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  • 1.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ADULT.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population2018Inngår i: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, nr 5, s. 422-428Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

    METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

    CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 2.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, nr 1, s. 290-298Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. Design: Cross-sectional.

    Methods: A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (≥9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.

    Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.

    Conclusion: Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 3.
    Finkel, D.
    et al.
    Indiana University, USA.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Longitudinal trends in functional biological age: Impact of lifestyle factors2015Inngår i: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, s. 61-61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Finkel, Deborah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal trajectories of functional biological age: Comparisons across gender2017Inngår i: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 47, nr 4, s. 375-382Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We used an alternate age variable, functional biological age (fBioAge), which was based on performance on functional body measures. The aim was to examine development of fBioAge across the adult life span, and to also examine potential gender differences and genetic and environmental influences on change with age. We used longitudinal data (n = 740; chronological age (ChronAge) range 45-85 at baseline) from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The rate of increase in fBioAge was twice as fast after ChronAge 75 than before. fBioAge was higher in women than in men. fBioAge was fairly equally influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Whereas the rate of ChronAge cannot vary across time, gender, or individual, our analyses demonstrate that fBioAge does capture these within and between individual differences in aging, providing advantages for fBioAge in the study of aging effects.

  • 5.
    Palmer, Kathy
    et al.
    Department of Psychology,Stockholm University,Stockholm,Sweden.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Department of Neurobiology,Care Sciences and Society,Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm,Sweden.
    Ahmed, Tanvir
    International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Cornelius, Christel
    Aging Research Centre, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Aging Research Centre, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Prevalence of dementia and factors associated with dementia in rural Bangladesh: data from a cross-sectional, population-based study2014Inngår i: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 26, nr 11, s. 1905-1915Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are currently no published reports of dementia prevalence or factors associated with dementia occurrence in Bangladesh. The aims are to report the prevalence of definite and questionable dementia in rural Bangladesh, and examine factors potentially associated with dementia occurrence, including sociodemographic, clinical, social, and nutritional factors.

    Methods: We used data from a population-based, cross-sectional study from Matlab, in rural Bangladesh, on 471 persons aged 60+ years. Participants underwent a clinical examination including diagnosis of somatic disorders, and a structured interview including questions about sociodemographic and social factors.  Nutritional status was measured with the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and blood tests were conducted to assess a range of nutritional and clinical aspects. Age- and sex-specific dementia prevalence was calculated.  Crude and adjusted logistic regression was used to examine associations between dementia and clinical,  social, and nutritional factors. Dementia was diagnosed using a two-step procedure by physicians according to DSM-IV criteria.

    Results: The prevalence of questionable dementia was 11.5% and definite dementia was 3.6%. Dementia prevalence increased with increasing years of age (adjusted OR: 1.04; 95% CI = 1.002–1.1) and decreased with more years of education (adjusted OR: 0.8; 95% CI = 0.6–0.99). Being malnourished increased the odds of dementia almost six-fold (adjusted OR: 5.9; 95% CI = 1.3–26.3), while frequent participation in social activities was associated with a decreased odds (adjusted OR: 0.5; 95% CI = 0.2–0.9).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of dementia in rural Bangladesh is similar to other countries in the South Asia region, but lower than reports from other world regions. Malnutrition is strongly associated with dementia occurrence, and is a relevant area for future research within low-income countries.

  • 6.
    Persson, N
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lavebratt, C
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Synergy effects of HbA(1c) and variants of APOE and BDNFVal(66)Met explains individual differences in memory performance2013Inngår i: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, ISSN 1074-7427, E-ISSN 1095-9564, Vol. 106, s. 274-282Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed at exploring if synergy effects of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met, Apolipoprotein E (APOE) and HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) could explain individual differences in memory performance over 10 years in a population based sample of nondemented adults (N = 888, 35–85 years at baseline). Episodic memory was affected by such agents, wheras semantic memory was spared. Both age and HbA1c were associated with episodic memory decline. BDNF66Met carriers with higher HbA1c levels evidenced slope decline in episodic recall. We found support for joint effects of BDNFVal66Met × APOE × HbA1c and BDNFVal66Met × APOE × age on rates of episodic memory change over ten years, after controlling for age, sex, education and cardiovascular diseases. We conclude that variants of genetic polymorphisms act in synergy with long-term blood glucose control in shaping patterns of cognitive aging.

  • 7.
    Robins Wahlin, Tarja-Brita
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld.
    Luszcz, Mary A.
    School of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, S.A., Australia.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Byrne, Gerald J.
    School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld.
    Non-verbal and verbal fluency in prodromal Huntington’s disease2015Inngår i: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 517-529Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study examines nonverbal (design) and verbal (phonemic and semantic) fluency in prodromal Huntington’s disease (HD). An accumulating body of research indicates subtle deficits in cognitive functioning among prodromal mutation carriers for HD. Methods: Performance was compared between 32 mutation carriers and 38 noncarriers in order to examine the magnitude of impairment across fluency tasks. The Predicted Years To Onset (PYTO) in mutation carriers was calculated by a regression equation and used to divide the group according to whether onset was predicted less than 12.75 years (HD+CLOSE; n=16) or greater than 12.75 years (HD+DISTANT; n=16). Results: The results indicate that both nonverbal and verbal fluency are sensitive to subtle impairment in prodromal HD. HD+CLOSE group produced fewer items in all assessed fluency tasks compared to noncarriers. HD+DISTANT produced fewer drawings than noncarriers in the nonverbal task. PYTO correlated significantly with all measures of nonverbal and verbal fluency. Conclusion: The pattern of results indicates that subtle cognitive deficits exist in prodromal HD, and that less structured tasks with high executive demands are the most sensitive in detecting divergence from the normal range of functioning. These selective impairments can be attributed to the early involvement of frontostriatal circuitry and frontal lobes.

  • 8.
    Robins Wahlin, Tarja-Brita
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Byrne, Gerald J.
    School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Episodic Learning and Memory in Prodromal Huntington’s Disease: The Role of Multimodal Encoding and Selective Reminding2015Inngår i: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 6, nr 11, s. 876-886Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated episodic memory in prodromal HD. Three groups were compared (N=70): mutation carriers with less than 12.5 years to disease onset (n=16), mutation carriers with 12.5 or more years to disease onset (n=16), and noncarriers (n=38). Episodic memory was assessed using the Fuld Object Memory Evaluation, which includes multimodal presentation and selective reminding, and the Claeson-Dahl Learning Test which includes verbal repeated presentation and recall trials. Both carrier groups demonstrated deficient episodic memory compared to noncarriers. The results suggest deficient episodic memory in prodromal HD, and that inconsistent retrieval contributes to these deficits. Multimodal presentation attenuates the deficits.

  • 9.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Indiana University Sotheast, USA.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Genetic and environmental influences on longitudinal changes in functional biological age2015Inngår i: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 45, nr 6, s. 688-688Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Division of Nursing, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A cross-cultural perspective on aging and memory: Comparisons between Bangladesh and Sweden2012Inngår i: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0252, E-ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 1, nr 2, s. 69-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on cognitive aging have been conducted in high-income countries (mainly on Western populations). The main aim of this study was to compare the relative importance of predictors of episodic and semantic memory performance in older people (≥ 60years) from Bangladesh (n = 400) and Sweden (n = 1,098). Hierarchical regression models were used in order to study the importance of some commonly used predictors in the two countries. A main finding was that variations in age did not have much impact on episodic and semantic memory performance in Bangladesh. Instead, sex was a strong predictor for semantic memory performance. In Sweden this pattern was reversed. In the Western world, chronological age is believed to be strongly associated with memory performance in cross-sectional studies, particularly in people greater than 60 years of age. This study indicates that the difference between the two countries (in relative importance of the predictors included in this study) is mainly due to the fact that years of education is connected to age in the Western world but to sex in Bangladesh. It remains to be examined whether earlier selective survival is also responsible for the relative absence of cognitive age differences in Bangladesh.

  • 11.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Palmer, Katie
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kabir, Zarina N.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasan, Mohammed I.
    International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Associations between functional biological age and cognition among older adults in rural Bangladesh: Comparisons with chronological age2019Inngår i: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 31, nr 5, s. 814-836Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We constructed a functional biological age (fBioAge) indicator by using four functional variables: grip strength, forced expiratory lung volume, visual acuity, and hearing. Our aim was to compare how chronological age (ChronAge) and fBioAge are related to cognitive abilities in older adults.

    Method: We used data from the Poverty and Health in Aging project, Bangladesh. Participants (N = 400) were 60+ years of age and diagnosed as nondemented. Examined cognitive abilities were four episodic memory measures (including recall and recognition), two verbal fluency indicators, two semantic knowledge, and two processing speed tasks.

    Results: fBioAge accounted for cognitive variance beyond that explained by ChronAge also after controlling for medical diagnoses and blood markers.

    Discussion: Compared with ChronAge, fBioAge was a stronger predictor of cognition during a broad part of the old adult span. fBioAge seems, in that respect, to have the potential to become a useful age indicator in future aging studies. 

  • 12.
    Sundgren, M.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cognitive function did not improve after initiation of natalizumab treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. A prospective one-year dual control group study2016Inngår i: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, ISSN 2211-0348, E-ISSN 2211-0356, Vol. 10, s. 36-43Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and has severe implications. Natalizumab (NZ) has documented effects on relapse rate and radiological disease activity in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) but studies regarding its specific effects on cognitive functioning are few. Previous studies have reported improvement, however, often lacking relevant control groups. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive effects of NZ treatment, compared to patients on stable first-line treatment and healthy control subjects.

    Methods: MS patients starting NZ (MS-NZ), MS controls with stable interferon beta therapy (MS-C) and healthy control subjects (HC) were evaluated twice with one year interval, using a cognitive test battery covering six cognitive domains. The effects of NZ on levels of self-reported depression, fatigue, daytime sleepiness and perceived health were also examined.

    Results: MS patients (MS-NZ and MS-C) had significantly lower baseline cognitive performance compared to HC (global score, p=0.002), but there were no significant differences between MS-NZ and MS-C. At follow-up, both MS-NZ and MS-C had improved significantly in four and five cognitive domains, respectively, and in global score (p=0.013 and p<0.001, respectively). HC improved significantly in three cognitive domains but not in global score. A regression analysis including baseline cognitive z-score and z-score change showed that participants with lower baseline scores had a significantly greater improvement, compared to those with better initial performance (p=0.021). There were no significant changes in depression, fatigue, daytime sleepiness or perceived health in MS-NZ or MS-C.

    Conclusions: Initiation of NZ therapy did not result in true cognitive improvement over one year. Presumably, the increased test performance in both MS groups was artificial and due to retest effects that were stronger in patients with lower baseline performance. Adequate control groups are essential when evaluating cognitive functioning in intervention trials among RRMS patients.

  • 13.
    Sundgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nikulin, Vadim V.
    Neurophysics Group, Department of Neurology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité – University Medicine Berlin, Germany.
    Maurex, Liselotte
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    P300 amplitude and response speed relate to preserved cognitive function in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis2015Inngår i: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 126, nr 4, s. 689-697Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To explore if cognitive impairment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is associated with abnormal neural function and if there is evidence of neural compensatory mechanisms.

    METHODS:

    Seventy-two RRMS patients and 89 healthy control subjects were included in a cross-sectional study. Event-related brain potential (P300) and response time (RT) were recorded with visual and auditory choice reaction tasks. Cognitive function was evaluated with an 18 item test battery.

    RESULTS:

    Patients had a decrease in cognitive function (p<0.001 for global score) and increased visual P300 amplitude frontally. P300 amplitude was normal in other brain areas and RT was normal. P300 latency was normal except for an increase in auditory latency occipitally. Cognitive performance correlated positively with parietal P300 amplitude in patients but not in controls. Cognition had stronger correlation (negative) with RT in patients than in controls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with low P300 amplitude and long RT were more often cognitively impaired. This indicates that general factors such as signal amplitude and speed are limiting for cognitive function in RRMS patients. The increase in frontal P300 amplitude may be a compensatory effect.

    SIGNIFICANCE:

    Our findings suggest that high amplitude and fast speed may be protective against cognitive impairment.

  • 14.
    Sundgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Maurex, Liselotte
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Event related potential and response time give evidence for a physiological reserve in cognitive functioning in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis2015Inngår i: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 356, nr 1-2, s. 107-112Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Different factors may moderate the degree of cognitive deficit. The aim of the present study was to distinguish different mechanisms for cognitive reserve in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS). The effects of clinical variables (physical disability, depression), premorbid intelligence (years of education, vocabulary knowledge), visual event-related potentialmeasures (P300) and response time(RT)were studied in RRMS patients (n=71) and healthy subjects (n=89). Patients with high P300 amplitude and short RT had better cognitive performance. This effect was significantly weaker in controls. High P300 and short RT may be physiological markers of a cognitive reserve in RRMS. In contrast, the association between cognitive scores and premorbid intelligence was similar in patients and in control subjects. The effects of physiological reserve and clinical variables were studied in a hierarchical linear regression model of cognitive performance in RRMS. P300 amplitude and RT explained a considerable amount of variance in global cognitive performance (34%, p b 0.001). The effects of P300 and RTwere notmoderated by premorbid intelligence. Physical disability and depression added significantly to explained variance, and the final model accounted for 44%  (p b 0.001) of the variation. We conclude that physiological reserve is the strongest moderator of cognitive impairment in RRMS

  • 15.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi.
    Är vi beredda att leva i ett ålderslöst samhälle?2014Inngår i: Tidningen Ä, ISSN 2001-1164, nr 2, s. 38-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 16.
    Wahlin, Åke
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa. Aging research center, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of medicine, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Palmer, Katie
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa. Stockholm Brain Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Jena D.
    International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Kabir, Zarina Nahar
    Division of Nursing, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts among elderly persons in rural Bangladesh2015Inngår i: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 27, nr 12, s. 1999-2008Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression, if broadly defined, is the commonest late-life mental disorder. We examined the distribution of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts, across age, sex, literacy, and marital status, among elderly individuals residing in rural Bangladesh and participating in a population-based study on health and aging.

    Methods: Prevalence figures of depressive symptoms were assessed with SRQ20 (n = 625), and possible social network and economic associations were examined. Morbidity accounts of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts were examined for a subsample that also underwent complete medical examination (n = 471).

    Results: We selected for analyses the items that corresponded to DSM-IV criteria and constructed a dichotomous variable. The prevalence was 45%, and most pronounced among the oldest women (70%). The overall prevalence of suicidal thoughts was 23%. Being a woman, illiterate or single were all risk factors for depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. These associations remained unaccounted for by the social network and economic variables. Co-residing with a child and having a high quality of contact were protectiveof both depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. The main findings were replicated in the subsample, where it was found that morbidities were also associated with the outcomes, independently of the four main predictors.

    Conclusions: Prevalence figures for depressive symptoms among elderly in rural Bangladesh are high.  Demographic, social network, and morbidity factors are independently associated with both depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. This is the first study to report prevalence figures for depressive symptoms in this population.

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