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  • 1.
    Akhter, Naveed
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Sieger, P.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Transgenerational growth in family business portfolios: Strategies and the rural and urban context2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Blombäck, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Exploring the logics of corporate brand identity formation2012In: Corporate Communications. An International Journal, ISSN 1356-3289, E-ISSN 1758-6046, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the logics at work when companies decide what corporate features to communicate; which eventually also accounts for their corporate brands identities.  

    Design/methodology/approach: As a case in point, we focus on the concept “family business” and investigate the rationale among companies to make particular reference to being such a company on their websites – a decision we interpret as part of the corporate brand identity formation. Interviews are made with 14 CEOs in 12 small and medium-sized family enterprises in a Swedish context. We employ a discourse analysis to distinguish patterns of corporate feature selection. 

    Findings: Our results highlight how decisions that define corporate brand identity are not necessarily a consequence of rigorous marketing planning, but are sometimes made without concern for marketing matters. We identify three logics for the selection and formation of corporate brand identity features; the habit, organic and intended logics. On account of these findings, we develop a three logics model of corporate brand identity formation; proposing differences between intuitive, emergent and strategic processes. In the intuitive process, managers construct brand identity based on tradition, instinctive beliefs and self perception. In the emergent process, the decision surfaces from active interplay between self-perception among managers and the company’s identity. In the strategic process, the decision is a product of an explicit brand strategy with focus on corporate communications.

    Research limitations/implications: The sample size is small. No large firms are included. We focus on one corporate feature, namely, being family business. 

    Originality/value: Research on corporate brand identity is still largely conceptual. Drawing on empirical findings, this paper contributes to available theory and to practical insight. 

    Key words: Corporate brand management, corporate brand identity, marketing communications, family business.

  • 3.
    Evansluong, Quang
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family embeddedness in immigrants' entrepreneurial opportunity creation process2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Evansluong, Quang
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The role of family social capital in immigrants’ entrepreneurial opportunity creation processes2017In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Evansluong, Quang
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family social capital in immigrants’ entrepreneurial opportunity creation processes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lindberg, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Clusters as a take-off for glocal strategies: the Role of Social Capital2016In: Handbook of social capital and regional development / [ed] Hans Westlund, Johan P. Larsson, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 469-491Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stagell, Ulrica
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Andersson, Ann-Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Högskoleutbildning för hållbar utveckling: En kartläggning vid Jönköpings högskola2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Högre utbildning i Sverige ska enligt Högskolelagens paragraf 5 främja hållbar utveckling (Svensk högskolelag 1992:1434). Hållbar utveckling har definierats som en ”utveckling som tillfredsställer dagens behov utan att kompromissa med kommande generationers möjligheter att tillfredsställa sina behov” (United Nations, 1987). Hållbar utveckling innebär ansvarstagande för kommande generationer och utsträcker sig globalt. När ekologiska gränser överskrids kan människors möjligheter till goda liv undermineras.

    Våren 2013 fick författarna till denna rapport pedagogiska medel för att kartlägga undervisning om och för hållbar utveckling vid Högskolan i Jönköping. Syftet var att undersöka omfattningen av hållbar utveckling i undervisningen på strategisk nivå, programnivå, kursplanenivå och undervisningsnivå. Ett ytterligare syfte var att utifrån en analys av resultatet föreslå åtgärder som kan stärka högskolan i arbetet med utbildning för hållbar utveckling. Kartläggningen började med ett liknande upplägg på samtliga fackhögskolor men fick också anpassas till förutsättningarna på varje skola.

    Resultatet av kartläggningen visar skillnader mellan de olika fackhögskolorna i hur hållbarhetsfrågor inkluderas i undervisningen. Allt från att ingen kursplan innehållande hållbar utveckling identifierats till att undervisningen måste inkludera ett visst antal högskolepoäng. Kartläggningen visar också att tolkningarna av hållbar utveckling och undervisning för/om hållbar utveckling varierar mellan enskilda lärare.

    På Hälsohögskolan är området osynligt i kursplaner och inkluderandet av hållbar utveckling i undervisningen bygger på enskilda lärares engagemang. På Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation skiljer det sig mellan olika program där inslaget av hållbar utveckling varierar från att behandlas ingående till att inte synas explicit. Internationella handelshögskolan har prioriterat arbete med etiska och sociala frågor i utbildning och ekologisk hållbarhet är mindre framträdande. Det finns dock kurser som inkluderar ekologiska, sociala och ekonomiska dimensioner. Jönköpings tekniska högskola har en genomarbetad strategi för hur hållbar utveckling skall finnas med i utbildningarna. Varje utbildning skall integrera minst sex högskolepoäng.

    Sammantaget konstateras fortsatta förbättringsmöjligheter för Högskolan i Jönköping på strategisk nivå, programnivå, kursplanenivå och undervisningsnivå. Skillnader mellan bolagen, programmen och kurserna kan utnyttjas som en tillgång i förbättringsarbetet. En framgångsfaktor verkar vara att som JTH ha med hållbar utveckling i strategidokument med tydliga mål på omfattning samt att kursplaner innehåller moment som förklarar hur hållbar utveckling avhandlas. Vi rekommenderar också att tydliga mål sätts upp på varje fackhögskola och att lärare ges tid och resurser att ta del av de verktygslådor för hållbar utveckling som finns (en lista på sådana finns i rapporten). Ytterligare förslag på hur implementering kan stimuleras ges också, så som skapande av nätverk, införlivande av ämnet i högskolepedagogiska kurser samt högskolegemensamma temadagar för studenter.

  • 8.
    Lindberg, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Enhancing soci(et)al innovation and entrepreneurship by a Quadruple Helix Approach2016In: Proceedings of the 16th European Academy of Management Annual Conference, European Academy of Management (EURAM) , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the delimitations of the Triple Helix approach concerning social aspects of innovation and entrepreneurship by acknowledging the engagement of a wider range of actors and sectors in such processes of change. Instead, the article explores the potential of the Quadruple Helix approach to help identify soci(et)al needs, envision inclusive social and economic renewal, and develop innovative measures for attaining those visions. As a response to the delimited focus of the Triple Helix, the Quadruple Helix adds civil sector actors to the already acknowledged private, public and academic sector actors. The article uses three case studies from Sweden and Mexico to demonstrate how a wider range of actors and sectors can be included in processes of soci(et)al innovation and entrepreneurship. The authors were involved in the cases in a dual role of activists and researchers in line with a participatory research approach. This results distinguish how the Quadruple Helix approach serves to facilitate socially inclusive regional development by enabling the involved actors to contribute to social innovation both as professionals and volunteers to initiate tailor-made solutions for social ventures, and universities to encourage scholars and students to intertwine theoretical development and soci(et)al change.

  • 9. Lundberg, H.
    et al.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Höberg, A.
    Heritagepreneurship and regional development2015In: Proceedings of 15th European Academy of Management, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lundberg, H.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Högberg, A.
    Linnaeus University.
    Towards a conceptual model for heritagepreneurship and regional development2016In: Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation: 2015 IACUDIT Conference Proceedings / [ed] Vicky Katsoni & Anastasia Stratigea, Springer, 2016, p. 23-40Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Röster för entreprenörskap: Möjligheter och utmaningar för etablering på landsbygden2014Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stagell, Ulrica
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Education for sustainability: Transformative processes, actions and systemic change in a Swedish university2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the development of education for sustainability places attention to transformative processes and systemic changes at the university. Literature mainly studies processes to develop courses, programs and management systems but seldom investigates transformative processes and actions triggering organizational change. The objective of this paper is to identify key actions and transformative processes embodying an education for sustainability and to explore the systemic change outcomes, using the perspective of social learning. We relied on a participatory research method for the exploratory case study in a Swedish university. Our findings showed multiple key actions that resulted in five transformational processes. Together these transformative processes resulted in three systemic changes: organizational changes in sustainability perceptions, organizational changes in the working structures and educational curricula, and individual changes in perceptions and engagement on sustainability. A novel finding was that networking cross disciplinary facilitated double loop refection and worked as catalyst for other transformational processes. The result indicates that development of education for sustainability is facilitated by a combination of multiple transformative processes taking place with both top-down and bottom-up rationale. These processes generate individual and collective actions. Individual and network champions and top-managers play a key role in developing education for sustainability. In order to foster systemic change at the university, the existence of this complexity is crucial for developing education for sustainability.

  • 13.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Bender, Patrick
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Nilsson, Angelica
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    The process of becoming: Entrepreneurial leadership transition to the second generation2015In: Developing next generation leaders for transgenerational entrepreneurial family enterprises / [ed] Pramodita Sharma, Nunzia Auletta, Rocki-Lee DeWitt, Maria Jose Parada and Mohar Yusof, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 21-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brundin, EthelJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).Markowska, MagdalenaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Contextualizing entrepreneurship in emerging economies and developing countries2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship in emerging economies and developing countries presents us with a unique set of working attitudes, modes of thinking, social practices and processes. This book explores these characteristics’, focusing on the conceptualization of entrepreneurship ‘in-between’. It highlights top-down, bottom-up and hybrid initiatives as well as driving forces for entrepreneurial activities, presenting the diversity, nuances and multiplicity of facets of relevant but unexplored contexts that we need in order to expand our dominant and traditional understandings of entrepreneurship.This book examines entrepreneurship as a contextualized phenomenon from different theoretical and empirical perspectives, gathering a group of researchers with different nationalities, backgrounds and contexts to shed light on how societies with alternative paths of development trigger different entrepreneurial activities and practices. It covers geographical contexts from five continents in a novel and multifaceted analysis.Including case studies, literature reviews and discourse analysis, this book will be a valuable resource for academics and PhD students as well as programme directors in entrepreneurship, development studies and economic geography, and policymakers working with local and regional development and entrepreneurship.

  • 15.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brundin, Ethel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Markowska, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Contextualizing entrepreneurship in-between2017In: Contextualizing Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies and Developing Countries / [ed] Marcela Ramírez Pasillas, Ethel Brundin and Magdalena Markowska, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Plate, Markus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Social responsibility in family businesses: a meta-system perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Evansluong, Quang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sustainable Entrepreneurship Education: An exploratory case study of an elective course in a Swedish Business School2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Evansluong, Quang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Sustainable Entrepreneurship Undergraduate Education: A case study in Swedish Business School2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Lundberg, H.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    New everyday practices of corporate venturing in family businesses2015In: Proceedings of 15th European Academy of Management, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ramirez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Plate, Markus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Family business social responsibility: Family capital and civic engagement2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Linnaeus University.
    Embedded regional networking2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis is about the socio-economic activities of regional networks. The research objective is to explore and describe the networking activities taking place between the organisations embedded in such networks. The objective also includes studying the consequences of those networking activities for regional industrial activities as a whole.

     

    The thesis reports the findings of four papers, each dealing with different parts of the research objective and conceptual framework articulated in the introductory chapter. The empirical data was collected through case studies of the furniture industry in Lammhult, the silk industry in Como, and the furniture industry in the Metropolitan area of Jalisco.

     

    The results imply that firms, non-profit organisations, and government agencies bind together in regional networks in the three cases studied. These regional networks each have distinguishing characteristics: the particular motives for forming the network, the firms and organisations available locally, and the firms’ common area of specialisation in each case. These regional networks share some similarities in these regards, and these similarities influence the objectives, member selection, network hub selection, and initial activities of the networks. These characteristics differ among the regional networks with respect to their initiation and duration. Within a time-frame, the members of the regional network select complementary members and define specialised objectives and activities.

     

    The results also reveal that regional networks have different network activities that are characterised by distinct mixtures of temporal, spatial, social, and market embeddedness. The mixtures of different types of embeddedness result in diverse development trajectories in which regional networks have similar and different networking activities over time. The most common type of collaboration among the members of regional networks is their joint participation in international tradeshows. Regional networks develop more specialised networking activities over time, even though these activities take time – sometimes years – to be planned, co-ordinated, realised, and evaluated. The results also indicate that the networking activities of the regional networks have diverse consequences for the industrial activity in the three studied regions.

     

  • 22.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Växjö universitet, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Global Spaces for Local Entrepreneurship: Stretching clusters through networks and international trade fairs2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the insightful writings on clusters identify the role of entrepreneurs as key agents in the formation of firms and clusters. This thesis argues instead that local entrepreneurship is not ceased once firms and clusters are established; local entrepreneurship is about the continuous (re)creation of both businesses and clusters in global spaces. Global spaces for local entrepreneurship emphasises how firms collectively become an agent of continuous renewal. Firms enact an organising context materialising in networks that stretch relations and collaborations according to the issues being dealt with. These networks are localised but are extended beyond the geographical boundaries of clusters. One important example of this, which is in focus in this doctoral thesis, is that firms operating in clusters often interact with actors whom they have met at international trade fairs (ITFs). ITFs are those attractive events that individuals, firms and institutions attend temporarily to exhibit and trade products in foreign and national markets.

    This thesis is based on the work contained in a cover and five papers. Each paper contributes to the research objective and questions brought forward in the thesis cover. The empirical evidence has been mostly drawn from several case studies conducted in the Lammhult cluster in Sweden. The findings show that firms build their organising contexts in order to stretch the reach and accessibility to local and non-local actors; they jointly co-create potential opportunities. The organising contexts are mapped in networks using three proximity orders. The empirical findings report three types of situations in which there is a potential opportunity for continuous renewal. By emphasising the opportunities that can be originated when a business is not realised or when a new or improved product or process has not been generated yet, this thesis aims to stimulate a theoretical reappraisal of global spaces for local entrepreneurship. With the conceptual development of global spaces for local entrepreneurship, we put forward the idea that such spaces enhance an ability to renew firms and clusters. The underlying reason is that local entrepreneurship is centered on the social interaction between individuals, firms and/or institutions; it materialises in intended and unintended dialogical situations when there is a commitment to the continuous renewal of firms and clusters. Such dialogical situations carry with them an opportunity for co-creating new businesses, new products and new processes.

  • 23.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    EGADE Zona Centro, ITESM, Mexico, and School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    International trade fairs as amplifiers of permanent and temporary proximities in clusters2010In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 155-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptualizing proximity as a mainly geographically and more or less permanently anchored phenomenon has been shown to be insufficient in clusters; the proximity between firms also has a temporary and relational character when coupled with globalization. This paper aims to contribute to this debate, exploring the role of international trade fairs (ITFs) for amplifying permanent and temporary proximities in clusters. Combining permanent and temporary proximities, a framework is integrated to enquire how non-local foreign relations encountered at ITFs are interconnected in a cluster network. The cluster network depicts the firms that are related for business and innovation purposes at three kinds of proximity. The first kind, the intra-cluster proximity, concerns the overall local networking. The second kind, the extra-cluster proximity, comprises trans-national friendship relations, trans-national market relations, and trans-national partnerships instigated at ITFs. The third kind, the bridging proximity, includes the cases in which firms engaged at ITFs interact with firms not participating at ITFs. This paper relies on social network analysis techniques in order to examine the proximity kinds in a Swedish cluster. The findings reveal that ITFs amplify the possibilities for interconnecting local relations and transnational relations. Participation at ITFs can potentially help firms to overcome the geographical limits of clusters.

  • 24.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Tecnologico de Monterrey.
    Resituating Proximity and Knowledge Cross-fertilization in Clusters by Means of International Trade Fairs2008In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 643-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates a proximity framework and provides empirical evidence of how knowledge cross-fertilization is instigated at international trade fairs (ITFs) and continued in a cluster network. This paper applies a case study method relying on social network analysis to explore the knowledge cross-fertilization initiated at ITFs and furthered at a Swedish cluster. The findings suggest that firms participating at ITFs translate and re-articulate the acquired external knowledge through their interactions in the cluster network. Creating awareness of the ITFs' influence on innovation is significant for policy-makers and scholars.

  • 25.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Almers, Ellen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stagell, Ulrica
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Towards Multiple Approaches on Education for Sustainability: A case study of a Swedish University2015In: 8th World Environmental Education Congress – WEEC 2015, Gothenburg, 29th of June - 2nd of July, 2015, World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: While current debates on higher education are concerned with “what are we actually teaching in Education for sustainable development“ (Kopnina and Meijers 2014) or “how can we evaluate what we teach“, there is a lack of research addressing how universities are enabling change and developing new higher education approaches. Dominant educational structures across the world are based on fragmentation rather than connections and synergy to achieve a holistic approaches to education for sustainability (Wals, 2009). Education for sustainability calls for new kinds of collective learning that are centered on a transmissive nature (i.e. learning as reproduction) but rather on a transformative nature (i.e. learning as change). Embodying an active care for sustainability on higher education implies having an education for sustainability that includes socialization for democratic skills and values, and the development of a personal- and collective sense of competence (Chawla and Flanders Cushing, 2007).

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to explore how a university create approaches on education for sustainability by engaging – or not its faculty and students, and how such approaches support or not authentic sustainable citizenship. To fulfil this purpose, we rely on theory of situated learning (Lave and Wenger, 1991) and communities of practices (Wenger, 2011) to move beyond static approaches to more dynamic approaches on education for sustainability.

    Methods: We conducted a case study (Eisenhardt, 1989; Miles and Huberman, 1984; Yin 1984) to investigate how approaches to education for sustainability were changed and built in Jönkoping University. As the study progressed, there was a mixture of inductive and deductive research strategies. This means that theoretical development occurred by combining the perspectives and observation of actors with existing literature. We interviewed strategically chosen persons and analyzed official documents.

    Results: The study revealed the processes for stimulating education for sustainability in a university that allowed each school to define freely its approach to sustainability. As a result, communities of practices stimulating situated learning were originated at the university. There were a myriad of ‘working’ approaches and degrees of prioritization on education for sustainability. Such approaches emerged following different rationales. In a bottom-up rationale, institutional entrepreneurs/faculty members and students created smaller communities of practices linked to their courses and activities. In a top-down rationale a school included principles promoting sustainability. Finally, a mix rationale moved in-between those approaches.

    Conclusion: We propose that considering those rationales in a single university promotes communities of practice as well as authentic sustainable citizenship.

  • 26.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Evansluong, Quang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, United Kingdom.
    Sustainable entrepreneurship undergraduate education: A community of practice perspective2017In: Handbook of sustainability in management education: In search of a multidisciplinary, innovative and integrated approach / [ed] Jorge A. Arevalo, Shelley F. Mitchell, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 486-515Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Lundberg, Hans
    Linnaeus University.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Everyday practices as organizing context for entrepreneurial orientation in family businesses2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper builds a theoretical contribution to understand what everyday practices are drawn upon to sustain an entrepreneurial orientation in family businesses over time. Although the broader fields of organization theory and strategy have witnessed a ‘practice turn’ in recent years, entrepreneurship and family business research that draws on practice frameworks are still scarce. Everyday practices as organizing context help family members to carry out their jobs, provide them with an understanding of their situation and enhance their innovative potential; the tactical character of everyday practices makes it possible to carve out some maneuvering space in environments regulated by various dominant orders. The everyday life of the family business stimulates unintended or intended dialogical situations between family and non–family members out of which practices emerge and develops. In this paper, we introduce five such practices that prompt an entrepreneurial orientation in the family business: the practice of orchestration, the practice of systemic avoidance, the practice of socializing, the practice of recurring and the practice of tropicalization. Such practices entail recurring performance in order to become habitual accomplishments of particular actions.

  • 28.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Ägarskifte i familjeföretag och slopade skatter2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses solely on ownership transfer processes in family businesses (from parents to children). It illustrates how the abolition of gift, inheritance and wealth taxes specifically influences ownership transfer in the studied family businesses. One important reason for this study is that there are no studies that describe and analyze the effect of the abolition of the mentioned taxes on ownership transfer processes. The book presents a number of issues, problems and solutions for the ownership transfer process in light of the abolition of the taxes. One aim of this book is thereby to provide support for outgoing and incoming owners and leaders, and family business advisors in ownership transfers in relation to the abolition of those taxes. It is also directed to policy makers dealing with ownership issues.

    The book is based on a field study containing 30 telephone interviews with family business owners, and five in-depth case studies of ownership transfer processes in family businesses. All five cases describe ownership transfers from first to second generation. The studied organizations show 10 different types of ownership transfer solutions. These solutions combine different components e.g. sales within the family, external sales, gift and inheritance. Gift is the most important component of such solutions.

    The book demonstrates that the abolition of gift, inheritance and wealth taxes motivate family businesses to work more actively and purposefully with their ownership transfer. This situation is particularly so in the cases in which companies had already started discussing ownership transfer within their family, and/or with friends or advisers before the abolition of taxes was made. The case studies show that the abolition of taxes stimulates families to go through an ownership transfer, partly because they can increase their wealth with significantly less tax consequences.

  • 29.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    et al.
    Tecnologico de Monterrey.
    Sandoval-Arzaga, Fernando
    Tecnologico de Monterrey.
    Fonseca-Paredes, María Francisca
    Tecnologico de Monterrey.
    Entrepreneurship in transgenerational processes by means of social capital2011In: Understanding Entrepreneurial Family Businesses In Uncertain Environments: Opportunities and Resources in Latin America / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Giuseppe Marzano, Esteban R. Brenes, Gonzalo Jiménez, Maria Fonseca, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, 1, p. 149-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines how entrepreneurship in family businesses occurs in transgenerational processes by means of social capital. Based on an in-depth Latin American case study and a theoretical framework that combines literature of entrepreneurship, family firms and social capital, our aim is to explore the role of social capital in family businesses in realizing potential venture creation during transgenerational processes (i.e. across generations). To investigate how entrepreneurship in family businesses occurs, we specifically explore the intersections between the relational and structural dimensions of social capital (Granovetter 1992) and the autonomy and proactiveness dimensions of the entrepreneurial orientation (EO) (Lumpkin and Dess 1996). The relational and structural dimensions of social capital are relevant concepts for addressing relationships and networks when studying entrepreneurship (Johannisson et al. 2002). Autonomy and proactiveness are two dimensions of EO that are of particular relevance to understanding entrepreneurship when studying culture (Hall et al. 2001; Zahara et al. 2004). Although we do not explicitly address uncertain environments, our case research has such a component as it occurs in a Latin American business context. We show that the development of the relational and structural dimensions triggers new businesses when the older generation supports the autonomy and proactiveness of the younger generation. This in turn permits family members of the younger generation to launch improved initiatives. These initiatives range from new and/or improved products to processes and businesses. Failure of the older generation to take a step back and give freedom to younger family members can hinder, delay or disrupt the outcomes of the entrepreneurial activities across generations.

  • 30.
    Sandoval -Arzaga, Fernando
    et al.
    Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Fonseca-Paredes, María Francisca
    Tecnológico de Monterrey.
    Knowledge integration in Latin American family firms2011In: Understanding Entrepreneurial Family Businesses In Uncertain Environments / [ed] Mattias Nordqvist, Giuseppe Marzano, Esteban R. Brenes, Gonzalo Jiménez, Maria Fonseca, Che: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, 1, p. 181-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we attempt to describe the process of knowledge integration. We tie our research to the concept of familiness, which is based on the resource-based view of the firm (RBV). Our empirical focus is on seven cases of Latin American family businesses. Knowledge, as a dynamic capability, is a central issue for the family business and transgenerational entrepreneurship. Knowledge integration involves a process through which family business members overcome the individual constraints imposed by limited information and experience . In our research on Latin American family businesses, we observe that the development of knowledge is fostered through conversation and joint work between individual family business members.We propose a model to illustrate the process in which family business integrate knowledge overtime.

1 - 30 of 30
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