) aims to provide such training. Most restrictions of live SAR exercises can be solved by using simulations. Due to its wide-spread acceptance as a training tool for shipping and seagoing organizations, ship handling simulation represents a valuable starting point for developing such training programs. To date, the main purpose of ship handling simulation in the training of nautical personnel is to obtain more experience in difficult navigational situations. More recently, bridge resource management and the training of soft skills have become additional topics in simulator-based training of navigating officers. An additional type of simulator that is used for the development of effective SAR simulation training programs is the communications simulator. This type of simulator is often used in relation to global maritime distress and safety systems (GMDSS) devices. Previously, it was uncommon to combine ship handling and GMDSS simulation. However, we viewed this as the first step in creating a simulator for SAR purposes. Real SAR missions do not just involve ships – according to international regulations (IAMSAR), the responsible Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) and the coastal radio stations are also important maritime SAR units. Unfortunately, MRCC simulators had not yet been developed – a problem we have also addressed with this project. The last important players in SAR missions are helicopters, which may help provide quick transportation of necessary rescue equipment and assistance to both accident victims and other assisting units on-scene as well as act as a search unit. The aim of the MAR-SimNET project was to develop a SAR mission simulator that is able to provide interorganizational training for all potentially involved authorities and organizations – i.e., bridge crews from different vessels, helicopter crews, MRCC personnel – as well as a simulated workplace for operators of coastal counties’ public-safety response teams – e. g. fire departments. In our paper, we will explain how the different stakeholder demands were transferred into an integrated interlinked SAR simulator infrastructure to implement a comprehensive human factors training for maritime disaster management and beyond.

  • 10. Mirc, Nicola
    et al.
    Véry, Phillipe
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ebers, Mark
    Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquisition integration requires emergent cooperation between individuals of two firms in order to combine and transfer resources. In this paper, we make use of social network analysis to study the influence of intra-firm network positions on individuals’ engagement in cooperations with the acquisition partner and analyze the effects of such behavior. We find that integration is mainly promoted by highly central as well as highly peripheral individuals in their intra-firm networks as well as by employees hired after the acquisition, indistinctive of their network position. When studying the benefits of integration driving cooperation, we found evidence for effects of preferential attachment and that overall rather non-cooperative behavior ensured revenue increases. Our results point towards the importance of opportunity-driven behavior when networks merge and nuance the notion of value leakage associated with acquisition integration, by suggesting that non-cooperative behavior can help compensate integration-related costs.

  • 11. Mirc, Nicola
    et al.
    Véry, Phillipe
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ebers, Mark
    Employee engagement in acquisition integration: Who cooperates and does it pay?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquisition integration requires emergent cooperation between individuals of two firms in order to combine and transfer resources. In this paper, we make use of social network analysis to study the influence of intra-firm network positions on individuals’ engagement in cooperations with the acquisition partner and analyze the effects of such behavior. We find that integration is mainly promoted by highly central as well as highly peripheral individuals in their intra-firm networks as well as by employees hired after the acquisition, indistinctive of their network position. When studying the benefits of integration driving cooperation, we found evidence for effects of preferential attachment and that overall rather non-cooperative behavior ensured revenue increases. Our results point towards the importance of opportunity-driven behavior when networks merge and nuance the notion of value leakage associated with acquisition integration, by suggesting that non-cooperative behavior can help compensate integration-related costs.

  • 12. Pawlowsky, P.
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Lernen von Hochleistungsteams2010In: Jahrbuch Personalentwicklung 2010: Ausbildung, Weiterbildung, Management Development / [ed] Karlheinz Schwuchow, Joachim Gutmann, Köln: Hermann Luchterhand Verlag , 2010, p. 61-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13. Pawlowsky, Peter
    et al.
    Mistele, Peter
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Quellen der Hochleistung: Theoretische Grundlagen und empirische Befunde2008In: Hochleistungsmanagement: Leistungspotenziale in Organisationen gezielt fördern / [ed] Pawlowsky, P., Mistele, P., Wiesbaden: Gabler Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, 2008, p. 33-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Pawlowsky, Peter
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Die HIPE-Formel: empirische Analysen von Hochleistungsteams2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In verschiedenen Kontexten erbringen Teams exzellente Leistungen: Gourmet-Köche erringen mit ihren Teams die höchsten Würden ihrer Kunst, herausragende Segelteams wetteifern in einem Extremrennen rund um die Welt miteinander, Notfallrettungsteams ringen um das Leben ihrer Patienten, Unternehmen sind in der Lage, sich durch besondere Leistungen nachhaltig von ihrer Vergleichsgruppe abzusetzen. Leistung ist dabei nicht nur eine Frage des „was?“ sondern vielmehr des „wie?“. Höchstleistungen sind in allen Organisationen und Umwelten möglich. Höchstleister sind Teams oder Organisationen, denen es gelingt sich nachhaltig an der Spitze ihrer Vergleichsgruppe zu etablieren. Im Rahmen des Forschungsprojektes HIPE (High Performance) wurde untersucht inwieweit es zwischen Hochleistungsteams, die unter sehr unterschiedlichen Bedingungen arbeiten, Gemeinsamkeiten gibt und inwieweit diese Ergebnisse generell auf Wirtschaftsorganisationen übertragbar sind. Hoch dekorierte Gourmet Küchen, die besten Luftrettungsteams, die weltbesten Segelteams, Spitzen Symphonieorchester, herausragende mittelständische Unternehmen und Top Instandhaltungsteams in der Automobilindustrie wurden mit qualitativen und quantitativen Methoden in ihren Wirkungsmechanismen in der Tiefe durchleuchtet. Das Buch analysiert die Entstehungsbedingungen von Hochleistung, beschreibt die Hochleistungsprozesse in den Teams und zeigt konkrete Möglichkeiten zum Transfer von Hochleistungsprinzipien auf.

  • 15. Pawlowsky, Peter
    et al.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Kneisel, E.
    Die Rote Königin überlisten: Strategisches Management aus dem Blickwinkel der Hochleistungsforschung2008In: Strategisches Management zwischen Globalisierung und Regionalisierung / [ed] Götze, Uwe & Lang, Rainhart, Wiesbaden: Gabler Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, 2008, p. 41-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Semrau, Thorsten
    et al.
    Trier University, Trier, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Team political skill and team performance2017In: Journal of Managerial Psychology, ISSN 0268-3946, E-ISSN 1758-7778, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relation between team political skill, i.e., the mean level of political skill among team members, and team performance. Specifically, it proposes that the link between team political skill and team performance is ambiguous and contingent upon a common professional background as well as collective team commitment within the team.

    Design/methodology/approach: Data from 45 service teams with 295 team members and their supervisors were analyzed. Hypotheses were tested using OLS regression. Findings: The results show that a common professional background and collective team commitment serve as crucial contingencies for the relationship between team political skill and team performance.

    Research limitations/implications: This study complements previous individual-level research demonstrating a positive relation between political skill and relevant outcomes by highlighting that the link between team political skill and team performance is ambiguous and contingent upon other team characteristics.

    Practical implications: To enhance team performance, managers should carefully consider the interplay between team political skill and other team characteristics when making staffing decisions.

    Originality/value: The study highlights the relation of political skill with team performance and points to a potential downside of political skill in organizations.

  • 17.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Emotions in sensemaking: a change management perspective2015In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 432-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Following various calls for research, the purpose of this paper is to adopt theories of emotion and action to understand the affective dimension of sensemaking processes in organizational change endeavors.

    Design/methodology/approach - This paper is conceptual in nature, introducing theories from psychology, in particular dual processing theory and the somatic marker hypothesis, to the field of intra-and inter-personal sensemaking in change processes.

    Findings - The author discusses how emotions shape sensemaking and thus the perception of change events and how four discrete emotions (anger, fear, anxiety, hope) shape content and motivational strength of sensemaking accounts, influence the likelihood that a person will engage in sensegiving activities and will be willing to accept inter-personal sensemaking outcomes. The author proposes that emotions are an input to as well as an outcome of sensemaking processes.

    Research limitations/implications - Although this research builds on a strong empirical basis, is conceptual in nature. Future research might test the relationships suggested in this paper empirically.

    Practical implications - The findings suggest that the management of affective reactions of people subjected to change processes might be a field currently not sufficiently accounted for in change management. Active emotion management might be a way to steer change processes in a positive way for all the stakeholders involved.

    Originality/value - The conceptualization presented here contributes to the often requested development of a conceptual model integrating emotions into the sensemaking perspective. The introduction of distinct emotions and the grounding in multi-disciplinary theory as well as the strong implications for change management theory and practice make this contribution valuable.

  • 18.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Technischen Universität, Chemnitz.
    Ergebnisheterogenität in der Strategischen Managementforschung - Analyse und Lösungsmöglichkeiten2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation thesis contrasts various explanations for heterogeneity in strategic management research findings using meta-analytical techniques. I evaluate research results for a well-known research questions in strategic management research, the relation between performance and resources in the framework of resource-based view, and find that the way how the construct ‘performance’ is being operationalized explains a significant part of the observed heterogeneity in research findings, distinctly more than problems like population selection or the unclear temporal link between dependent and independent variables. Appropriation theory is shown to provide a convincing explanation for the observed outcome.

  • 19.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Linking integration team composition to PMI plan adherence in the first three month after closure2013In: Academy of Management Proceedings, 2013: (Meeting Abstract Supplement) 15412, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an ongoing research effort analyzing real-life project documentation data on post-acquisition integration cases provided by four business consultancies. I examine the effect of involving members of the target firm in workstream-level integration teams on implementation delays in the first three month of an integration project. From a theoretical perspective, such an involvement can have positive (sensegiving and human resource perspective) as well as negative effects (stakeholder power perspective). In this paper, I discuss the theoretical argument for both and explore likely contingencies, focusing on jobs lost during integration and the distribution of job losses over target and acquirer. The data examined here shows that these contingencies are indeed important: If many jobs are lost and if these jobs are lost mostly at the acquired firm, the effect of target firm involvement in integration teams is negative.

  • 20.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Only a matter of chance? How firm performance measurement impacts study results2014In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 46-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although strategic management research is well aware of the importance of construct measurement, surprisingly little rigor is applied regarding its core concept, firm performance. Using the example of the resource-based view (RBV), this paper demonstrates how divergence between theory-building and construct measurement regarding firm performance can produce misleading conclusions. The RBV seeks to explain value creation in the marketplace, yet empirical studies often measure various aspects of firm financial performance. Building on appropriation theory, I show that it is not possible to infer to changes in firm value creation from observed changes in firm financial performance measures and vice versa due to an omitted variable bias: the neglect of the relative bargaining power of stakeholders. This paper derives conclusions for research practice and suggests theoretically meaningful ways of bridging the gap between value creation and firm financial performance in the RBV framework. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Organizing for the Big One – A review of case studies on multi-agency disaster response and a research agenda2015In: ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings: The 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] L. Palen, M. Buscher, T. Comes, and A. Hughes, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disaster response operations exceed the capacities of each single organization and thus require cooperation by at least two, often up to some hundred agencies who do seldom interact in their daily operations. The result is a complex problem of cognition, coordination, command and control. This paper presents a review of empirical studies on multi-agency coordination in disaster response operations in order to initiate and facilitate cross-case learning. The review covers 72 empirical studies and highlights the importance of themes such as plans and plan enactment, leadership or personal acquaintance of actors in emergent multi-agency response networks. The analysis also shows that while some themes received extensive coverage in scholarly publications (e.g. training, skills), various important topics have not been studied in sufficient depth (e.g. development of common operational pictures, plan enactment). Based on these insights, the review develops a research agenda and derives various recommendations for practical disaster response management.

  • 22.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Organizing for the Big One: A Review of case studies and a research agenda for multi-agency disaster response2016In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 60-72Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disaster response operations require the cooperation of agencies that seldom interact in their daily operations. The result is a complex coordination problem, which has been in the focus of many case studies. In an effort to facilitate cross-case learning, this study presents a review of empirical studies on the multi-agency coordination of disaster response operations. The review covers 80 empirical studies and highlights the importance of training, expertise, planning and plan enactment, leadership and personal acquaintance between the actors in emergent multi-agency response networks. The analysis results also show that while some areas have received extensive coverage in scholarly publications (e.g., training, skills), a number of important topics have yet to be studied in sufficient depth (e.g., leadership and role taking, plan enactment). Based on these insights, a research agenda is proposed and a number of recommendations for practical disaster response management are made.

  • 23.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Power shifts in organizations: the role of high-performance work systems2013In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, ISSN 0958-5192, E-ISSN 1466-4399, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1165-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the effects of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on the rent appropriation of employees and shareholders in firms from the viewpoint of appropriation theory. Applying a meta-analytical approach I test the hypothesis that HPWS shift the balance of power between stakeholder groups in an organization, favouring employees over other stakeholders. This hypothesis is confirmed. However, the overall results of HPWS are positive for both stakeholder groups, as HPWS also increase firm value creation. My study also emphasizes the need to decompose the construct firm performance' into value creation and value distribution among stakeholder groups. Directions for future research and recommendations for management practice conclude the paper.

  • 24. Steigenberger, Norbert
    Sensemaking, sensegiving, and emotions in organizational change processes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Seminar for Business Administration, Corporate Development and Organization University of Cologne, Germany.
    The challenge of integration: A review of the M&A integration literature2017In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 408-431Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of acquired or merging firms is a key driver of the success or failure of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Over the last 30 years, a substantial body of research has addressed M&A integration, offering rich but widely dispersed insights into this phenomenon. This paper takes stock of the current knowledge, based on a review of articles published in scholarly journals. The review advances the conceptual understanding of the phenomenon by inductively developing an overarching framework for the M&A integration literature, where integration success is a function of context, structural and communication-based interventions, which interact with collective sensemaking processes and negotiations among integration stakeholders. Based on this framework, a research agenda is suggested. I proposes that, in particular, the interaction between structural interventions and leadership warrants further study. Also, little is known about integration project management and integration team composition or the interaction between integration context and collective sensemaking processes. Finally, there is a shortage of research on temporal dynamics within integration projects. The review demonstrates that M&A scholars made substantial progress regarding our understanding of the M&A integration process, yet much remains to be done.

  • 26.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Why Supporters Contribute to Reward-based Crowdfunding2017In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 336-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the motivation of supporters to contribute resources to reward-based crowdfunding campaigns.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper reports results from a survey combining open and closed questions, addressing supporters of reward-based crowdfunding campaigns in the field of video game development. Publicly available data from a large crowdfunding website complements the approach.

    Findings

    Two groups of supporters emerge from the data: One group derives motivation almost exclusively from a purchasing motive, the other group displays the purchasing motive alongside an altruistic and involvement motive. There is little indication that social acknowledgement plays a role for supporter motivation. Supporters rely on the evaluation of previous activities of an entrepreneur to judge trustworthiness.

    Originality/value

    The manuscript offers empirical insights into the previously scarcely researched question why supporters contribute to reward-based crowdfunding. These insights inform research on reward-based crowdfunding and help entrepreneurs considering reward-based crowdfunding as a way to fund entrepreneurial activities.

  • 27. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Ebers, Mark
    The paradox of goal-setting and goal achievement in PMIs: Why the wrong firms set ambitious goals2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Fuchs, Heather M.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Lübcke, Thomas
    German Maritime Search and Rescue Service.
    Intuition or deliberation – How do professionals make decisions in action?2015In: Academy of Management Proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research on decision-making in action, we still know little about when decision-makers rely on deliberate vs. intuitive decision-making in decision situations under complexity and uncertainty. Building on default-interventionist dual-processing theory, this paper studies decision-making modes (deliberate vs. intuitive) in complex task environments contingent on perceived complexity, experience, and decision style preference. We find that relatively inexperienced decision-makers respond to increases in subjective complexity with an increase in deliberation and tend to follow their decision style preference. Experienced decision-makers are less guided by their decision preference and respond to increases in subjective complexity only minimally. Our paper contributes to a developing stream of research linking decision-making with intra-personal and environmental properties and fosters our understanding of the conditions under which decision-makers rely on intuitive vs. deliberate decision modes. In doing so, we go one step further towards a comprehensive theory of decision-making in action.

  • 29.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lubcke, Thomas
    German Maritime Search and Rescue Service (DGzRS), Germany.
    Fiala, Heather
    Institute of Management Accounting and Control of the WHU - Otto Beisheim School of Management, Germany.
    Riebschlager, Alina
    Decision Modes in Complex Task Environments2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research on decision-making in action, we still know little about when decision-makers rely on deliberate vs. intuitive decision-making in decision situations under complexity and uncertainty. Building on default-interventionist dual-processing theory, this book studies decision-making modes (deliberate vs. intuitive) in complex task environments contingent on perceived complexity, experience, and decision style preference. We find that relatively inexperienced decision-makers respond to increases in subjective complexity with an increase in deliberation and tend to follow their decision style preference. Experienced decision-makers are less guided by their decision preference and respond to increases in subjective complexity only minimally. This book contributes to a developing stream of research linking decision-making with intra-personal and environmental properties and fosters our understanding of the conditions under which decision-makers rely on intuitive vs. deliberate decision modes. In doing so, we go one step further towards a comprehensive theory of decision-making in action.

  • 30. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Lübcke, Thomas
    Spannungsfeld Anspruch – Hochleistungsorganisationen zwischen Stakeholder-Orientierung und internen Erwartungen2009In: Journal Arbeit, ISSN 1619-4020, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 15-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Mirc, N.
    A Configurational Approach to Identification and Employee Retention after an Acquisition Event2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retaining employees is a critical predictor of success or failure in many post-acquisition integration projects. Social identification strongly affects employees’ intentions to remain with or leave a firm after an acquisition. In the last years, a strong understanding developed that specifically identification with the organization affects an employee’s intention to leave or to stay within the new organization. This article suggests that organizational identification alone is not sufficient to bring employees to stay. We employ a social identity perspective to exploratively study combinations of conditions that need to be in place alongside organizational identification for employees to develop a strong intention to leave or to stay after an acquisition. Building on a mixed method approach combining fuzzy-set methodology (fsQCA) with qualitative data, our analysis shows a nuanced picture of how multi-focus identification patterns influence employee retention. The paper highlights the configurations of conditions that need to be present for identification to transfer into behavior and shows that the combinations that lead to strong commitment to stay are substantially different from those that lead to strong intention to leave. Based on these insights, we advance theory on contingency conditions for the identification-retention relationship from a social identity perspective. 

  • 32.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Mirc, Nicola
    Toulouse School of Management, France.
    How employees make sense of and respond to post-acquisition integration events: Do different foci of identification matter?2016In: Manageable Cooperation?: 16th Annual conference of the European Academy of Management, Brussels: European Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research often conceptualized sensemaking in changing organizations as a process homogenous over the affected employees (Ashforth et al., 2014; Balogun and Johnson, 2005). Building on Lockett et al.s’ (2014) perspective on sensemaking as a process affected by context, we discuss and show that this might be an over-simplification. In a mixed-method study of two post-acquisition integration processes, we examine how identification affects employee’s intention to leave the acquired firm after the change event and how sensemaking accounts differ between persons affected by the change, contingent upon an employee’s identification. Building on social identity theory, we establish configurations of organizational and professional identification and professional occupation membership that lead to high and low intention to remain with the changing organization. We then compare sensemaking accounts between these paths. We argue that an employee’s identification with organization and occupation affects his or her sensemaking as well as his or her following behavior when an organization experiences a substantial change event. This paper extends our understanding of sensemaking during change events and contributes to opening the black box linking micro-level contingencies to behavioral outcomes in post-acquisition integration processes.

  • 33.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Mirc, Nicola
    University of Toulouse, TSM-Research, CNRS, France.
    Should I stay or should I go? Multi-focus identification and employee retention in post-acquisition integration2019In: Human Relations, ISSN 0018-7267, E-ISSN 1741-282XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retaining key employees is often one of the most crucial goals when an acquirer buys a target firm. However, what determines whether employees stay or leave once the firm has been bought? This article investigates how organizational and occupational identification influence employee exit intentions. Based on a longitudinal configurational study in two acquired hospitals, our findings challenge the popular belief that identification with the organization consistently increases retention, and we stress the important effect of occupational identification, which has been largely neglected by research on post-acquisition integration. We find that under certain conditions, occupational identification increases employees? exit intentions but that neither identification with the firm nor identification with the occupation are necessary or sufficient to entice employees to stay or leave. Instead, their effects are contingent on the professionalization of an occupation and the degree to which employees? expectations have been disappointed. Our findings further suggest that attention is an important mediating mechanism linking identification and exit intentions, as employees focus predominantly on topics that relate to the social entities they most strongly identify with. This article develops theory on the effects of social identification on exit intentions after acquisitions and contributes to research on multi-focus identification and post-acquisition integration.

  • 34. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Pawlowsky, Peter
    Determinanten der Hochleistung: Charakteristika besonders leistungsfähiger Teams2010In: Handbuch PersonalEntwickeln 141 / [ed] Laske, S., Orthey, A., Schmid, M., Köln: Wolters Kluwer, 2010, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Pawlowsky, Peter
    Lernen von Hochleistern: Welchen Nutzen haben die Erkenntnisse der Forschung zu verlässlichkeitsorientierten Organisationen für Unternehmen?2010In: Sicheres Handeln lernen: Kompetenzen und Kultur entwickeln / [ed] Peter Mistele, Uwe Bargstedt, Frankfurt: Verlag für Polizeiwissenschaft, 2010, p. 253-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Pawlowsky, Peter
    Lübcke, Thomas
    Schulte, Michael
    Leistungsmessung in der Strategischen Managementforschung – Methoden der Selektion von Hochleistern2010In: Innovationsstrategien jenseits traditionellen Managements, Berlin: Fraunhofer Verlag , 2010, p. 327-339Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37. Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Wilhelm, H.
    Talk is cheap - is it? The effect of persuasive appeals on stakeholder resource contributions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Extending Signaling Theory to Rhetorical Signals: Evidence from Crowdfunding2018In: Organization science (Providence, R.I.), ISSN 1047-7039, E-ISSN 1526-5455, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 529-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms often need to acquire external financial resources to maintain and develop their business. To attract these resources, firms employ various substantive and rhetorical signals, such as publishing press releases, showcasing prototypes of new products, and hiring renowned managers. However, despite the relevance of signals, we still know little about how they interact—whether they strengthen, weaken, or neutralize one another—in attracting resources. Traditional signaling theory downplays the importance of rhetoric while management research acknowledges its relevance, creating a disconnect between these two camps and a shortcoming that deserves further investigation. To address this shortcoming, we advance the concept of signal portfolios. Signal portfolios may combine rhetorical signals with substantive signals. We employ this concept to explain how the interaction of the two affects financial resource acquisition in high-noise environments—settings where firms send multiple signals simultaneously. Based on longitudinal data on crowdfunding, an exemplary high-noise environment, we find that rhetorical signals complement substantive signals in certain situations and, thus, strengthen their impact on a firm’s financial resource acquisition. Contrary to our expectations, however, we find that under specific conditions, rhetorical signals may also weaken the impact of substantive signals. Our research has implications for signaling theory, crowdfunding research, and management practice.

  • 39.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Talk is cheap - isn't it?: When and how substantive and rhetorical signals interact to affect stakeholder contributions to crowdfunded projects2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings, January 2016 (Meeting Abstract Supplement), 2016, article id 11643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While entrepreneurs increasingly rely on crowdfunding to finance product-development projects, we still know little about how entrepreneurs succeed at stimulating resource contributions for these projects. To better understand this relationship, we integrate signaling theory and rhetoric research to derive and test theory on signal portfolios, explaining when and how substantive and rhetorical signals interact to affect resource contributions to crowdfunded projects. We theorize positive as well as negative interaction effects between substantive and rhetorical signals, suggesting that signal complementary and redundancy drive signal-portfolio outcomes. An empirical analysis with longitudinal data covering 2,702 observations of signaling and resource contributions from 197 crowdfunded product-development projects supports our hypotheses. These insights extend signaling theory by offering a theory of signal interdependence, explaining how entrepreneurs’ signal-portfolio performance is positively or negatively affected using specific combinations of signals, and how redundancy of these signals can lead to negative outcomes.

  • 40.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Juntunen, J.
    Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations2017In: 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization: Aspirations, Interventions, Struggles, Copenhagen, July 6–8, 2017., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

  • 41.
    Wilhelm, Hendrik
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Steigenberger, Norbert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Juntunen, J.
    Expanding Performance Feedback Theory to Temporary Organizations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary organizations—such as projects—are increasingly relevant, yet organization theory on temporary organizations remains incomplete. In particular, we have little understanding of when and how temporary organizations change. Performance feedback theory, the behavioral theory of the firm’s cornerstone to explain change in organizations, provides a promising platform to address this problem. We bring together ideas on goal-based aspiration levels, time pressure, and vicarious learning to expand performance feedback theory to temporary organizations. Specifically, we theorize and test how time pressure and vicarious learning affect aspiration-level induced change in temporary organizations. We test our theory using a unique longitudinal dataset on 575 fundraising projects (7,752 observations) published on Kickstarter. Our results largely confirm our theorizing, demonstrating that performance below the aspiration level (i.e. negative performance feedback) has a non-linear effect on the change of narratives, which is attenuated by time pressure. Furthermore, performance below the aspiration level benefits vicarious learning of complex and general narratives from best-performing peers, a result that parallels temporary organizations and non-temporary organizations. We discuss implications for performance feedback theory and vicarious learning in temporary organizations.

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