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  • 1.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå Universitet.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala universitet.
    The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF Study2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, p. 1-7, article id 371905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder. Several life-style factors have been identified as risk factors for AF, but less is known about the impact of work-related stress. This study aims to evaluate the association between work-related stress, defined as job strain, and risk of AF. Methods. Data from the Swedish WOLF study was used, comprising 10,121 working men and women. Job strain was measured by the demand-control model. Information on incident AF was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between job strain and AF risk. Results. In total, 253 incident AF cases were identified during a total follow-up time of 132,387 person-years. Job strain was associated with AF risk in a time-dependent manner, with stronger association after 10.7 years of follow-up (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.10–3.36 after 10.7 years, versus HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67–1.83 before 10.7 years). The results pointed towards a dose-response relationship when taking accumulated exposure to job strain over time into account. Conclusion. This study provides support to the hypothesis that work-related stress defined as job strain is linked to an increased risk of AF.

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  • 2.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Westerholm, Peter
    Job strain and the risk of atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lindgren, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Fetal Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Blomberg, Inger
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gävle Hospital, Gävle, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sahlgren, Hanna
    Department of Women's Health, Falun Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Ingvoldstad Malmgren, Charlotta
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Fetal Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Information about first-trimester screening and self-reported distress among pregnant women and partners - comparing two methods of information giving in Sweden2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 10, p. 1243-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Balanced information before prenatal diagnosis (PND) aims to help expectant parents to make an informed choice. However, it is important that the information does not increase the expectant parents' psychological distress. The aim was to examine psychological distress among expectant parents, before and after receiving information about PND, to evaluate the possible differences between two different procedures of information giving, and to evaluate the association between satisfaction with the information and psychological distress.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    A longitudinal design, based on questionnaire data from 380 expectant parents from four counties in Sweden. The measurement points; T1, before the information about PND was given and T2, 2 weeks after the prenatal screening or 15 weeks of gestation. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Swedish version of the Cambridge Worrying Scale (CWS) measured psychological distress. The Satisfaction with Genetic Counseling Scale (SCS) measured satisfaction with information about PND.

    RESULTS:

    The rate of psychological distress was stable among the pregnant women, but decreased among their partners, after the information was received. General anxiety and the social-medical dimension of pregnancy-related worry decreased among the participants who received information, using the more distinct two-stage process (group A), but was unchanged in group B (less distinct two-stage process). Health-related worry decreased in both groups, whereas relational worry and level of depressive symptoms were unchanged in both groups.

    CONCLUSION:

    Information about PND does not increase the psychological distress among expectant parents. A more distinct two-stage process of information giving might even decrease their anxiety.

  • 4.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    The digitalised work environment: Health, experiences and actions2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this thesis was to examine the association between technostress, operationalised as information and communication technology (ICT) demands, and indicators of work-related stress, as well as its association with self-rated health. Additional aims were to identify occupational groups at risk with regard to ICT demands, and to describe experiences of technostress and how it was handled by healthcare managers.

    Methods: The thesis includes four individual papers. Papers I–III have a quantitative (cross-sectional or prospective) study design and are based on data derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) and collected between 2006 and 2016. Data was analysed by statistical methods, such as linear and logistic regression analysis. Paper IV has a qualitative study design and is based on data from 20 semi-structured interviews with healthcare managers. The data was analysed using the critical incident technique.

    Results: ICT demands were correlated with job strain and effort-reward imbalance, especially the demands and effort dimensions of these measures. High ICT demands were associated with suboptimal self-rated health in cross-sectional analyses and in prospective analyses including repeated measurement. Managers, and particularly ‘managers in healthcare and other community services’, followed by ‘managers in education’, had the highest odds ratio of ICT demands, in comparison with both ‘non-managers’ and ‘all other managers’. Healthcare managers’ experiences of technostress could be categorised into the main areas ‘negative aspects of digital communication’, ‘poor user experience of ICTs’ and ‘needs to improve organisational resources’. The actions they took to cope with technostress were categorised into the main areas ‘culture, norms and social support’, ‘individual resources’ and ‘organisational resources’.

    Conclusions: Technostress operationalised as ICT demands is associated with suboptimal self-rated health. Occupational groups differ in their exposure to ICT demands by industry and position. Organisational efforts to ensure a sustainable and healthy digital work environment are warranted. ICT demands should be assessed against ICT resources for a comprehensive understanding of their association with health.

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  • 5.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Maria, Nordin
    Umeå universitet.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stockholms universitet.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholms universitet.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology demands at work and development of suboptimal self-rated health: Prospective findings from the SLOSH study2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Maria, Nordin
    Umeå universitet.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stockholms universitet.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholms universitet.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology demands: The association with job strain and effort-reward imbalance in different socioeconimic strata2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Department of Psychology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology stress at work and development of suboptimal self-rated health2016In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 1, p. A150-A151, article id P091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Information and communication technology (ICT) stress is a new type of work-related stress, which is common in modern working life. The prospective association between ICT stress and health have not previously been examined, to the best of our knowledge. The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between exposure of ICT stress and development of suboptimal self-rated health, including potential differences in this association due to sex or socioeconomic status (SES).

    Methods A prospective design was applied, utilising data from three waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). The analytical sample comprised 4468 gainfully employed people (1941 men, 2527 women, mean age 47.3 years) with good self-rated health at baseline. ICT stress was measured at two points of time, two years apart, and self-rated health was measured at follow-up two years later. Logistic regression analyses were used to derive odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

    Results In the total study sample, exposure of ICT stress at two points of time was associated with suboptimal self-rated health at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI: 1.06–1.70], adjusted for age, sex, SES, lifestyle, BMI, job strain and social support). This association was stronger in men (OR 1.53 [CI: 1.09–2.16]) than in women (OR 1.17 [CI: 0.85–1.62]). Regarding SES, ICT stress exposure at two point of time was more prevalent in participants with high SES, but in the multivariable adjusted analyses, the strongest association between ICT stress and suboptimal self-rated health was observed among participants with low SES (OR 1.67 [CI: 1.04–2.66]), adjusted for age, sex, SES, lifestyle, BMI, job strain and social support).

    Conclusion Exposure of ICT stress at two point of time was associated with increased risk of developing suboptimal self-rated health during follow-up, especially among men and in low SES groups.

  • 8.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology demands at work: the association with job strain, effort-reward imbalance and self-rated health in different socio-economic strata2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 7, p. 1049-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is common in modern working life. ICT demands may give rise to experience of work-related stress. Knowledge about ICT demands in relation to other types of work-related stress and to self-rated health is limited. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the association between ICT demands and two types of work-related stress [job strain and effort-reward imbalance (ERI)] and to evaluate the association between these work-related stress measures and self-rated health, in general and in different SES strata.

    METHODS: This study is based on cross-sectional data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health collected in 2014, from 14,873 gainfully employed people. ICT demands, job strain, ERI and self-rated health were analysed as the main measures. Sex, age, SES, lifestyle factors and BMI were used as covariates.

    RESULTS: ICT demands correlated significantly with the dimensions of the job strain and ERI models, especially with the demands (r = 0.42; p < 0.01) and effort (r = 0.51; p < 0.01) dimensions. ICT demands were associated with suboptimal self-rated health, also after adjustment for age, sex, SES, lifestyle and BMI (OR 1.49 [95 % CI 1.36-1.63]), but job strain (OR 1.93 [95 % CI 1.74-2.14) and ERI (OR 2.15 [95 % CI 1.95-2.35]) showed somewhat stronger associations with suboptimal self-rated health.

    CONCLUSION: ICT demands are common among people with intermediate and high SES and associated with job strain, ERI and suboptimal self-rated health. ICT demands should thus be acknowledged as a potential stressor of work-related stress in modern working life.

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  • 9.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study2019In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 717-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

    Methods

    A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

    Results

    In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

    Conclusion

    Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

  • 10.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Technostress operationalised as information and communication technology (ICT) demands among managers and other occupational groups: results from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health (SLOSH)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Healthcare managers’ experiences of technostress and the actions they take to handle it – a critical incident analysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
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