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  • 1.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Market innovation in the transport and heavy vehicle market2015In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual NOFOMA-Conference, Molde, 3-5 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to generate a greater understanding of the interrelatedness of new business models in the truck market and developments in the road transport sector.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on a three year research project in cooperation with a European heavy vehicle manufacturer, we present short case descriptions showing some of the main developments in the European trucking and transport markets. 

    Findings

    New business models emerge both in the heavy vehicle and transportation markets, in complex ways involving multiple actors.  The impetus for the models can come from several direction but the final impact must be negotiated and cannot be planned by a single actor.

    Research limitations/implications

    The research looks at a selection of cases and business models to demonstrate changes and the relations between the markets, and does not claim to be exhaustive in terms of the different business models in the European market. 

    Practical implications

    There is a distinct trend to greater specialization and the need for innovation to survive given the strong pressures in the commoditized transport market. Our findings show conflicting trends in terms of social implications, with improved ecological impact but the risk of worse conditions for driver. 

    Original/value

    The paper considers the development of new business models and implications on the market from the point of view of the firms actually using the business models.  This shows how different business models can co-exist and involve different types of rationalities.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    An empirical investigation of enablers for reshoring2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hertz, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    The Coordination Roles of Relief Organisations in Humanitarian Logistics2012In: IMP Asia 2012 Proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of organizations involved in relief work in general and humanitarian logistics specifically is large and increasing, creating new complexity. Our purpose here is to contribute to the development of theoretical models on coordination in the field of humanitarian logistics.  The study is based on two case studies, one showing the initial stages of the development of the Cluster System in humanitarian relief, the other the post-election crisis in Kenya.  The original cases were restructured according to our theoretical framework and analysed accordingly using coordination dimensions as the core structure. We find that the start-up of operations is skewed by the need for a clear disaster declaration for the Cluster System.  Coordination in itself is seen as controversial, but many aspects that are normally called coordination are not.  Clarity of roles is often missing in the setting, but a certain flexibility is inherently necessary since roles have to adapt to the presence of other actors.  Locally accessible resources will govern the role of the organisations over the phases.  At the same time unclear or excessively wide roles mean much higher demands on coordination.

  • 4.
    Hertz, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Agndal, Henrik
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Chalmers University of Technology and Supply Chain Management and Jönköping International Business School.
    The development of extended service models through business relationships: A Swedish trucking industry study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we ask how an extended service model is developed over time in the relationship between buyer and seller in the trucking industry.  Extended service models following a service-dominant logic rather than a product-dominant logic are becoming increasingly important in many industries.  Here we report on the initial stages of a large study on the use and development of extended service models in the Swedish market for trucks.  We see considerable promise in studying the development of the concept over time in the interaction between customer and provider. 

  • 5.
    Jahre, Marianne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Coordination in humanitarian logistics through clusters2010In: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, ISSN 0960-0035, E-ISSN 1758-664X, Vol. 40, no 8/9, p. 657-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In the field of humanitarianism, cluster thinking has been suggested as a solution to the lack of coordinated disaster response. Clusters for diverse functions, including sheltering, logistics and water and sanitation, can be viewed as an effort to achieve functional coordination. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a greater understanding of the potential of cluster concepts using supply chain coordination and inter‐cluster coordination. The focus is on the conceptual level rather than on specific means of coordination.

    Design/methodology/approach – The cluster concept in humanitarian relief, along with some key empirical issues, is based on a case study. The concept is then compared to the literature on clusters and coordination in order to develop a theoretical framework with propositions on the tradeoffs between different types of coordination.

    Findings – The results provide important reflections on one of the major trends in contemporary development of humanitarian logistics. This paper shows that there is a tradeoff between different types of coordination, with horizontal coordination inside cluster drawing attention away from important issues of the supply chain as well as the need to coordinate among the clusters.

    Research limitations/implications – There is a need for more in‐depth case studies of experiences with clusters in various operations. Various perspectives should be taken into account, including the field, responding agencies, beneficiaries, donors, military and commercial service providers, both during and between disasters.

    Practical implications – The paper presents the tradeoffs between different types of coordination, in which basic aims such as standardisation through functional coordination, must be balanced with cross‐functional and vertical coordination in order to more successfully serve the users' composite needs.

    Originality/value – The focus on possible trade‐offs between different types of coordination is an important complement to the literature, which often assumes simultaneous high degrees of horizontal and vertical coordination.

  • 6.
    Jahre, Marianne
    et al.
    Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Listou, Tore
    Norwegian Defence Command and Staff College, Oslo, Norway.
    Theory development in humanitarian logistics: A framework and three cases2009In: Management Research News, ISSN 0140-9174, E-ISSN 1758-6135, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1008-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a need for theory development within the field of humanitarian logistics to understand logistics needs in different stages of a crisis and how to meet these. This paper aims to discuss three dimensions identified in logistics and organization theories and how they relate to three different cases of humanitarian logistics operations - the regional concept of the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies, the development and working of the United Nations Joint Logistics Centre and coordination challenges of military logistics in UN mandated peacekeeping operations. The purpose is to build a framework to be used in further studies.

    Design/methodology/approach: A framework for the study of humanitarian logistics along three dimensions is developed, followed by a discussion of the chosen cases in relation to these dimensions. The framework will be used as basis for the case studies to be undertaken for the purpose of understanding and identification of new questions and needs for other or revised concepts from theory.

    Findings: The paper shows the relevance of a wide literature to the issues pertinent to humanitarian logistics. There is considerable promise in extant literature on logistics, SCM and coordination, but this needs to be confronted with the particular issues seen in the humanitarian logistics setting to achieve further theory development.

    Originality/value: The major contribution of the paper lies in its breadth of theoretical perspectives presented and combined in a preliminary theoretical framework. This is applied more specifically in the three case studies described in the paper.

  • 7.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Analyzing third-party logistics providers through the concept of position2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper

    Third-party   logistics firms have been described in a number of ways through different   role schemes based on industrial development.    This article uses one such role scheme to expand on the concept of   position for analyzing third-party logistics.   

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper   uses a case study of one third-party logistics firm involved in several   complex distribution systems within the car industry to act as a focus for   the concept of a position. 

    Findings

    The paper   shows the relevance of using a specific conception of roles to expand on the   position concept from the literature and discusses how this can be used to   analyze TPLs.

    Research limitations/implications  

    The   research is based on a single case where position was not the only aspect   studied and would benefit from other empirical data especially from smaller   and more specialized third-party logistics firms. 

    Practical implications

    The   opportunities for TPL firms are seen to depend on both how the distribution   system is structured as well as their own capacities and the roles they   already possess.

     

    What is original/value of paper

    Combining   different literatures that have studied different aspects of 3PLs gives a   better overall understanding of the development of this industry at a   conceptual level.

  • 8.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Humanitarian cluster leads: lessons from 4PLs2012In: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 2042-6747, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 148-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the role of humanitarian cluster leads through applying lessons from the fourth-party logistics (4PL) literature.

    Design/methodology/approach – The primary data for this paper are based on an extensive case study of coordination mechanisms in humanitarian logistics covering specifically the UNJLC (United Nations Joint Logistics Centre) and the Logistics Cluster. In total, 37 semi-structured interviews were conducted, together with site visits and review of official documentation.

    Findings – The paper finds that the 4PL concept provides a partial match for the cluster leads with important lessons from the 4PL literature. In particular, lessons are related to selectivity of central participants for the cluster, and the need to develop relationship management skills.

     Research limitations/implications – The paper shows some clear areas where lessons from the 4PL literature are highly relevant to the logistics cluster lead. Some of these implications can also be applied to the other clusters, but further concepts should be developed for the cluster system as a whole.

    Social implications – The analysis shows that cluster leads should think of themselves more as facilitators rather than channel captains.

     

    Originality/value – The tasks for the humanitarian cluster leads have been outlined in some detail, but the ways to accomplish them and how they should operate in relation to other actors in the field has been less clear. By using the 4PL concept the paper demonstrates a number of lessons that are relevant to the logistics cluster lead in particular.

  • 9.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Opportunities and constraints for intermediaries in distribution: The challenge of variety2010In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 194-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The variety in contemporary distribution systems is large and reflects complex customer demands and new technological and organizational possibilities. Changes in the distribution system lead to new challenges and constraints for intermediaries trying to establish consistent roles for themselves. The challenge for theory is how to describe these changed and complex roles.

    This article is based on a case study of one intermediary (a third-party logistics provider) in the car distribution industry. The article presents a framework of six roles, four of which find parallels in functionalist discussions of roles, and two of which appear more closely tied to new developments in distribution. These are specifically tied to the way intermediaries have increased opportunities to act as resource providers and organizers in contemporary distribution.

    The opportunities and constraints for intermediaries in the type of distribution context studied are analyzed using the IMP literature. This proves fruitful in particular through discussing the impact of actor bonds and resource ties. The resources the intermediary controls may be less important in defining its role than the fit with resources possessed by others and the resulting opportunities.

  • 10.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Outcomes of reshoring for Swedish firms: The influence of industrial networks2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hammervoll, TrondHarstad University College.
    International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management: NOFOMA conference special issue on logistics and supply chain management2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Outsourcing to TPL firms: Present customers as a decision criteria2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Third-party logistics providers (TPLs) and their connections with customers have been described in different ways in the literature.  In this article we consider three important aspects TPLs interactions with their customers.

    First, TPLs can be usefully analyzed in terms of the different economies that they achieve, and how they can coordinate differing demands from their customers to achieve efficiency.  The second aspect of TPL interaction with customers is the relation between one TPL and a specific customer, with the TPL providing services of superior quality or low cost.  The third aspect of TPL interaction with customers is the relation between the customers themselves.  We know from previous studies that TPL firms have few customers and deep relationships in most cases (Andersson, 1997).  The consequences for the buyer of the TPL losing or gaining a big customer can then influence the economies of scale and scope extensively. 

    The IMP literature has a great deal to say about interaction between industrial actors and we propose to connect this study to IMP writings on interaction and network effects rather than just the effects between a TPL and single customer.  The position of a service provider such as a TPL can usefully be studied by considering IMP dimensions of actors, activities and resources (Håkansson & Snehota, 1995).

    We report on the initial interviews of a study to explore the relations between TPLs and their buyers, with particular focus on how coordination of services is handled.  Initial results show that the points from the interviews really touch upon two levels.  There is one level to do with the physical network and logistics operations, and another which deals with the actors and the way they interact.  We suggest that the Johansson & Matsson (1992) model of the network and production system can explain how these two levels interact and propose to employ it more extensively.

  • 13.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Outsourcing to TPL firms: Present customers as a decision criteria2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Third-party logistics providers can create economies of scale and scope through activity coordination and specialization.  The size and type of customers and not least the way the TPL works with these is highly important in allowing the TPL to create scale and scope.  The issue of TPL relations with other customers is not however part of purchasing criteria as presented in the literature, presenting a significant and for the firms dangerous gap which needs to be closed.  We review the literature and report on the initial steps of a study to address this gap.

  • 14.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Phases of coordination in humanitarian logistics2012In: NOFOMA 2012 - proceedings of the 24th annual nordic logistics research network conference: 7-8 June 2012, Naantali, Finland / [ed] Juuso Töyli, Laura Johansson, Harri Lorentz, Lauri Ojala and Sini Laari, 2012, p. 885-886Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper

    The number of organisations involved in   relief work in general and humanitarian logistics specifically is large and   increasing, creating new complexity. In this paper we analyse different types   of coordination in two case studies.    This has implications along many dimensions, including the roles of   participants, long and short term development and coordination.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is based on two case studies,   one showing the initial stages of the development of the cluster system in   humanitarian relief, the other the post-election crisis in Kenya.  The original cases were restructured   according to our theoretical framework and analysed accordingly.  In total the cases are based on 39   semi-structured interviews.

    Findings

    We find that the start-up of operations   is skewed by the need for a clear disaster declaration for the cluster   system.  The different roles of the   organisations and differing formal requirements create significant problems   before and after cluster activation and de-activation.  Individual organisations take on many roles   in the cluster system and beyond it, both in terms of vertical and horizontal   coordination. 

    Research limitations/implications

    The two cases have slightly different   foci with the Kenya case relating to a specific emergency whereas the cluster   system describes the system itself based on development in several   emergencies.

    Practical implications

    It may be necessary to treat different   groupings of organisations differently, ideally restricting access based on   the role of the organisation and the stage of the disaster.  Participating organisations are of widely   different types and the same way of coordinating all of these may not be   appropriate.

    What is original/value of paper

    There is a strong need for more academic   empirical research in the field.    Combining these two case studies for comparison allows us to learn new   lessons about how different approaches to coordination have worked in practice.

  • 15.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    The coordination roles of relief organisations in humanitarian logistics2016In: International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications, ISSN 1367-5567, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 465-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of organisations involved in relief work in general and humanitarian logistics specifically is large and increasing, creating new complexity. In this paper we analyse different types of coordination and roles in two case studies of the humanitarian cluster system based on its initial development and the Kenyan Post-election crisis. The different and unclear roles of the organisations create significant problems before and after cluster activation and deactivation. Individual organisations take on many roles in the cluster system and beyond it in terms of coordination. The clarity of the roles affects the need for and ease of coordination. We suggest a simple basic categorisation of roles as a starting point for developing this concept in the field of humanitarian logistics and connect this to coordination.

  • 16.
    Kaneberg, Elvira
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Emergency preparedness planning in developed countries: the Swedish case2016In: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 2042-6747, E-ISSN 2042-6755, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 145-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the needs of the supply-chain (SC) network when coping with permanent and temporary demands, this paper analyzes the Swedish emergency preparedness SC network. This network comprises planning procedures and resources, as well as numerous organizations and other participants in civil society that take part in the system to cope with threats and ongoing crises. Planning constitutes a critical infrastructure because the system must develop the ability to shift SC functions from permanent to temporary networks in ongoing crises and war.

    Design/methodology/approach – A research study is performed based on data gathered by three qualitative methods concerning the SC network of emergency preparedness planning.

    Findings – This study demonstrates the relevance of a wide empirical field challenging several theoretical perspectives of the SC network in preparedness planning and the shift to ongoing crises. Further research targeting key capabilities is needed to further improve understanding of the challenges for developed countries in managing potential threats and crises.

    Originality/value – Actors taking part in the preparedness system have found it challenging to coordinate. Due, in part, to the lack of a common threat profile, key capabilities remain outside preparedness planning, e.g., military, commercial and voluntary actors as well as unclear and inconsistent regulations. Thus, building the SC network demonstrates the need to target the military, the voluntary and commercial sectors and their ability to develop the networks in preparedness planning. In a reformed system, all actors must strengthen civil defense in an all-hazard approach, which in planning encompasses the entire threat scale, demonstrating key functions and the ability to shift to temporary networks responding to ongoing crises, including war.

  • 17.
    Kaneberg, Elvira
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Voluntary sector networks in emergency preparedness in developed countries: the case of Sweden2017In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Challenges and Conflicts in Sustainable Supply Chain Management: Evidence from the Heavy Vehicle Industry2014In: Supply Chain Forum: an International Journal, ISSN 1625-8312, E-ISSN 1624-6039, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding and explore the challenges and conflicts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) through empirical examples from the heavy vehicle industry in Sweden and China. An exploratory study of the case company’s supply chains in two countries is conducted for this paper. The major components of the empirical data are interviews with the company´s representatives and its downstream supply chain members in Sweden and China, as well as workshops with the logistics industry’s representatives in China. The findings show that the firms perceive the challenges on the regulatory and organisational levels. The conflicts can be found between several stakeholder groups, the main focus seems to be on environmental and economic aspects. Life-cycle solution for the vehicles’ utilisation is valuable but there are challenges to employing it, especially in the Chinese context. The results show that intensified international collaboration on environment and traffic safety can help tackle challenges and ease the conflicts in sustainable supply chain management.

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